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The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace
By Mike Poskey, ZERORISK HR, Inc. Emotional Intelligence Quotient, or EQ, is a term being used more and more within human resources departments and which is making its way into executive board rooms. This article will help shed some light on what EQ is, how it is different than personality, and how it has proven to impact the bottom line in the workplace. What is Emotional Intelligence? Emotional Intelligence Quotient is defined as a set of competencies demonstrating the ability one has to recognize his or her behaviors, moods, and impulses, and to manage them best according to the situation. Additional, though less often mentioned qualities include selection of work that is emotionally rewarding to avoid procrastination, self-doubt, and low achievement (i.e., good self-motivation and goal management) and a balance between work, home, and recreational life. "People see what they want to see." How is EQ Different from Personality? EQ Competencies that Correlate to Workplace Success Related:  EmotionEmotion

Is Emotional Intelligence Overrated? Forget IQ versus EQSix Seconds After 100 years of research, there’s little agreement on the definition of intelligence or how to measure IQ. Yet Adam Grant insists cognitive skill trumps all, and “Emotional Intelligence Is Overrated.” His critique is wrong, but important. His latest post on LinkedIN is a follow up to his Atlantic piece on “The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence,” where he warns it’s risky to develop emotional competence. For example, he even speculates that Hitler used emotional intelligence to manipulate people into a frenzy of mindless loyalty. Framing this as “IQ versus EQ” demonstrates neither. Traditional psychological research has treated emotion and cognition as separate, even competitive. Emotions Drive People That said, in the human brain, no signal is more powerful than emotion. Science is a process of mounting evidence. The Evidence for Emotional Intelligence This year, for the first time, a “big data” approach was used to assess the significance of emotional intelligence around the globe.

Trigger Positive Emotions People who see the glass half-full are certainly happier than the pessimists of the world, and learning to think positively is worthwhile. However, changing the way you think can be surprisingly tricky, especially when the going gets tough. What if there were a way—a shortcut or hack—that positively affected how you feel when you just can’t seem to shake the blues? A few years ago, I came across a simple idea that has been validated in hundreds of experiments and has given rise to quick and effective exercises that can help you feel happier, avoid anxiety, increase your willpower, deepen relationships and boost confidence. The idea dates back to the turn of the 20th century and to the work of Victorian philosopher William James. According to James’s theory, forcing your face into a smile should make you feel happy, and frowning should make you feel sad. In the late 1960s, psychologist James Laird from the University of Rochester stumbled across James’s theory and decided to test it. 1.

Emotional intelligence Emotional intelligence (EI) can be defined as the ability to monitor one's own and other people's emotions, to discriminate between different emotions and label them appropriately, and to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior.[1] There are three models of EI. The ability model, developed by Peter Salovey and John Mayer, focuses on the individual's ability to process emotional information and use it to navigate the social environment.[2] The trait model as developed by Konstantin Vasily Petrides, "encompasses behavioral dispositions and self perceived abilities and is measured through self report" [3] The final model, the mixed model is a combination of both ability and trait EI, focusing on EI being an array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance, as proposed by Daniel Goleman.[4] It has been argued that EI is either just as important as one's intelligence quotient (IQ). History[edit] Definitions[edit] Ability model[edit] Measurement[edit]

Emotional Intelligence theories This webpage is a new format for mobile/small screens. Please send your feedback if it fails to operate well. Thanks. emotional intelligence theory (EQ - Emotional Quotient) Emotional Intelligence - EQ - is a relatively recent behavioural model, rising to prominence with Daniel Goleman's 1995 Book called 'Emotional Intelligence'. Emotional Intelligence links strongly with concepts of love and spirituality: bringing compassion and humanity to work, and also to 'Multiple Intelligence' theory which illustrates and measures the range of capabilities people possess, and the fact that everybody has a value. The EQ concept argues that IQ, or conventional intelligence, is too narrow; that there are wider areas of Emotional Intelligence that dictate and enable how successful we are. Different approaches and theoretical models have been developed for Emotional Intelligence. emotional intelligence - two aspects Understanding yourself, your goals, intentions, responses, behaviour and all.

Betrayal An intimate portrayal of the dark passage through the ‘make or break’ event of intimate betrayal. This book goes beyond theory and case study to the lived experience, told from the inside out. The depth and subtly of these explorations will help you recognize the seriousness of what you are going through and encourage you to get the help you need to recover. The pain and shame of betrayal are easily denied, repressed, or simply not seen because they are unrecognized culturally. Until we see it, and own it, we cannot change it. You will find these perspectives explored: Psychological Shock & Ego Shattering We need to recognize that betrayal initiates a massive emotional and spiritual crisis that needs to be taken seriously and treated with care and attention. Betrayal described as ‘the most underrated trauma’ — a life-threatening trauma — a threat to the life of the soul, and for some to their life itself. Betrayal destroys primal trust. Mindfulness & The Neurophysiological Impact of Trauma

Human Emotions Chart - Free, Comprehensive Chart Of Emotions U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain We tend to think of reason and emotion as being two different things, but it turns out that there may not be a choice between the heart and the head. A University of Illinois team, led by neuroscience professor Aron Barbey, has made the first detailed 3D map of emotional and general intelligence in the brain, that shows a strong overlap of general and emotional intelligence. Reason and emotions aren’t opposites, but rather two types of intelligence or, perhaps, two aspects of one intelligence. Reason comes under the heading of general intelligence. There are a number of theories about how general and emotional intelligence are related. Relationships between general and emotional intelligence The study was based on computed tomography (CT) scans taken of the brains of 152 US Vietnam War veterans. The CT scans provided the first detailed 3D map of the regions of the brain associated with general and emotional intelligence. In the video below, Aron Barbey discusses the study.

