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The Worlds of David Darling

The Worlds of David Darling
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Meteorite older than Solar System Organic globules found in the Tagish Lake meteorite fragments may predate the solar system, according to a new U.S. study Credit: University of Calgary SYDNEY: A meteorite discovered in Canada may be older than the Solar System, according to a new U.S. study. Samples taken from the Tagish Lake meteorite, discovered in 2000, have revealed evidence of organic matter that predates our Sun and Solar System, according to the study, published in today’s edition of the U.S. journal Science. According to the researchers, the meteorite most likely originated at the outer regions of the Kuiper Belt or in the cold molecular cloud that gave birth to the Solar System. When analysing the meteorite, the team, led by Keiko Nakamura-Messenger, of the NASA/Johnson Space Center in Texas, discovered “globules” inside it consisting of simple organic compounds with carbon-rich outer layers. The isotopic ratios showed that the globules formed at temperatures of about minus 260°C – close to absolute zero.

Nothingness: Why nothing matters Our pursuit of naught provides profound insights into the nature of reality Read more: "The nature of nothingness" SHAKESPEARE had it right, even in ways he couldn't have imagined. For centuries, scientists have indeed been making much ado about nothing - and with good reason. Nothing, or rather what we've long taken to be nothing, may be the key to understanding everything from why particles have mass to the expansion of the universe. As explored in this special issue of New Scientist (see "The nature of nothingness"), nothing is a rich and subtle subject whose biography is far from finished. The modern story of nothing began with a thought experiment dreamed up by Isaac Newton. With that answer, Newton made something out of nothing. The discovery of quantum mechanics took the story of nothing further still. This year's Nobel prize in physics recognises the power of nothing on cosmic scales. Profile New Scientist Not just a website! More From New Scientist More from the web (YouTube)

Russia to join European Mars mission MOSCOW, April 6 (UPI) -- Russia's space agency Roscosmos said it has agreed to participate in a Mars research project with the European Space Agency. The announcement came following a meeting between Roscosmos head Vladimir Popovkin and ESA chief Jean-Jacques Dordain in Moscow Friday. "The sides consider this project feasible and promising," Popovkin's spokeswoman Anna Vedishcheva told RIA Novosti. The final agreement on Russia's participation in ExoMars is expected to be signed in November "and by this date the sides should confirm their financing," a space industry source told RIA Novosti. The ExoMars program to send an orbiter to Mars in 2016 and a robot rover two years later was a joint project of NASA and ESA, but NASA has scaled back its participation amidst budget cutbacks and will not provide its Atlas rocket for the mission launches. Russia's participation in the project was approved Friday by the space council of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

10 Best Foods and Drinks for Exercising You know exercise is key if you want to stay fit. But did you know that what you eat and drink can help you reach your fitness goals faster? By feeding your body the right nutrients you can ensure it’s getting the raw materials it needs to help you power through your workout and build and repair muscle afterward. Jumpstart your exercise program with these 10 essential food and drinks. OatmealWhen it comes to priming your muscles for a workout, carbs are your best friend. CoffeeIf you’re a java junkie we have happy news for you. OystersThese mollusks are loaded with iron, needed to build hemoglobin, which delivers oxygen throughout your body. AlmondsIt may sound counterintuitive, but the more intensely you exercise the more damaging free radicals your body produces. RaisinsSkip the energy bar and fuel up with a small box of raisins instead. WaterThink you need a sports drink during or after exercise? SalmonIf you’re pumping iron, salmon could make you stronger. Your thoughts...

Accelerating Future » 10 Interesting Futuristic Materials 1. Aerogel Aerogel holds 15 entries in the Guinness Book of Records, including "best insulator", and "lowest-density solid". 2. Carbon nanotubes are chains of carbon held together by the strongest bond in all chemistry, the sacred sp2 bond, even stronger than the sp3 bonds that hold together diamond. 3. "Metamaterial" refers to any material that gains its properties from its microscopic structure rather than bulk composition. 4. We're starting to lay down thick layers of diamond in CVD machines, hinting towards a future of bulk diamond machinery. 5. Diamonds may be strong, but aggregated diamond nanorods (ADNRs) are stronger. 6. Amorphous metals, also called metallic glasses, consist of metal with a disordered atomic structure. 7. A superalloy is a generic term for a metal that can operate at very high temperatures, up to about 2000 °F (1100 °C). 8. Metal foam is what you get when you add a foaming agent, powdered titanium hydride, to molten aluminum, then let it cool. 9. 10.

