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Woodworkers Guide: Easy to build Continuous Motion Treadle Lathe

Woodworkers Guide: Easy to build Continuous Motion Treadle Lathe
Guest Post by WoodChuxHere's an inexpensive, portable treadle lathe design that you can make in a couple of weekends, out of scrap wood, and some relatively inexpensive hardware. But don't let the quick build time fool you. The simple design of this heavy duty shop built lathe makes it as easy to use as it is to build. Whether you are looking for a daily use lathe, a conversation piece, or want to turn using the sweat of your brow, this is the lathe for you. Woodworking has been a lifelong passion of mine. It all started one cold Christmas morning when I was 6 years old. Over the last 25+ years, the tools have gotten bigger, better, and more expensive. This dilemma was on my mind during last year's family trip. Web sites for this build: Woodchux is my website containing the free step by step plans to build this lathe. Roy Underhill is an amazing woodworking. Grizzly purchased the spindle and spindle bearings from Grizzly's parts department.

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Build an 1805 Treadle Lathe by Stephen Shepherd Stephen Shepherd is a maker of traditional pattern woodworking tools and a writer on early woodworking technique. His passion for this subject has inspired him to design, build and develop a set of plans for a reproduction 1805 turning lathe, with a small workbench area conveniently built into the lathe bed. While it is easy to dismiss a foot-powered tool as inefficient in the modern age, foot powered lathes give you a wonderful mix of safety, control, and exercise. Turning speeds are lower, but with sharp tools you will turn as fast as with an electric lathe. The speed is infinitely variable and the lathe can even go backwards, which is a help for finishing.

Willow Bark Slip Whistle The Willow Bark Slip Whistle is a nice easy little project requiring only a small knife and a piece of freshly cut willow. The piece of willow should be about thumb width in diameter and about a hand span (150mm) in length (this will be plenty for the whistle and also give you a good length ‘working handle’ to carve with safely). For this example I’m using a piece of Grey Sallow as it is locally abundant in the area, but any willow will work just as well. It works best in the spring or early summer when the sap is rising in the trees. Safety first, note the comfortable sitting position with elbows resting on the knees, and a wooden chopping block for cutting onto.

Getting screws to hold in end grain Because wood is relatively weak perpendicular to its grain, screws don't hold that well when screwed into the end grain. This firstly because the thread has a harder time cutting into the grain fro the side, and also because what it does grab shears out more easily, as the shear is cross-grain. Wood screws do, however, hold extremely well in cross grain. Treadle Lathe Build - WoodChux Continues Motion Treadle Lathe Construction: The continuous action treadle lathe, also known as a flywheel treadle lathe, below is an old design. Miniature wooden watches by Valery Danevich Miniature wooden watches by Valery Danevich Posted By admin on April 20, 2011 Miniature watch-pendant by Valery Danevich These pocket watches are made by Valery Danevich ( Валерий Даневич ) from Kiev, Ukraine. The only non-wood detail in these watches is the spring and they are fully working. Valeri Danevitsch was born on 13th October 1968 in Kiev, Ukraine.

Bob Easton » Blog Archive » Treadle Lathe Preserving history at the Kansas City Renaissance Festival A lathe, my dearest, an ole time treadle lathe. Re-enacting at Fort Osage Missouri We looked at some pictures a while. Free Woodworking Software See also: Free online ww software, Free trial ww software Here is an assortment of free woodworking programs than can be downloaded and run directly on your computer. Most of these programs have been around for awhile so you can feel reasonably secure that they are virus and spyware free. Using Stain to Make Artwork! {Burn pile Buffet Part 2} If you missed Part 1 of our Buffet Transformation, click here to read about how we rescued this buffet from a burn pile… stripped, sanded, repaired, primed, and painted! Next is the fun part. You may not know this about me, but I love to draw with charcoal. I love the shading, and the instant gratification of seeing a masterpiece unfold before your eyes. I can’t draw a person to save my life… but I can shade, yo! I get an inordinate amount of joy from coming up with new ways to make furniture (or a room) unique and beautiful.