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OASIS

OASIS
OASIS aims to provide an authoritative ‘sourcebook’ on Open Access, covering the concept, principles, advantages, approaches and means to achieving it. The site highlights developments and initiatives from around the world, with links to diverse additional resources and case studies. As such, it is a community-building as much as a resource-building exercise. Users are encouraged to share and download the resources provided, and to modify and customize them for local use. Open Access is evolving, and we invite the growing world-wide community to take part in this exciting global movement. Read more about the site.

http://www.openoasis.org/

Related:  Historical Information Plus ResourcesgeneralOa

What are Historical Sources? — Faculty of History A source is anything that has been left behind by the past. It might be a document, but it might alternatively be a building or a picture or a piece of ephemera – a train ticket perhaps or a plastic cup. They are called 'sources' because they provide us with information which can add to the sum of our knowledge of the past. Sources only become historical evidence, however, when they are used by a historian to make a point. What they are evidence of will depend on what the historian is trying to say.

Occam's Typewriter The internet was all aflutter last week because Elsevier has sent thousands of take-down notices to Academia.edu, a social networking site where many researchers post and share their published papers. This marks a significant change of tack for Elsevier. Previously the publisher had only been sending a handful of DMCAs a week to Academia.edu (the notices are named after the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act), but now it appears they have decided to get tough. There was the predictable outrage at the manoeuvre though, as several commentators acknowledged, Elsevier is acting entirely legally. It is simply enforcing rights that were handed to it — for no compensation — by the authors who have now been affected by the takedown demands. The company is behaving rationally.

Open Access The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Most publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Why Study History? (1998) By Peter N. Stearns People live in the present. They plan for and worry about the future.

Report claims improvements needed for article processing charges » As a response to the Finch report, the UK Open Access Implementation Group (OAIG) examines how intermediaries could help manage the impact an increase in the volumes of open access article processing charges (APCs) could have for universities, funders and publishers. The implementation of the Finch report and new polices from Research Councils will result in vastly increased volumes of open access publishing in the UK, and in payments of article processing charges (APCs). The “The Potential Role for Intermediaries in Managing the Payment of Open Access Article Processing Charges” report reveals an almost universal consensus that work is required to develop and implement standards to facilitate more effective flows between authors, publishers, universities and funders of information relating to the payment of article processing charges (APCs) – the charges levied by some publishers of open access and hybrid journals to meet the costs of the publication process. -Ends-

Oxford Open Oxford Open OUP Supports Open Access Oxford University Press (OUP) is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both green and gold open access (OA) publishing to support this mission. A Proven Track Record of Success OUP has been publishing OA content since 2004. A Linguist Explains the Grammar of Shipping - The Toast Our resident linguist’s previous work for The Toast can be found here. Let’s talk about shipping. No, not the transportation of goods over the water, but that feeling when you want a couple fictional characters to smush their faces against each other and never let go. Gold Open Access: Counting the Costs Printer-friendly version Send to friend Theo Andrew presents new data on the cost of Gold OA publishing at the University of Edinburgh. Research Councils UK (RCUK) have recently announced a significant amendment to their open access (OA) policy which requires all research papers that result from research partly or wholly funded by RCUK to be made open access [1]. To comply with this policy, researchers must either; a) publish in an open access journal, termed Gold OA, which often incurs an article processing charge (APC); or, b) ensure that a copy of the post-print is deposited in an appropriate repository, also known as Green OA. A subsequent clarification from RCUK stated that Gold OA is the preferred mechanism of choice to realise open access for outputs that they have funded and have announced the award of block grants to eligible institutions to achieve this aim [2].

OAIster Access to OAIster A freely accessible site for searching only OAIster records is available at Additionally, OAIster records are fully accessible through WorldCat.org, and appear as WorldCat.org search results along with records from thousands of libraries worldwide. The OAIster database is searchable on the OCLC FirstSearch service, providing another valuable access point for this rich database and a complement to other FirstSearch databases. The geography of academic knowledge Our team recently had the opportunity of working with some submission data from SAGE journals. Amongst other things, the data tell us where authors of articles come from, and primary discipline of the journal they are submitting to. We therefore decided to map out the geography of submissions for journals in five categories: Communication (n = 22), Clinical Medicine and Critical Care (51), Cultural Studies (7), Engineering and Computing (34), and Management and Organization Studies (28). A few broad patterns are apparent here. First, we see way more academic content coming from the Global North than from the Global South. Africa in particular is notable for its absence.

UNESCO’s Open Access (OA) Curriculum is now online Within the overall framework of the organization’s strategy on OA, the recent launch of OA curricula for Researchers and Library Schools by UNESCO highlights its efforts for enhancing capacities to deal with Open Access issues. The carefully designed and developed sets of OA curricula for researchers and library and information professionals are based on two needs assessment surveys, and several rounds of face-to-face and online consultations with relevant stakeholders. These curricula will soon be converted into self-directed e-learning tools, which will enable users to self-assess their knowledge on Open Access and take a learning pace that is initiated and directed by the learners themselves. UNESCO also aims to strengthen this initiative by translating the OA curricula into several languages that will increase their reach and impact. Curriculum for Library Schools Curriculum for Researchers

Australia, we need to talk about the way we speak We must reclaim rhetoric as an important fixture of Australian culture, teach it to all students in our schools and raise our standards of communication. Photo: iStock Let's get things straight about the origins of the Australian accent.

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