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Internet History Sourcebooks

Internet History Sourcebooks
Update Information 2006: In 2006 the Internet Medieval Sourcebooks and associated sourcebooks are undergoing a major overhaul to remove bad links and add more documents. 1. This project is both very large and fairly old in Internet terms. At the time it was instigated (1996), it was not clear that web sites [and the documents made available there] would often turn out to be transient. As a result there is a process called "link rot" - which means that a "broken link" is a result of someone having taken down a web page. In some cases some websites have simply reorganized sub-directories without creating forwarding links. 2. 3. The Internet Medieval Sourcebook is organized as three main index pages, with a number of supplementary documents. INTRODUCTION: MEDIEVAL SOURCES ON THE INTERNET Historians teaching medieval history surveys almost always want to combine a textbook, a sourcebook, and additional readings. DOCUMENT SIZE: The size of documents for teaching purposes is an issue.

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.asp

Related:  Primary SourcesMiddle AgesGeneral ResearchHistorical Library

Decameron Web The Project | Boccaccio | Texts | Brigata | Plague | Literature | History | Society | Religion | Arts Maps | Themes & Motifs | Bibliography | Pedagogy | Syllabus **** Site Maintenance **** We are currently updating parts of the Decameron Web: the Italian and English texts are temporarily unavailable , but will be available again soon. The rest of site works as normal.

International Joan of Arc Society International Joan of Arc Society Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc The International Joan of Arc Society / Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc is a WWW repository of scholarly and pedagogic information about Joan of Arc collected by faculty, independent scholars, and students. Director: Bonnie Wheeler Assistant Director: Jane Marie Pinzino The Harvard Classics: Download All 51 Volumes as Free eBooks Every revolutionary age produces its own kind of nostalgia. Faced with the enormous social and economic upheavals at the nineteenth century’s end, learned Victorians like Walter Pater, John Ruskin, and Matthew Arnold looked to High Church models and played the bishops of Western culture, with a monkish devotion to preserving and transmitting old texts and traditions and turning back to simpler ways of life. It was in 1909, the nadir of this milieu, before the advent of modernism and world war, that The Harvard Classics took shape.

The English Emblem Book Project Word and Image In recent years, scholars in many disciplines have recognized that the literally thousands of engravings, wood blocks, and etchings in emblem books constitute an unparalleled source not only for the study of daily life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries but also for extraordinary insights into what the intellectuals of the times viewed as a necessary adjunct to heraldry, social life, politics, philosophy, and moral behavior. The English emblem books scanned for this project are cultural artifacts frequently used in the analysis of reading practices, printing history, Elizabethan popular culture, the use of allegory, and the relationship of word to image. An emblem combines a picture and text for the striking presentation of a message.

Middle Ages Updated September 2010 Terms & Glossaries / Timelines / Maps / Feudalism - Daily Life - Carolingian Empire/Charlemagne The Crusades - Heraldry - Chivalry - Knighthood / War, Warfare & Weaponry Important People / Law / Science & Technology / Historical Texts Collection : History Department : Hanover College The Hanover Historical Texts Collection makes available digital versions of historical texts for use in history and humanities courses. Search by keyword, or browse by subject heading. The faculty and students of the Hanover College History Department initiated the Hanover Historical Texts Project in 1995, at a time when few primary sources were available outside of published anthologies. To make primary texts readily available for classroom use, they selected important documents, scanned print versions that were out of copyright, converted the scans into HTML format, proofread the resulting documents to correct OCR errors, edited them to provide page breaks, page numbers, and bibliographical information, and posted them online. We have since expanded the collection to include transcriptions of manuscript material from the Hanover College archives. Most of the texts in the Hanover Historical Texts Collection are in public domain.

Home Click here to jump straight to the articles: Original Preface. The Catholic Encyclopedia, as its name implies, proposes to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. What the Church teaches and has taught; what she has done and is still doing for the highest welfare of mankind; her methods, past and present; her struggles, her triumphs, and the achievements of her members, not only for her own immediate benefit, but for the broadening and deepening of all true science, literature and art — all come within the scope of the Catholic Encyclopedia. It differs from the general encyclopedia in omitting facts and information which have no relation to the Church. On the other hand, it is not exclusively a church encyclopedia, nor is it limited to the ecclesiastical sciences and the doings of churchmen.

13 Google Search Tricks That Make Life A Whole Lot Easier You think you know how to Google? You don’t know how to Google. Even the most seasoned Googler might not know every tip and trick available with just a few extra keystrokes in the search bar. Consider this your instructions manual for the world’s most popular search engine. The Scenario: You’re playing Scrabble and some dumb-dumb says, “Hey, ‘panacea’ isn’t a word!” The Solution: Just type “define:” followed by the word you want and Google will take you straight to the definition. Medieval Underpants and Other Blunders: A Writer’s (& Editor’s) Guide to Keeping Historical Fiction Free of Common Anachronisms, Errors, & Myths [Second Edition] - A book by Susanne Alleyn - page 25 (click on the note number to return to your place in the text.) Anachronisms in Locations: Getting the Geography Right If you’ve decided to set your period novel in a fictional English or American town or a small imaginary Balkan kingdom, then you don’t need to worry about getting your streets right. If, however, you’re setting your story in London, Paris, New York, or any major city worldwide, or even a smaller town that happens to have an active historical society, and you plan to be the least bit specific about your locations, the first thing you need—even if you live there—is a map. But don’t run to the travel section in the nearest Barnes & Noble or WH Smith and grab a dumbed-down tourist map of Paris or Rome ("Nobody will notice . . .").

Medieval and Renaissance Fact and Fiction undefined This page is meant to be a guide to resources available on the Web for people who are interested in the history, culture, literature and re-creation of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. There are hundreds of sites on the Middle Ages on the Web. Darwin's Reading Reading was a fundamental tool in Darwin’s scientific practice. He read widely in the scientific literature of natural history, he also copiously annotated many books and articles and he systematically abstracted many of his annotations. Since a big part of his strategy for supporting the theory of evolution relied on his ability to translate the biological problems of his day into evolutionary terms, the documentary record of his Darwin’s reading cuts across the topical structure of the Darwin archive.

The Britannia Lexicon Have you always wanted to travel back in time to the Middle Ages but were hesitant because you didn't speak the language? Presenting the Britannia Lexicon of strange legal, feudal, chivalric, monastic, military and architectural terms to help you understand what those guys back then were really trying to say. In addition, we will soon be including lengthier entries on particular events, wars, movements and organizations, called "Sidebars of History" which will give a more in-depth view of life, politics and religion in medieval Britain. Just click a letter below to begin. Book titles with full text online "The 1688 Paradise Lost and Dr. Aldrich": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 6 (1972) Boorsch, Suzanne (1972) 20th-Century Art: A Resource for Educators Paul, Stella (1999) 82nd & Fifth The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2013) Abbot Suger and Saint-Denis Gerson, Paula Lieber, ed. (1986) "About Mäda": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 40 (2005) Baetjer, Katharine (2005)

The medieval Dance of Death, Dødedantz (1634), Part 2 Dødedantz starts with a table of contents - the order of appearance, however, isn't quite right. Click the small picture to see the original page. To read the original medieval Danish, click the red and white flag in the top right corner. It was typical for medieval plays to begin with herald or a "prologus" who would introduce the play and request the audience to remain quiet and listen. Notice his coat of arms: A skull and an hourglass. Then follows the text (without illustrations) from Copenhagen's Dance of Death with a few variations due to the almost 100 years separating the two publications.

Related:  HistoryLibraries, online