background preloader

Your Sky

Your Sky
by John Walker Welcome to Your Sky, the interactive planetarium of the Web. You can produce maps in the forms described below for any time and date, viewpoint, and observing location. If you enter the orbital elements of an asteroid or comet, Your Sky will compute its current position and plot it on the map. Each map is accompanied by an ephemeris for the Sun, Moon, planets, and any tracked asteroid or comet. A control panel permits customisation of which objects are plotted, limiting magnitudes, colour scheme, image size, and other parameters; each control is linked to its description in the help file. Your Sky provides three ways to view the sky with links, where appropriate, among the various presentations. Sky Map The sky map shows the entire sky as viewed from a given location at a specified time and date. Horizon Views Horizon Views, showing the stars above the horizon as seen from a specified observing site at a given date and time. The Virtual Telescope Your Sky help Related Software Related:  Universe & Multiverse

Space.com Buy This Infographic as a Full-Size Poster Astronomers have discovered more than 700 alien planets beyond the solar system, and the count is rising all the time. Some are large and hot, and others are smaller and cooler, but scientists are still on the lookout for an Earth twin. They just got closer, with the announcement Dec. 5 of a planet found by NASA's Kepler space telescope to lie in the habitable zone around its star where liquid water, and perhaps life, could exist. You can purchase a 20"x60" poster of this SPACE.com infographic on high-quality 14G Photo Paper from the SPACE.com store here: Buy Poster Embed: Paste the code below into your site. <a href=" alt="Astronomers searching for another Earth are getting closer, thanks to recent discoveries by the Kepler space telescope. " src="

Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky Directory of Royal Genealogical Data At this site I have a database containing the genealogy of the British Royal family and those linked to it via blood or marriage relationships. It contains, in fact, the genealogy of almost every ruling house in the western world because of the intermarriage that took place between them at some time or another. There are in excess of 30,000 individuals from the earliest times to the present in the database. The date spread of the records is available for those interested, as well as statistics on the ten most popular monarchs , and the most prolific readers top 10. The data may be browsed in several different ways. A new (July 99) feature is a list of chronological implausibilities identified by an automatic scan of the data. For further details on sources see the bibliography and also User Contributed Data Files . You may also find the Answers to Frequestly Asked Questions useful. This work is Copyright © 1994-2005 Brian C Tompsett. Brian Tompsett Department of Computer Science Addendum:

Terraforming Transplanting seas to inland ocean lakes? A good idea for the Middle East? The two century-old and highly respected Japanese engineering giant Shimizu has hatched a wild and crazy proposal to rehabilitate the desert for human use. Their idea is to move vast amounts of seawater along canals that would track deep into desert landmasses to create a series of connected huge inland seas measuring 30 km (18 miles) across. Each seawater lake with its city would spaced apart along connecting canals measuring 150 km (93 miles) between each seawater lake city. A similarly massive water project initiated by Libya transfers fresh water from a distant underground aquifer. By contrast, this project uses seawater, already on the surface. To prevent it from soaking down into the sand the water in the lakes would be retained by a continuous, two-meter-thick underground wall that reaches down to the impermeable layer, (presumably protected with rebar against earthquake). Image:Shimizu Corporation

Hubble's Panoramic View Several million stars are vying for attention in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of a raucous stellar breeding ground in 30 Doradus, located in the heart of the Tarantula nebula. 30 Doradus is the brightest star-forming region in our galactic neighbourhood and home to the most massive stars ever seen. The nebula resides 170 000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small, satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. No known star-forming region in our galaxy is as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. The image comprises one of the largest mosaics ever assembled from Hubble photos and consists of observations taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, combined with observations from the European Southern Observatory’s MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope that trace the location of glowing hydrogen and oxygen. The image is being released to celebrate Hubble’s 22nd anniversary. The colours come from the glowing hot gas that dominates regions of the image. Notes

The Elegant Universe: Pt 1 The Elegant Universe: Part 3 PBS Airdate: November 4, 2003 NARRATOR: Now, on NOVA, take a thrill ride into a world stranger than science fiction, where you play the game by breaking some rules, where a new view of the universe pushes you beyond the limits of your wildest imagination. This is the world of "string theory," a way of describing every force and all matter from an atom to earth, to the end of the galaxies—from the birth of time to its final tick, in a single theory, a "Theory of Everything." Our guide to this brave new world is Brian Greene, the bestselling author and physicist. BRIAN GREENE (Columbia University): And no matter how many times I come here, I never seem to get used to it. NARRATOR: Can he help us solve the greatest puzzle of modern physics—that our understanding of the universe is based on two sets of laws that don't agree? NARRATOR: Resolving that contradiction eluded even Einstein, who made it his final quest. S. BRIAN GREENE:The atmosphere was electric. S.

Ulster Ancestry The Open Biomedical Ontologies The Worlds of David Darling NASA Probe Successfully Orbiting Mercury—A First NASA made history tonight as the MESSENGER probe became the first spacecraft to orbit the tiny planet Mercury. Launched in 2004, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging mission marks the first time a craft has gone near Mercury since 1975, when NASA's Mariner 10 probe conducted flybys. (Get MESSENGER facts and figures.) For the past six and a half years MESSENGER has been maneuvering itself into an orbital path via so-called gravity assists, using the tugs from flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury itself to speed up and alter course. At 8:45 p.m. The mission control team at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland was monitoring MESSENGER's progress from 96 million miles (155 million kilometers) away. At 9:10 p.m. engineers confirmed that the burn had occurred. But the backup plans, he said, didn't involve an immedite retry and would have substantially changed the time line of the mission. Mercury Probe to Fill in Blanks

ScotlandsPeople

Related: