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Future Exploration Network

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Humans will be extinct in 100 years says eminent scientist (PhysOrg.com) -- Eminent Australian scientist Professor Frank Fenner, who helped to wipe out smallpox, predicts humans will probably be extinct within 100 years, because of overpopulation, environmental destruction and climate change. Fenner, who is emeritus professor of microbiology at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, said homo sapiens will not be able to survive the population explosion and “unbridled consumption,” and will become extinct, perhaps within a century, along with many other species. United Nations official figures from last year estimate the human population is 6.8 billion, and is predicted to pass seven billion next year. Fenner told The Australian he tries not to express his pessimism because people are trying to do something, but keep putting it off. Fenner said that climate change is only at its beginning, but is likely to be the cause of our extinction. “We’ll undergo the same fate as the people on Easter Island,” he said.

The Next Net Why a Decentralized Network? The moment the "net neutrality" debate began was the moment the net neutrality debate was lost. For once the fate of a network -- its fairness, its rule set, its capacity for social or economic reformation -- is in the hands of policymakers and the corporations funding them -- that network loses its power to effect change. The mere fact that lawmakers and lobbyists now control the future of the net should be enough to turn us elsewhere.

Cosmopolitanism Cosmopolitanism is the ideology that all human beings belong to a single community, based on a shared morality. A person who adheres to the idea of cosmopolitanism in any of its forms is called a cosmopolitan or cosmopolite. A cosmopolitan community might be based on an inclusive morality, a shared economic relationship, or a political structure that encompasses different nations. In a cosmopolitan community individuals from different places (e.g. nation-states) form relationships of mutual respect. As an example, Kwame Anthony Appiah suggests the possibility of a cosmopolitan community in which individuals from varying locations (physical, economic, etc.) enter relationships of mutual respect despite their differing beliefs (religious, political, etc.).[1]

P2P Futures for Futures Studies Jose Ramos proposes six paths: 1. Communion in diversity THE FUTURIST Magazine Releases Its Top 10 Forecasts for 2013 and Beyond Each year since 1985, the editors of THE FUTURIST have selected the most thought-provoking ideas and forecasts appearing in the magazine to go into our annual Outlook report. Over the years, Outlook has spotlighted the emergence of such epochal developments as the Internet, virtual reality, the 2008 financial crisis and the end of the Cold War. But these forecasts are meant as conversation starters, not absolute predictions about the future. We hope that this report--covering developments in business and economics, demography, energy, the environment, health and medicine, resources, society and values, and technology--inspires you to tackle the challenges, and seize the opportunities, of the coming decade. With no further ado, THE FUTURIST Magazine releases its top ten forecasts for 2013 and beyond.

Will the Future of the Internet Be Decided By Hollywood? Hollywood lobbyists are pressuring the US Congress to pass a major legislative reform, which would provide for the systematic filtering and blocking of sites suspected of encouraging piracy of copyrighted works. This Wednesday, November 16, the members of the House of Representatives will gather to consider the Stop Online Privacy Act (SOPA) bill. (This legislation) would mean the end of the Internet as we know it. Democrat Zoe Lofgren, the elected representative for Silicon Valley, spoke of the “many prominent human rights activists and Internet engineers (who) have voiced concerns” which she believes “deserve serious consideration”.

neuroscience of Imagination Albert Einstein said of the theory of relativity, "I thought of it while riding my bicycle." Anyone who exercises regularly knows that your thinking process changes when you are walking, jogging, biking, swimming, riding the elliptical trainer, etc. New ideas tend to bubble up and crystallize when you are inside the aerobic zone. You are able to connect the dots and problem solve with a cognitive flexibility that you don't have when you are sitting at your desk. This is a universal phenomenon, but one that neuroscientists are just beginning to understand.

Accelerating Future There isn’t enough in the world. Not enough wealth to go around, not enough space in cities, not enough medicine, not enough intelligence or wisdom. Not enough genuine fun or excitement. Not enough knowledge. Not enough solutions to global problems. What we need is more . Futuring: The Exploration of the Future Futuring: The Exploration of the Future by Edward Cornish. WFS. 2004. 313 pages.

Future Scenarios What Will The Internet Look Like In 10 Years? The Internet Society engaged in a scenario planning exercise to reveal plausible courses of events that could impact the health of the Internet in the future. While obviously not intended to be a definitive overview of the landscape or all potential issues, we believe the results are interesting and, we hope, thought-provoking. We are sharing them in the hope that they will inspire thought about possibilities for the future development of the Internet, and involvement in helping to make that happen in the best possible way. Future Scenario Resources Besides viewing the video scenarios below, you can:

Law Library: IGOs & NGOs Research Guide This guide provides background information on IGOs and NGOs and features mega-lists of IGOs and NGOs for finding sources quickly. Introduction This guide provides you with brief background information on IGOs and NGOs and features mega-lists of IGOs and NGOs for finding sources quickly online. Print sources and other research guides are also included.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means and how to respond We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before. We do not yet know just how it will unfold, but one thing is clear: the response to it must be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders of the global polity, from the public and private sectors to academia and civil society.

Futurology: The tricky art of knowing what will happen next 23 December 2010Last updated at 02:38 By Finlo Rohrer BBC News Magazine Cheap air travel was among the predictions (illustration from Geoffrey Hoyle's book) A 1972 book which predicts what life would be like in 2010 has been reprinted after attracting a cult following, but how hard is it to tell the future? Geoffrey Hoyle is often asked why he predicted everybody would be wearing jumpsuits by 2010. He envisioned a world where everybody worked a three-day week and had their electric cars delivered in tubes of liquid. These colourful ideas from his 1972 children's book, 2010: Living in the Future, helped prompt a Facebook campaign to track him down.

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