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Being Defensive

Being Defensive

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/being-defensive/

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Don't sacrifice other relationships for the sake of your introvert A reader writes: I've been in a great relationship with my boyfriend for 2½ years. I love him. But lately, my friends have been causing some friction between us. We used to attend parties my friends invited us to. Yes, I Can! by Robin Nixon In my book Creative Visualization For Dummies I introduce a useful visual device I call a Wheel of Emotion, which I think you will find helpful in any personal improvement program. It has a similar name to another design, the Wheel of Emotions, by Robert Plutchik so, because he thought of his wheel (or, more precisely, cone) first, let’s take a look at that first: Plutchik’s Wheel of Emotions With this diagram Plutchik demonstrates a selection of major human emotions, how they are related to each other, and how they are different too (or bipolar as he calls the emotions at opposite sides). At the center of this wheel there are eight basic emotions (as he refers to them) such as ecstacy and grief. Then each of these is connected to two more subtle emotions that lead to what Plutchik calls the eight advanced emotions – those around the outside.

Cognitivism (psychology) In psychology, cognitivism is a theoretical framework for understanding the mind that gained credence in the 1950s. The movement was a response to behaviorism, which cognitivists said neglected to explain cognition. Cognitive psychology derived its name from the Latin cognoscere, referring to knowing and information, thus cognitive psychology is an information-processing psychology derived in part from earlier traditions of the investigation of thought and problem solving.[1][2] Behaviorists acknowledged the existence of thinking, but identified it as a behavior. Cognitivists argued that the way people think impacts their behavior and therefore cannot be a behavior in and of itself. Cognitivists later argued that thinking is so essential to psychology that the study of thinking should become its own field.[2]

Uncanny valley In an experiment involving the human lookalike robot Repliee Q2 (pictured above), the uncovered robotic structure underneath Repliee, and the actual human who was the model for Repliee, the human lookalike triggered the highest level of mirror neuron activity.[1] Etymology[edit] The term was coined by the robotics professor Masahiro Mori as Bukimi no Tani Genshō (不気味の谷現象) in 1970.[5] The hypothesis has been linked to Ernst Jentsch's concept of the "uncanny" identified in a 1906 essay "On the Psychology of the Uncanny".[6][7][8] Jentsch's conception was elaborated by Sigmund Freud in a 1919 essay entitled "The Uncanny" ("Das Unheimliche").[9] Hypothesis[edit]

NSA Devises Radio Pathway Into Computers not connected to the internet By DAVID E. SANGER and THOM SHANKER WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the United States to conduct surveillance on those machines and can also create a digital highway for launching cyberattacks. While most of the software is inserted by gaining access to computer networks, the N.S.A. has increasingly made use of a secret technology that enables it to enter and alter data in computers even if they are not connected to the Internet, according to N.S.A. documents, computer experts and American officials.

Giving introverts permission to be themselves Edgar, a sparkly New York socialite, was known for the engrossing tales he’d spin for guests at fundraisers he seemed to host nightly. In reality, the man would spend much of the day ahead of each party jotting down anecdotes on index cards, a nervous habit he’d developed in college. Edgar the social maven was actually a closet introvert: “I’d much rather sit and read and think about things than talk to people,” he told Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.

Basic Emotions Basic Emotions Many psychologists have claimed that certain emotions are more basic than others, often for very different reasons. According to the PEN Model, emotions arise as aspects of a person's personality. Existential therapy Background[edit] The starting point of existential philosophy (see Warnock, 1970; Macquarrie, 1972; Mace, 1999; Van Deurzen and Kenward, 2005) can be traced back to the nineteenth century and the work of Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche. Both were in conflict with the predominant ideologies of their time and committed to the exploration of reality as it can be experienced in a passionate and personal manner. Kierkegaard (1813–55) protested vigorously against popular misunderstanding and abuse of Christian dogma and the so-called 'objectivity' of science (Kierkegaard, 1841, 1844). He thought that both were ways of avoiding the anxiety inherent in human existence. He had great contempt for the way in which life was being lived by those around him and believed that truth could ultimately only be discovered subjectively by the individual in action.

Why we should rethink what we've been told about consciousness Consciousness is one of the great mysteries of science – perhaps the greatest mystery. We all know we have it, when we think, when we dream, when we savour tastes and aromas, when we hear a great symphony, when we fall in love: it is surely the most intimate, the most sapient, the most personal part of ourselves. Yet no one can claim to have understood and explained it completely. There’s no doubt it’s associated with the brain in some way but the nature of that association is far from clear. How do these three pounds of material stuff inside our skulls allow us to have experiences?

The 3 rules of a secure cell phone Big brother is coming after your phone. The government is increasingly interested in your calls, your movements, and your purchases. Don’t believe me?

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