Betrayal Betrayal traumatizes your body, heart and mind. It cracks open the defenses we have built to both the infantile and existential traumas built into our human nature. The overwhelm produces a massive emotional crisis, a make-or-break event. We are social creatures, wired for attachment. Sudden loss of our primary attachment always shocks and hurts and must be grieved. Intimate betrayal shatters trust: trust in yourself, in other people, in life itself. Don’t listen to people advising you to ‘move on’; this shattering is an initiation to the depths, calling for attention, first aid and ongoing care. Science is beginning to confirm the heartbreak and devastation of betrayal is not ‘all in your head,’ the stuff of romantic fantasy and adolescent pop songs. The brain is sending messages we need to listen to and respect. The good news is that recovery forces us to befriend both pain and despair. In the midst of the chaos, it hardly occurs to us that God is calling.

Contrasting and categorization of emotions The contrasting and categorisation of emotions describes how emotions are thought to relate to each other. Various recent proposals of such groupings are described in the following sections. Contrasting basic emotions[edit] The following table,[1] based on a wide review of current theories, identifies and contrasts the fundamental emotions according to a set of definite criteria. The three key criteria used include mental experiences that: have a strongly motivating subjective quality like pleasure or pain;are in response to some event or object that is either real or imagined;motivate particular kinds of behaviour. The combination of these attributes distinguish the emotions from sensations, feelings and moods. HUMAINE's proposal for EARL (Emotion Annotation and Representation Language)[edit] The emotion annotation and representation language (EARL) proposed by the Human-Machine Interaction Network on Emotion (HUMAINE) classifies 48 emotions.[2] Parrott's emotions by groups[edit]

Emotional Wiring Different in Men and Women Men and women are actually from the same planet, but scientists now have the first strong evidence that the emotional wiring of the sexes is fundamentally different. An almond-shaped cluster of neurons that processes experiences such as fear and aggression hooks up to contrasting brain functions in men and women at rest, the new research shows. For men, the cluster "talks with" brain regions that help them respond to sensors for what's going on outside the body, such as the visual cortex and an area that coordinates motor actions. For women, the cluster communicates with brain regions that help them respond to sensors inside the body, such as the insular cortex and hypothalamus. "Throughout evolution, women have had to deal with a number of internal stressors, such as childbirth, that men haven't had to experience," said study co-author Larry Cahill of the University of California Irvine. Cahill and his co-author Lisa Kilpatrick, scanned the brains of 36 healthy men and 36 healthy women.

List of Emotions 7 ways to practice emotional first aid You put a bandage on a cut or take antibiotics to treat an infection, right? No questions asked. In fact, questions would be asked if you didn’t apply first aid when necessary. So why isn’t the same true of our mental health? Pay attention to emotional pain — recognize it when it happens and work to treat it before it feels all-encompassing. Yes, practicing emotional hygiene takes a little time and effort, but it will seriously elevate your entire quality of life. See Guy Winch’s TED Talk, Why we all need to practice emotional first aid.

The Neuroscience of Self-Esteem, Self-Criticism and Self-Compassion All the emphasis on self-esteem building in recent decades has done little to instruct people on what to do when they hit a bump in the road. Most of us, research shows, unleash our inner critic – even if the hardship is brought on by age, illness or another inevitable part of life. Recently, scientists such as Paul Gilbert of Kingsway Hospital in the United Kingdom and Kristin Neff of the University of Texas at Austin, have suggested being self-compassionate, rather than self-critical, especially in rough times, is more likely to help us rebound and may lead to greater success and happiness in the long run. This is not just semantics or new-age feel-good fluff. The "drive" system Likely linked to self-esteem, this system, which is thought to rely heavily on dopamine, compels us to pursue resources, mates, skills, status and so on, Gilbert told LiveScience. The threat-protection system For many of us, these first two systems dominate. Luckily, there is another option (and another system).

Basic Emotions Explanations > Emotions > Basic Emotions List of emotions | So what List of emotions What are the basic emotions? Here is a deeper list of emotions as described in Shaver et al. (2001), where emotions were categorised into a short tree structure. There are also moves to minimize the number of basic emotions. Learn to recognise emotions at increasing levels of detail. See also Plutchik's Ten Postulates Ekman, P. (1972). Ekman, P., Friesen, W. Frijda, N. Gray, J. Izard, C. Jack, R.E., Garrod, O.G.B and Schyns, P.G. James, W. (1884). McDougall, W. (1926). Oatley, K., & Johnson-Laird, P. Ortony, A., & Turner, T. Panksepp, J. (1982). Parrott, W. (2001), Emotions in Social Psychology, Psychology Press, Philadelphia Plutchik, R. (1980). Shaver, P., Schwartz, J., Kirson, D., & O'Connor, C. (2001).

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