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7 Theories on Time That Would Make Doc Brown's Head Explode

7 Theories on Time That Would Make Doc Brown's Head Explode
There are a few things in this world that we can always rely on as constants: The sun will always rise each morning, the seasons will always change and time will inevitably march forward at its predictable clip. Except the sun doesn't actually rise, seasons are disappearing and time ... well, see, time is tricky, too. For example ... #7. We May Not Live in the Present What if we told you that what you think of as "the present" is actually slightly in the past? The delay isn't much -- what's 80 milliseconds between you and your brain? Photos.com"Being a brain is kind of boring, but we've got lots of time for pranks." But that's not the freaky part. Photos.com"You really don't want to see the copies." Not convinced? The bizarre real-world implication is that the taller you are, the further back you live in the past, since it takes longer for the information to travel through your body -- and if you're a little person, you live closer to the present. #6. Photos.com"Finally! #5. #4. Related:  COOL Space-ScienceTempus Fugit

How Many Dimensions Does the Universe Really Have? - The Nature of Reality An engineer, a mathematician and a physicist walk into a universe. How many dimensions do they find? The engineer whips out a protractor and straightedge. That’s easy, she says. The mathematician gets out his notepad and creates a list of regular, symmetric geometric shapes with perpendicular sides. Credit: Sven Geier/Flickr, under a Creative Commons license. Finally it is the physicist’s turn. Let’s see how she reached her conclusions. In 1917, Austrian physicist Paul Ehrenfest wrote a thought-provoking piece, “In what way does it become manifest in the fundamental laws of physics that space has three dimensions?” He noted, for example, that the stable orbits of planets in the solar system and the stationary states of electrons in atoms require inverse-squared force laws. Let’s think of what an inverse-squared law means. The universe is not just space, though. Light stems from electromagnetic interactions, one of the four natural forces. Go DeeperEditor’s picks for further reading

Virginia Woolf on the Elasticity of Time Long before psychologists had any insight into our warped perception of time — for instance, why it slows down when we’re afraid, speeds up as we age, and gets twisted when we vacation — or understood how our mental time travel made us human, another great investigator of the human psyche captured the extraordinary elasticity of time not in science but in art. In Orlando: A Biography (public library) — her subversive 1928 masterwork, regarded as “the longest and most charming love letter in literature,” which also gave us her insight into the dance of self-doubt in creative work — Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882–March 28, 1941) writes: Time, unfortunately, though it makes animals and vegetables bloom and fade with amazing punctuality, has no such simple effect upon the mind of man. The mind of man, moreover, works with equal strangeness upon the body of time. Life piles up so fast that I have no time to write out the equally fast rising mound of reflections.

Scientists create the first digital 'tree of life' Scientists from 11 organizations have digitized a “tree of life,” a genetic map of 2.3 million named species of animals, plants, fungi and microbes that all branched off over time from a common ancestor. In a September 18 paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers wrote that "The Open Tree Taxonomy" is likely the first to aggregate tens of thousands of already published smaller trees into a comprehensive map of all life. The digital tree is free for anyone to use and update on opentreeoflife.org. In what looks like a kaleidoscope of rainbow-colored high-rises, the latest digital diagram depicts the evolution of living things since the beginning of life on Earth more than 3.5 billion years ago. And because scientists believe that all life on Earth shares a common genetic ancestor, understanding how millions of species are related helps them improve agricultural methods and better understand viruses, the research team says.

