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The Largest Black Holes in the Universe

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Speed of the Milky Way in Space As we all know, a galaxy is a massive ensemble of hundreds of millions of stars. The galaxy where we live in today is called the Milky Way. The name itself came from the ancient Greek galaxies kyklos, or ring of milk, due to its faint milky appearance. Our Milky Way is a large spiral galaxy. Ever since four hundred years ago the settlement that the Earth is moving about the sun, and one hundred and fifty years ago that the sun is moving about the center of the Galaxy, it shouldn't be surprising if we learned that the Galaxy is also moving. In 1928, an American astronomer Milton La Salle Humason found a galaxy that was receding at a speed of 3,800 km/s, and by 1936, when he observed the same galaxy again, he found it receding at a speed of 40,000 km/s. If our galaxy exerted a repulsive force, that force should be felt with the local groups, however it wasn't. In conclusion, galaxies experience neutral attractions on one other. Patricia Kong -- 1999 Burstein, David.

Java Generics FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions All text and content found at URLs starting with (collectively, "the Java Generics FAQ") are the sole property of Angelika Langer. Copyright @ 2004-2019 by Angelika Langer . All rights reserved. Except as specifically granted below, you may not modify, copy, publish, sell, display, transmit (in any form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), adapt, distribute, store in a retrieval system, create derivative works, or in any other way use or exploit the contents of the Java Generics FAQ, without the prior consent of the author. All rights, titles and interest, including copyrights and other applicable intellectual property rights, in any of the material belongs to the provider of the material. You do not acquire proprietary interest in such materials by accessing them on my web site. In particular, I do NOT grant permission to copy the Java Generics FAQ or any part of it to a public Web server.

Laboratory Equipment What Is a Black Hole? An artist's drawing a black hole named Cygnus X-1. It formed when a large star caved in. This black hole pulls matter from blue star beside it. A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light can not get out. The gravity is so strong because matter has been squeezed into a tiny space. Because no light can get out, people can't see black holes. How Big Are Black Holes? Another kind of black hole is called "stellar." An artist's drawing shows the current view of the Milky Way galaxy. The largest black holes are called "supermassive." How Do Black Holes Form? Stellar black holes are made when the center of a very big star falls in upon itself, or collapses. Scientists think supermassive black holes were made at the same time as the galaxy they are in. This image of the center of the Milky Way galaxy was taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Image Credit: NASA/CXC/MIT/F.K. If Black Holes Are "Black," How Do Scientists Know They Are There? Image Credit:

How fast is our galaxy moving through space "The Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxy are approaching each other with a speed of 300,000 miles per hour." or 130 km/s As we all know, a galaxy is a massive ensemble of hundreds of millions of stars. Ever since four hundred years ago the settlement that the Earth is moving about the sun, and one hundred and fifty years ago that the sun is moving about the center of the Galaxy, it shouldn't be surprising if we learned that the Galaxy is also moving. In 1928, an American astronomer Milton La Salle Humason found a galaxy that was receding at a speed of 3,800 km/s, and by 1936, when he observed the same galaxy again, he found it receding at a speed of 40,000 km/s. If our galaxy exerted a repulsive force, that force should be felt with the local groups, however it wasn't. In conclusion, galaxies experience neutral attractions on one other.

Multi-Agent Transport Simulation | MATSim Optics, Lasers, Imaging & Fiber Information Resource Black hole A black hole is defined as a region of spacetime from which gravity prevents anything, including light, from escaping.[1] The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass will deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2] Around a black hole, there is a mathematically defined surface called an event horizon that marks the point of no return. The hole is called "black" because it absorbs all the light that hits the horizon, reflecting nothing, just like a perfect black body in thermodynamics.[3][4] Quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit radiation like a black body with a finite temperature. This temperature is inversely proportional to the mass of the black hole, making it difficult to observe this radiation for black holes of stellar mass or greater. Objects whose gravity fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. History General relativity

NASA finds extra-terrestrial amino-acids in Sudan meteorites Earlier this month, NASA announced the discovery of bacteria living in arsenic in a California lake. Now they have uncovered ET amino-acids in meteorite fragments that landed in northern Sudan. The meteorite was a fragment of a parent asteroid measuring 13-feet-wide (4m), and weighing 59-tons. Read more... Amino-acids have been found in carbon-rich meteorites before but this is the first time the acid substances have been found in a meteorite as hot as 2,000 Fahrenheit (1,100c). Ten 100-year predictions that came true 11 January 2012Last updated at 00:09 By Tom Geoghegan BBC News Magazine John Watkins predicted Americans would be taller, tanks would exist and C, X and Q would no longer feature in our everyday alphabet In 1900, an American civil engineer called John Elfreth Watkins made a number of predictions about what the world would be like in 2000. How did he do? As is customary at the start of a new year, the media have been full of predictions about what may happen in the months ahead. But a much longer forecast made in 1900 by a relatively unknown engineer has been recirculating in the past few days. In December of that year, at the start of the 20th Century, John Elfreth Watkins wrote a piece published on page eight of an American women's magazine, Ladies' Home Journal, entitled What May Happen in the Next Hundred Years. Watkins was a writer for the Journal's sister magazine, the Saturday Evening Post, based in Indianapolis. It was picked up and caused some excitement on Twitter. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

The Society of Vacuum Coaters

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