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Born Again Pagan - An Atheist Smorgasbord: Movies, Comics, Photos, Stories and Much More!

Born Again Pagan - An Atheist Smorgasbord: Movies, Comics, Photos, Stories and Much More!

http://bornagainpagan.com/

Related:  Religion / AtheismInfidelities: Collection No 4

ERS Charles Darwin and other early evolutionists were fascinated by religious phenomena and how they might be explained from an evolutionary perspective. Nevertheless, evolutionary theory became restricted to the biological sciences and excluded from the study of many human-related subjects for most of the 20th century. Only now is the theory being used to explain all aspects of humanity in addition to the rest of life. The new field of evolutionary religious studies is part of this larger trend. This website provides an introduction to the study of religion from an evolutionary perspective. It includes the following features:

BBC Religion & Ethics - Scottish couples say 'I do' to Humanist weddings 3 May 2013Last updated at 09:23 By Karen Millington BBC Reporter Humanist weddings have become increasingly popular in Scotland, and they may outnumber Church of Scotland weddings if current trends continue, says the Humanist Society Scotland. Any couple in the UK can choose to have a Humanist ceremony, but outside Scotland marriage must also involve a legally recognised service. Parody religion A parody religion or mock religion is an imitation belief system that challenges spiritual convictions of others, often through humor, satire, and/or burlesque (literary ridicule). Often created to achieve a specific purpose related to another belief system, a parody religion can be a parody of several religions, sects, gurus, cults, and or new religious movements at the same time or a parody of no particular religion, instead parodying the concept of religious belief. In some parody religions, emphasis is on making fun and being a convenient excuse for pleasant social interaction among like-minded, e.g. the Church of the SubGenius. Other parody religions target a specific religion, sect, cult, or new religious movement. One approach to parody religion aims to highlight deficiencies in particular pro-religious arguments — the thinking being that if a given argument can also be used to support a clear parody, then the original argument is clearly flawed. Post-modern religions[edit]

Portland State Sociology of Islam & Muslim Societies The Sociology of Islam and Muslim Societies Newsletter: Winter 2011 Newsletter No. 7 - ISSN:1942-7948 Contents Social and Political Transformations in the Middle East - Umit Kurt and Oguz Alyanak The Political Economy of Turkey’s Response to the Arab Spring - Altay Atli Footsteps of Revolution in the Land of Queen Sheba - Bezen Balamir Coskun Two Sides of the Same Coin; Conflicting Views of Islamism in Pakistan - Jeanette Bailey Egypt and the "Arab Spring": Notes on Facts and Challenges - Moises Garduño García The Arab Spring and the Turkish Model - Alper Y. Dede Will Geopolitics Split Along Sectarian Lines in the Middle East? Witnessing the Rise of a Sectarian Speech Amidst War of Perceptions - Camille Germanos Turkey as a Model Democracy?

Why the Peaceful Majority is Irrelevant - Op-Eds 1. Sounds right to me Sounds right to me. At this point I am biblically apocalyptic about it. The Christopher Hitchens Web WhitePagesGoesGreen.org by YellowPagesGoesGreen.org (Yellow Pages Directory Inc.) is a leading online directory allowing users to search an online database and telephone directory for all telephone numbers in the USA. Using the above boxes, simply type in a name and location. Even if you don't have the complete information, the telephone number lookup database can help you find phone numbers. Using WhitePagesGoesGreen.org, you'll be on your way to finding residential phone numbers and connect with the person you're looking for.

Let Atheists (or Jews or Muslims) Care For Your Pets After the Rapture For a small fee, of course. Via Tyler Cowen, two websites -- Eternal Earth-Bound Pets, USA and JesusPets – that promise a service in which atheists who are also animal-lovers agree to care for the pets of those taken in the rapture. From Eternal Earth-Bound Pets: You've committed your life to Jesus. You know you're saved. But when the Rapture comes what's to become of your loving pets who are left behind?

Irreligion by country World nonreligious population by percentage, Dentsu Institute (2006) and Zuckerman (2005)[1] Irreligion, which may include atheism, agnosticism, ignosticism, antireligion, skepticism, freethought, antitheism, apatheism, non-belief, secular humanism, and deism, varies in the different countries around the world. About 16% of the world population (1.1 billion people) are estimated to be nonreligious.[2] Methodology[edit] NeuroTribes "The Structure of Flame" by autistic artist Jessica Park. Courtesy of Pure Vision Arts: In 2007, the United Nations passed a resolution declaring April 2 World Autism Awareness Day — an annual opportunity for fundraising organizations to bring public attention to a condition considered rare just a decade ago.

Going Godless: Does Secularism Make People More Ethical? Barry Kosmin is a different kind of market researcher. His data focuses on consumers targeted by companies like Lifechurch.tv or World Overcomers Christian Church TM. The sociologist analyzes church-affiliated commercial entities, from souvenir shops to television channels and worship services. But the most significant target of Kosmin's research is the consumer group most likely to shy away from such commercial products: secularists. List of secularist organizations Secularist organizations promote the view that moral standards should be based solely on concern for the good of humanity in the present life, without reference to supernatural concepts, such as God or an afterlife. The term secularism, as coined and promulgated by George Jacob Holyoake, originally referred to such a view.[1] Secularism may also refer to the belief that government should be neutral on matters of religion, and that church and state should be separate. The term is here used in the first sense, though most organizations listed here also support secularism in the second sense. Secularists, and their organizations, identify themselves by a variety of terms, including agnostic, atheist, bright, freethinker, humanist, nontheist, naturalist, rationalist, or skeptic.[2][3] Despite the use of these various terms, the organizations listed here have secularist goals in common.

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