NASA and NSF-Funded Research Finds First Potentially Habitable Exoplanet NASA and NSF-Funded Research Finds First Potentially Habitable Exoplanet A team of planet hunters from the University of California (UC) Santa Cruz, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington has announced the discovery of a planet with three times the mass of Earth orbiting a nearby star at a distance that places it squarely in the middle of the star's "habitable zone." This discovery was the result of more than a decade of observations using the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii, one of the world's largest optical telescopes. To astronomers, a "potentially habitable" planet is one that could sustain life, not necessarily one where humans would thrive. The new findings are based on 11 years of observations of the nearby red dwarf star Gliese 581using the HIRES spectrometer on the Keck I Telescope. "Keck's long-term observations of the wobble of nearby stars enabled the detection of this multi-planetary system," said Mario R. Related Links:

La relativité - 1,2,3,4, dimensions La théorie de la Relativité Concepts fondamentaux Corpus théorique (I) Avant de poursuivre cette initiation à la relativité, il est indispensable d'introduire quelques rudiments de mathématiques afin de fourbir votre esprit avec la meilleure arme intellectuelle qui soit pour comprendre la suite du récit. Il faut en effet à présent définir quelques notions fondamentales, quitte à devoir faire usage d’un peu de symbolique mathématique. J’ai tout imaginé pour vous éviter cette partie “dure” du sujet , en tous cas sa partie nettement moins littéraire, c’est-à-dire les définitions du cadre relativiste; mais à mesure que je relisais ce passage tout en le rédigeant, je me suis finalement rendu compte que s’il y avait une chose sur laquelle il fallait bien insister quand on apprend une nouvelle matière, c’était par définition les notions de bases. 1,2, 3, 4 dimensions Nous savons que l’Univers est une construction multidimensionnelle. A lire : Flatland, E.Abbott, 1884 (PDF) Vecteur, champ et tenseur

logy Magazine In new research, scientists have attempted to determine the precise conditions necessary for planets to form in a star system. Jarrett Johnson and Hui Li of Los Alamos National Laboratory assert that observations increasingly suggest that planet formation takes place in star systems with higher metallicities. Astronomers use the term “metallicity” in reference to elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, such as oxygen, silicon, and iron. In the “core accretion” model of planetary formation, a rocky core gradually forms when dust grains that make up the disk of material that surrounds a young star bang into each other to create small rocks known as “planetesimals”. Additionally, evidence suggests that the circumstellar disks of dust that surround young stars don’t survive as long when the stars have lower metallicities. The Planet Epoch Our cosmic history has several defining “epochs”, one of which is the point at which star systems began to form planets. The Lifetime of Dust

Welcome 2012! New Year's Around the World - Alan Taylor - In Focus As midnight marched across the world's time zones last night, people welcomed the start of a new year, ushering out the old and toasting the new. From Beijing to Moscow, Beirut to Paris, and London to New York, parties, fireworks and festivals welcomed 2012, the Year of the Dragon in the Chinese Lunar Calendar. Gathered here are images from these celebrations last night, and the many people who took part. Use j/k keys or ←/→ to navigate Choose: Fireworks light up the London skyline and Big Ben just after midnight on January 1, 2012, in London, England. A couple watches the last rays of sunlight for 2011 at sunset from the waters off Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Hawaii, on December 31, 2011. A giant dragon lantern is displayed to celebrate the New Year near the border village of Panmunjom (DMZ) that separates the two Koreas since the Korean War, at Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea, Sunday, January 1, 2012. A capacity crowd fills the Cathedral Church of St.

Nanotech breakthrough: get ready for graphene The exciting one-atom thick super material can now be produced in ample quantities and high quality. Rapid improvements in nanotechnology are now expected. Technology improvements are about to get dramatically ultra-fast. Exciting sustaining and disruptive innovations are on the way for just about every digital appliance, from touchscreen tablet computing to solar cells, according to a Science Daily report. Graphene is a new form of carbon, one atom in thickness, extremely strong and highly conducive. High performance can be achieved with graphene transistors that can operate at much faster speeds and in higher heat conditions compared to current silicon chip technology. Read more... The result?

Orion Nebula | Alien Worlds: Shedding light on our unearthly universe We've been enraptured by this most eye-catching of constellations since ancient times. It's a beautiful sight that dominates our winter skies in northern latitudes. The constellation was named after Orion the Hunter, a character in Greek mythology. But those ancient stargazers could never have dreamt of the tremendous details that modern astronomy has uncovered about this star system. Story continues below animation. Download this animation from iTunes U © 2003 Torsten BrongerReproduced under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Wikimedia Commons, 2008 The ‘right shoulder’ of the ‘hunter’ is a star called Betelgeuse (sometimes pronounced ‘Beetlejuice’, but that's probably not the most correct way of saying it). It's very likely that Betelgeuse will soon explode and become a spectacular supernova. The constellation's ‘left knee’ is the brilliant blue star called Rigel. But perhaps the jewel in the crown is Orion's great nebula. © C.R.

Hubble's Panoramic View Several million stars are vying for attention in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of a raucous stellar breeding ground in 30 Doradus, located in the heart of the Tarantula nebula. 30 Doradus is the brightest star-forming region in our galactic neighbourhood and home to the most massive stars ever seen. The nebula resides 170 000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small, satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. No known star-forming region in our galaxy is as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. The image comprises one of the largest mosaics ever assembled from Hubble photos and consists of observations taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, combined with observations from the European Southern Observatory’s MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope that trace the location of glowing hydrogen and oxygen. The image is being released to celebrate Hubble’s 22nd anniversary. The colours come from the glowing hot gas that dominates regions of the image. Notes

Stellarium Wire Sculpture Coup de coeur pour les étonnants travaux de l’artiste Gavin Worth avec ces différentes sculptures en fil de fer. Actuellement basé à San Francisco, il conçoit à partir de 2 mètres de fil des oeuvres et des profils de personnages. A découvrir sur son portfolio et dans la suite de l’article.

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