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Spotting Emotional Manipulation

Spotting Emotional Manipulation

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Welcome to socionics.com! Welcome to socionics.com! Whether you are a newbie or someone who is already familiar with Types, this guide should help you to get the most out of this site promptly and efficiently. Think of this guide as a simple digest of what is available on this site. Here, on socionics .com, we talk a lot about Socionics and Types. Socionics is in fact an alternative theory of Types similar to Myers-Briggs and Keirsey theory of Types, but being the closest to Jung's Psychological Types Is Emotional Intelligence Overrated? Forget IQ versus EQSix Seconds After 100 years of research, there’s little agreement on the definition of intelligence or how to measure IQ. Yet Adam Grant insists cognitive skill trumps all, and “Emotional Intelligence Is Overrated.” His critique is wrong, but important. His latest post on LinkedIN is a follow up to his Atlantic piece on “The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence,” where he warns it’s risky to develop emotional competence. For example, he even speculates that Hitler used emotional intelligence to manipulate people into a frenzy of mindless loyalty.

Are You Empathic? 3 Types of Empathy and What They Mean You might recall President Bill Clinton's famous quote, "I feel your pain." It suggested that he had empathy and it made him seem more human and in touch with his constituents. Did he really mean it? And, is feeling someone else's pain a good thing, or a bad thing? Psychologist Mark Davis has suggested that there are 3 important types of empathy. Emotions Tone/Attitude Words 1. accusatory-charging of wrong doing 2. apathetic-indifferent due to lack of energy or concern 3. awe-solemn wonder 4. bitter-exhibiting strong animosity as a result of pain or grief 5. cynical-questions the basic sincerity and goodness of people When We Are a Fool to Ourselves Accessing our own higher mental processes is often difficult. Psychologists have found it easy to manipulate the reasons we give for decisions, judgements or actions. Worse than this, even when we’re not actively being manipulated, we regularly fool ourselves without the need of any encouragement.

Emotional vs Intellectual Words I have written about persuasive writing in an article where I discuss Ethos, Logos, Pathos. Persuasive writers use words to convince the reader to listen or to act. I found this useful list of words in an interesting article called Common words that suck emotional power out of your content by John Gregory Olson. He explains how words have emotions attached to them, and that you should choose the correct ones for the response you want to elicit from your reader. Use these words if you want to get an emotional, rather than an intellectual, response from your readers.

7 ways to practice emotional first aid You put a bandage on a cut or take antibiotics to treat an infection, right? No questions asked. In fact, questions would be asked if you didn’t apply first aid when necessary. So why isn’t the same true of our mental health? Gestures and Body Language Hey there! Lots of writers liked my list of facial expressions, so I thought I would do a companion post about gestures and body language. Describing these can help readers visualize a scene and get a feel for the characters, and again, they can set up lines of dialogue so you don’t have a string of he said, she said, he asked, she exclaimed, etc., running down the page. You might want to consider which gestures or what body language is typical for each of your characters.

Topic: Anger Anger is an emotion characterized by antagonism toward someone or something you feel has deliberately done you wrong. Anger can be a good thing. It can give you a way to express negative feelings, for example, or motivate you to find solutions to problems. But excessive anger can cause problems. Increased blood pressure and other physical changes associated with anger make it difficult to think straight and harm your physical and mental health. Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Repressed Emotions Ryan Brown, ContributorWaking Times A common way in which we deal with unpleasant emotions is to suppress or ignore them. These are normal coping mechanisms our minds uses to handle situations we don’t particularly want to deal with in the present moment. 5 Secrets to Being Happy, Backed by Research We all wanna be happier, right? Thing is, depression is at epic levels. More people are unhappy and they’re getting miserable at an even younger age. From Happier: Learn the Secrets to Daily Joy and Lasting Fulfillment: In the United States, rates of depression are ten times higher today than they were in the 1960s, and the average age for the onset of depression is fourteen and a half compared to twenty-nine and a half in 1960. You don’t want to be part of this trend.

Crime Times- linking brain dysfunction to disordered/ criminal/ psychopathic behavior Psychopaths, who are among the most dangerous of criminals, have little or no empathy for the people they hurt. A new study, which investigates how psychopaths look at faces, provides a clue about this callousness and suggests a possible early intervention as well. Impaired fear recognition occurs both in psychopaths and in people who suffer damage to a brain area called the amygdala.

Releasing Unexpressed Emotion Randi G. Fine, ContributorWaking Times “Unexpressed emotion will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.”

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