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Animated map shows how religion spread around the world

Animated map shows how religion spread around the world

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvFl6UBZLv4

Related:  uUE1Thoughts on religionMapsTimelineGlobalization

3-Question Quiz Predicts Whether You Believe in God by Steven Mazie According to a Harris Poll conducted last year, about three-quarters of Americans—74 percent, to be precise—believe in God. That is a lot of people, but the figure is notably lower than it was in identical polls conducted over the past decade. In 2005, 2007 and 2009, 82 percent of Americans said they were believers. Animated interactive of the history of the Atlantic slave trade. Source: slavevoyages.org For the full interactive version, use a larger device. Interactive by Andrew Kahn. Background image by Tim Jones. Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. But as we discussed in Episode 2 of Slate’s History of American Slavery Academy, relative to the entire slave trade, North America was a bit player.

The Wetsuitman A gale was blowing from the south-west as the elderly architect put on his jacket and rubber boots and went to face the elements. Down in the bay, four metre high waves crashed against the cliffs and sent sea spray hundreds of metres across the grazing land at Norway’s southernmost tip. The first thing the architect noticed when he approached the sea was a wetsuit. It lay stretched out on the small patch of grass between the cliffs, right outside the reach of the waves. “That might be useful,” the architect thought.

Digital Film Historiography – A Bibliography With digitisation of film heritage occurring at an increasing pace, the past decade has seen an array of digital formats of access and reuse emerge, in scholarly as well as in museum contexts, to become central to the production, contemplation and validation of film historical knowledge: video essays, data visualizations, DVDs, online platforms and museum installations are formats that increasingly permeate sites of film historical knowledge. As pointed out by film and media scholars Vinzenz Hediger (2008), Malte Hagener (2011) and Katherine Groo (2012) with regard to this development, it becomes increasingly urgent to understand how and if the appropriations of digitised films in these formats confirm, challenge or reformulate understandings of film history. Addressing this debate and the concerns it expresses, I have established the bibliography below with the aim of enhancing the overview of emerging uses of digital methods in film historical research amongst film and media scholars.

Chuang Tzu: The Next Voice Refinement of Energy and Perfection of Spirit. Chuang Tzu (399 - 295 B.C.) has always been an influential Chinese philosopher. His writing is at once transcendental while at the same time being deeply immersed within everyday life. He is at peace while at the same time moving through the world. There is a deep vein of mysticism within him which is illuminated by his very rational nature. His style of writing with its parables and conversations both accessible while at the same time pointing to deeper issues.

667 - Pop! Goes the World: 7.2 Billion and Counting by Frank Jacobs The world has added over 800 million people over the last decade – a number so vast it is almost meaningless. Unless you convert it to more familiar units of measurement: Four Brazils. Two and a half times the U.S. More than half of China. The Human Journey: Migration Routes When humans first ventured out of Africa some 60,000 years ago, they left genetic footprints still visible today. By mapping the appearance and frequency of genetic markers in modern peoples, we create a picture of when and where ancient humans moved around the world. These great migrations eventually led the descendants of a small group of Africans to occupy even the farthest reaches of the Earth. Our species is an African one: Africa is where we first evolved, and where we have spent the majority of our time on Earth. The earliest fossils of recognizably modern Homo sapiens appear in the fossil record at Omo Kibish in Ethiopia, around 200,000 years ago. Although earlier fossils may be found over the coming years, this is our best understanding of when and approximately where we originated.

How Nutella Explains the World Not only is Nutella sold all over the world—250,000 tons of the scrumptious chocolate goo is sold across 75 countries every year—its ingredients are sourced from just about everywhere. It’s hazelnut-flavored globalization in a jar, inspiring the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to use the popular spread as a case study for “global value chains.” The report reveals just how tightly integrated and small the world has become. Digital Humanities 2013 8:30am - 10:00amLP01: Long Paper SessionLocation: Embassy CChair: Edward Vanhoutte Uncovering the “hidden histories” of computing in the Humanities 1949 – 1980: findings and reflections on the pilot project Nyhan, Julianne Digital Textual Studies, Social Informatics, and the Sociology of Texts: A Case Study in Early Digital Medievalism Simpson, Grant Leyton

The Next Time Someone Uses The Bible To Say Homosexuality Is A Sin, Show Them This. Dr. Laura Schlessinger is a radio personality who dispenses advice to people who call in to her radio show. Recently, she said that, as an observant Orthodox Jew, homosexuality is an abomination according to Leviticus 18:22 and cannot be condoned under any circumstance. The following is an open letter to Dr. US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs by Frank Jacobs Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a convenient way of measuring and comparing the size of national economies. Annual GDP represents the market value of all goods and services produced within a country in a year.

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