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Spotting Emotional Manipulation

Spotting Emotional Manipulation

http://www.cassiopaea.com/cassiopaea/emotional_manipulation.htm

Related:  EmotionManipulation & psychopathieMy Mental StudiesEmotion

Repressed Emotions Ryan Brown, ContributorWaking Times A common way in which we deal with unpleasant emotions is to suppress or ignore them. These are normal coping mechanisms our minds uses to handle situations we don’t particularly want to deal with in the present moment. Ten minute test could spot psychopaths A simple test could one day help police to catch psychopathic potential serial killers. Psychologists in Wales have adapted an existing psychological test to identify people with psychopathic tendencies. The 10 minute test is based on the Implicit Association Test, developed in the United States, and used to reveal people's deepest thoughts and feelings.

Welcome to socionics.com! Welcome to socionics.com! Whether you are a newbie or someone who is already familiar with Types, this guide should help you to get the most out of this site promptly and efficiently. Think of this guide as a simple digest of what is available on this site. Here, on socionics .com, we talk a lot about Socionics and Types. Socionics is in fact an alternative theory of Types similar to Myers-Briggs and Keirsey theory of Types, but being the closest to Jung's Psychological Types Is Emotional Intelligence Overrated? Forget IQ versus EQSix Seconds After 100 years of research, there’s little agreement on the definition of intelligence or how to measure IQ. Yet Adam Grant insists cognitive skill trumps all, and “Emotional Intelligence Is Overrated.” His critique is wrong, but important. His latest post on LinkedIN is a follow up to his Atlantic piece on “The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence,” where he warns it’s risky to develop emotional competence. For example, he even speculates that Hitler used emotional intelligence to manipulate people into a frenzy of mindless loyalty.

Emotions Tone/Attitude Words 1. accusatory-charging of wrong doing 2. apathetic-indifferent due to lack of energy or concern 3. awe-solemn wonder 4. bitter-exhibiting strong animosity as a result of pain or grief 5. cynical-questions the basic sincerity and goodness of people Releasing Unexpressed Emotion Randi G. Fine, ContributorWaking Times “Unexpressed emotion will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.”

When We Are a Fool to Ourselves Accessing our own higher mental processes is often difficult. Psychologists have found it easy to manipulate the reasons we give for decisions, judgements or actions. Worse than this, even when we’re not actively being manipulated, we regularly fool ourselves without the need of any encouragement. Are You Empathic? 3 Types of Empathy and What They Mean You might recall President Bill Clinton's famous quote, "I feel your pain." It suggested that he had empathy and it made him seem more human and in touch with his constituents. Did he really mean it? And, is feeling someone else's pain a good thing, or a bad thing? Psychologist Mark Davis has suggested that there are 3 important types of empathy. Gestures and Body Language Hey there! Lots of writers liked my list of facial expressions, so I thought I would do a companion post about gestures and body language. Describing these can help readers visualize a scene and get a feel for the characters, and again, they can set up lines of dialogue so you don’t have a string of he said, she said, he asked, she exclaimed, etc., running down the page. You might want to consider which gestures or what body language is typical for each of your characters.

Trigger Positive Emotions People who see the glass half-full are certainly happier than the pessimists of the world, and learning to think positively is worthwhile. However, changing the way you think can be surprisingly tricky, especially when the going gets tough. What if there were a way—a shortcut or hack—that positively affected how you feel when you just can’t seem to shake the blues? A few years ago, I came across a simple idea that has been validated in hundreds of experiments and has given rise to quick and effective exercises that can help you feel happier, avoid anxiety, increase your willpower, deepen relationships and boost confidence.

Topic: Anger Anger is an emotion characterized by antagonism toward someone or something you feel has deliberately done you wrong. Anger can be a good thing. It can give you a way to express negative feelings, for example, or motivate you to find solutions to problems. But excessive anger can cause problems. Increased blood pressure and other physical changes associated with anger make it difficult to think straight and harm your physical and mental health. Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

Emotional vs Intellectual Words I have written about persuasive writing in an article where I discuss Ethos, Logos, Pathos. Persuasive writers use words to convince the reader to listen or to act. I found this useful list of words in an interesting article called Common words that suck emotional power out of your content by John Gregory Olson. He explains how words have emotions attached to them, and that you should choose the correct ones for the response you want to elicit from your reader. Use these words if you want to get an emotional, rather than an intellectual, response from your readers.

Emotional Intensity Do you consider yourself an emotional person? If a potential friend candidly described you that way to your face, would you be flattered or disturbed? Compared to most people you know, are you stronger in the intensity and range of your feelings, milder, or somewhere in between? Whereas for centuries astute observers of the human condition have noted that people vary remarkably in this dimension — it's been the theme of many great novels — only recently have psychologists come to understand that this difference is already apparent on our first day of postnatal existence — and continues strikingly unchanged ever after. Emotional Intensity clearly plays a major role in love relationships, yet has oddly been all but ignored professionally.

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