Clocks Metric (or Decimalized) Time The day is divided into 100 parts (centidays), plus decimal fraction. Think of it as a percent of the day. The "Universal Metric Time" is based on the International Date Line. Much more information at my Guide to Metric (or Decimilized) Time. Hexadecimal Time The day is divided up into 65536 parts and written in hexadecimal (base-16) notation (A=10, B=11 ... Much more information about this can be found at Intuitor Hexadecimal Headquarters. Octal Time Octal Time uses a base-8 system (digits 0-7). Base64 Time Base-64 uses ASCII characters (in ascending order: A-Z, a-z, 0-1, +, and /). Binary Time Like hexadecimal time, the day is divided into 65536 parts, only we display it as a binary number using squares for bits, here using dark squares to represent 1 and white for 0. This can be viewed as a variation of hexadecimal time by dividing it into four 2x2 blocks of squares, each block corresponds to a digit of hexadecimal time. Mayan Time

Here Come The Nanobots A team of New York University researchers has taken a major step in building a more robust, controllable machine from DNA, the genetic material of all living organisms. Constructed from synthetic DNA molecules, the device improves upon previously developed nano-scale DNA devices because it allows for better-controlled movement within larger DNA constructs. The researchers say that the new device may help build the foundation for the development of sophisticated machines at a molecular scale, ultimately evolving to the development of nano-robots that might some day build new molecules, computer circuits or fight infectious diseases. The research team was led by NYU chemistry professor Nadrian C. Seeman. Professor Seeman has led research teams to previous breakthroughs in the construction of structures and devices from DNA molecules. These findings are reported in a letter to Nature entitled "A Robust DNA Mechanical Device Controlled by Hybridization Topology."

Why England Was A Year Behind Belgium, Spain and Italy for 170 Years William Hogarth's satirical painting, "An Election Entertainment" (1755), includes the words "Give us back our eleven days!" (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons) In 1584 a violent, angry crowd ransacked the city of Augsburg, Germany. Citizens broke through thick windows and shot their guns into the street. They were marching to City Hall to make it clear that they would not take the authorities’ new plans sitting down. The people of Augsburg weren’t just upset that their calendar was being changed, which would skip birthdays and ruin weekends. The marketplace in Ausburg, Germany in 1550. In The Reformation in Germany, C. A riot was the only way to go, or so thought some 16th century Augsburgers. The reasons for the calendar change, in an astronomical sense, were less sinister than the people of Augsburg assumed; Aloysius Lilius, the astronomer who proposed the project, was just trying to improve the dating system begun by Julius Caesar.

Report on Nanobots (Nanotechnology Robots) Time Zones Space Time Travel – Relativity Visualized The Psychology of Time and the Paradox of How Impulsivity and Self-Control Mediate Our Capacity for Presence “Reality is never and nowhere more accessible than in the immediate moment of one’s own life,” Kafka once told a teenage friend. “It’s only there that it can be won or lost.” The great Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky believed that what draws us to film is the gift of time — “time lost or spent or not yet had.” From the moment we are born to the moment we take our last breath, we battle with reality under the knell of this constant awareness that we are either winning or losing time. We long for what T.S. These multiple and contradictory dimensions of time is what German psychologist Marc Wittmann explores in Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time (public library) — a fascinating inquiry into how our subjective experience of time’s passage shapes everything from our emotional memory to our sense of self. One of Wittmann’s most pause-giving points has to do with how temporality mediates the mind-body problem. In a sense, time is a construction of our consciousness.

Faster then light travel to be rechecked in May 2012 UPDATE 8 June 2012 Neutrinos sent from CERN to Gran Sasso respect the cosmic speed limit At the 25th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics in Kyoto today, CERN Research Director Sergio Bertolucci presented results on the time of flight of neutrinos from CERN to the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratory on behalf of four experiments situated at Gran Sasso. “Although this result isn’t as exciting as some would have liked,” said Bertolucci, “it is what we all expected deep down. In another development reported in Kyoto, the OPERA experiment showed evidence for the appearance of a second tau-neutrino in the CERN muon-neutrino beam, this is an important step towards understanding the science of neutrino oscillations. UPDATE 16 March 2012 ICARUS experiment at Gran Sasso laboratory reports new measurement of neutrino time of flight consistent with the speed of light The ICARUS experiment has independent timing from OPERA and measured seven neutrinos in the beam from CERN last year.

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