Woodworkers Guide: Easy to build Continuous Motion Treadle Lathe

Woodworkers Guide: Easy to build Continuous Motion Treadle Lathe
Guest Post by WoodChuxHere's an inexpensive, portable treadle lathe design that you can make in a couple of weekends, out of scrap wood, and some relatively inexpensive hardware. But don't let the quick build time fool you. The simple design of this heavy duty shop built lathe makes it as easy to use as it is to build. Whether you are looking for a daily use lathe, a conversation piece, or want to turn using the sweat of your brow, this is the lathe for you. Woodworking has been a lifelong passion of mine. It all started one cold Christmas morning when I was 6 years old.

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Build an 1805 Treadle Lathe by Stephen Shepherd Stephen Shepherd is a maker of traditional pattern woodworking tools and a writer on early woodworking technique. His passion for this subject has inspired him to design, build and develop a set of plans for a reproduction 1805 turning lathe, with a small workbench area conveniently built into the lathe bed. While it is easy to dismiss a foot-powered tool as inefficient in the modern age, foot powered lathes give you a wonderful mix of safety, control, and exercise. Turning speeds are lower, but with sharp tools you will turn as fast as with an electric lathe. The speed is infinitely variable and the lathe can even go backwards, which is a help for finishing.

Willow Bark Slip Whistle | Tardigrade The Willow Bark Slip Whistle is a nice easy little project requiring only a small knife and a piece of freshly cut willow. The piece of willow should be about thumb width in diameter and about a hand span (150mm) in length (this will be plenty for the whistle and also give you a good length ‘working handle’ to carve with safely). For this example I’m using a piece of Grey Sallow as it is locally abundant in the area, but any willow will work just as well. It works best in the spring or early summer when the sap is rising in the trees. Safety first, note the comfortable sitting position with elbows resting on the knees, and a wooden chopping block for cutting onto. Getting screws to hold in end grain Because wood is relatively weak perpendicular to its grain, screws don't hold that well when screwed into the end grain. This firstly because the thread has a harder time cutting into the grain fro the side, and also because what it does grab shears out more easily, as the shear is cross-grain. Wood screws do, however, hold extremely well in cross grain.

Four Simple Woodworking Joints Here (Pic 9) are the 4 main joints that you can use to make everything from shelves to rocking chairs. A-Wedged Mortise and Tenon JointsPic 9-A A tenon is usually a round or square piece of wood that goes partially or all the way through a hole cut into another piece of wood. Here you see a square tenon. Pic 9-B-Sliding DovetailThe sliding dovetail is useful for braces on doors or for attaching chair legs to chair feet and chair legs to chair or stool seats. Underhill Foot-powered Lathe and Scrollsaw In the comments for “One Schwarzpower. Fail.” Chris C. mentioned Roy Underhill’s “Lathe from a Loft” article, which we ran in the October 2000 issue of Popular Woodworking. In this story, Roy used recycled lumber (read: he went dumpster diving, much to his daughter’s embarrassment) to make a treadle lathe and scrollsaw.

Free Woodworking Software See also: Free online ww software, Free trial ww software Here is an assortment of free woodworking programs than can be downloaded and run directly on your computer. Most of these programs have been around for awhile so you can feel reasonably secure that they are virus and spyware free.

Luthier Clamps Luthier Clamps Steve Maskery 9th June 2005 A version of this article first appeared in Good Woodworking #165. These Luthier clamps are quick and easy to make, and light to use; great when you need lots of clamps rather than lots of pressure. Each clamp consists of a bar, a fixed head and a movable cam-operated jaw. How to Build a Garden Arbor: Simple DIY Woodworking Project The obvious way to define your yard is to put up a fence. The cool way is to forget the fence and just build a gateway -- a portal from here to there that implies a change of space without presenting a physical barrier. Materials are readily available -- 4 x 4s for the posts, 2 x 6s for the arches and braces, and 1 x 6 stock ripped to width for the remaining pieces. You can use pressure-treated lumber if you can find straight, dry stock -- warped wood will just leave you frustrated. We chose cedar as a carpenter-friendly alternative.

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