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History of the world

History of the world
World population[1] from 10,000 BCE to 2,000 CE. The vertical (population) scale is logarithmic. The history of the world is the history of humanity, beginning with the Paleolithic Era. Distinct from the history of the Earth (which includes early geologic history and prehuman biological eras), world history comprises the study of archaeological and written records, from ancient times on. Ancient recorded history begins with the invention of writing.[2][3] However, the roots of civilization reach back to the period before the invention of writing. Outside the Old World, including ancient China[27] and ancient India, historical timelines unfolded differently. Prehistory[edit] Early humans[edit] Modern humans spread rapidly from Africa into the frost-free zones of Europe and Asia around 60,000 years ago.[32] The rapid expansion of humankind to North America and Oceania took place at the climax of the most recent Ice Age, when temperate regions of today were extremely inhospitable.

10 ways to improve your observation skills (and your career), part III | Fast Track Tools by Ken Revenaugh How did you do on the observation test? If you found your observation skills lacking, it may be something to consider working on, as… For people who plan to become the leaders of tomorrow, developing a keen sense of observation is a must. The crux of the technique lies in simply keeping your eyes and ears open at all times and never failing to register what you see or hear. Some great habits that can help you build your observation skills are: Trying to look at every day life in a clear manner. Andrew Cox suggests these ten behaviors and habits of thought critical for developing accurate observation skills: Sizing up people – people watching Clarity – seeing the world as it is Curiosity – asking why Listening skills Willingness to set aside personal biases Willingness to seek the inputs of others Seeking out new experiences and possibilities Being comfortable with ambiguity Knowledge of the behaviors and attitudes of people

List of timelines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of timelines currently on Wikipedia. §Types[edit] §General timelines[edit] §History[edit] §Arts[edit] §Biographical timelines[edit] §Crime[edit] §Events[edit] §Disasters[edit] §Economics[edit] §Entertainment[edit] §Environmental issues[edit] §Fiction[edit] §Geographical timelines[edit] Timeline of country and capital changes §Ancient civilizations[edit] §Extant civilizations[edit] §Supranational entities and regions, peoples[edit] §Sovereign states[edit] §Subnational regions and cities, narrow timelines[edit] §Law[edit] §Military[edit] §Military conflicts[edit] §Philosophy[edit] §Politics[edit] §Religion[edit] §Ayyavazhi[edit] Timeline of Ayyavazhi history (1809–present) §Buddhism[edit] Timeline of Buddhism (563 BCE – present) §Christianity[edit] §Islam[edit] §Jainism[edit] Timeline of Jainism §Judaism[edit] §Sikhism[edit] Sikh Gurus (1469–1666) §Science[edit] §Astronautics and planetary science[edit] §Astronomy, Astrophysics, and Cosmology[edit] §Biology[edit] §Sports[edit]

Ancient Greece The Parthenon, a temple dedicated to Athena, located on the Acropolis in Athens, is one of the most representative symbols of the culture and sophistication of the ancient Greeks. Ancient Greece was a Greek civilization belonging to a period of Greek history that lasted from the Archaic period of the 8th to 6th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (ca. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages and the Byzantine era.[1] Included in ancient Greece is the period of Classical Greece, which flourished during the 5th to 4th centuries BC. Classical Greece began with the repelling of a Persian invasion by Athenian leadership. Classical Greek culture, especially philosophy, had a powerful influence on the Roman Empire, which carried a version of it to many parts of the Mediterranean Basin and Europe, for which reason Classical Greece is generally considered to be the seminal culture which provided the foundation of modern Western culture.[2][3][4][5]

Middle Ages In European history, the Middle Ages, or Medieval period, lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and merged into the Renaissance and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: Antiquity, Medieval period, and Modern period. The Medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, the High, and the Late Middle Ages. Depopulation, deurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. During the High Middle Ages, which began after AD 1000, the population of Europe increased greatly as technological and agricultural innovations allowed trade to flourish and the Medieval Warm Period climate change allowed crop yields to increase. Etymology and periodisation[edit] Later Roman Empire[edit] Map of the approximate political boundaries in Europe around 450 Early Middle Ages[edit] New societies[edit]

Scurvy Was Common in Columbus’s Colony Scurvy Was Common in Columbus’s Colony Wednesday, April 16, 2014 (Alfredo Coppa and Fernando Luna Calderón) SANTO DOMINGO, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC—Scurvy, a disease caused by a severe vitamin C deficiency, may have contributed to the decline of La Isabela, the colony established by Christopher Columbus on his second voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. “There were lots of diseases, fevers, epidemics, we know from their writing. It seems no one was spared. Learn to Remember Everything: The Memory Palace Technique I'm working on an ebook about memory techniques. If you are interested in knowing when it is ready, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter! In this post I'll teach you how to have perfect recall of lists of items. Length is not much of an issue, it can be your shopping list if 10 items or it can be a list with 50, 100 or even 1000. The technique we'll be learning is called the memory palace, and is also known as the method of loci (for the latin word locus meaning place) and also the mind palace. The memory palace The memory palace technique began in the 5th century B.C., when Simonides of Ceos, poet, was attending an unfortunate banquet in Thessalia. Think about it: It is not hard to remember who sits beside the host, where your friends sit, who is beside them and so on. The memory palace is well suited to how our brains have evolved. Remembering lists may sound lame, who wants to memorise a list...? Your first memory palace: building and filling Begin with the list. Final words

Celts Diachronic distribution of Celtic peoples: core Hallstatt territory, by the 6th century BC maximal Celtic expansion, by 275 BC Lusitanian area of Iberia where Celtic presence is uncertain The Celts (/ˈkɛlts/, occasionally /ˈsɛlts/, see pronunciation of Celtic) or Kelts were an ethnolinguistic group of tribal societies in Iron Age and Medieval Europe who spoke Celtic languages and had a similar culture,[1] although the relationship between the ethnic, linguistic and cultural elements remains uncertain and controversial. The earliest undisputed direct examples of a Celtic language are the Lepontic inscriptions, beginning in the 6th century BC.[6] Continental Celtic languages are attested almost exclusively through inscriptions and place-names. Names and terminology Continental Celts are the Celtic-speaking people of mainland Europe and Insular Celts are the Celtic-speaking peoples of the British and Irish islands and their descendants. Origins Overview of the Hallstatt and La Tène cultures:

History of the alphabet The history of alphabetic writing goes back to the consonantal writing system used for Semitic languages in the Levant in the 2nd millennium B.C. Most or nearly all alphabetic scripts used throughout the world today ultimately go back to this Semitic proto-alphabet.[1] Its first origins can be traced back to a Proto-Sinaitic script developed in Ancient Egypt to represent the language of Semitic-speaking workers in Egypt. This script was partly influenced by the older Egyptian hieratic, a cursive script related to Egyptian hieroglyphs.[2][3] Mainly through Phoenician and Aramaic, two closely related members of the Semitic family of scripts that were in use during the early first millennium BC, the Semitic alphabet became the ancestor of multiple writing systems across the Middle East, Europe, northern Africa and South Asia. Pre-history[edit] Two scripts are well attested from before the end of the fourth millennium BCE: Mesopotamian cuneiform and Egyptian hieroglyphs. Predecessors[edit]

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