background preloader

The Daily Galaxy - Science, Space, Tech

The Daily Galaxy - Science, Space, Tech
Massive Earth-like planets that have both continents and oceans may be better at harboring extraterrestrial life than those that are water-only worlds. A new study gives hope for the possibility that many super-Earth planets orbiting distant stars have exposed continents rather than just water-covered surfaces. Continue reading "SuperEarths with Exposed Continents Boost Chances for Extraterrestrial Life" » In 1980 and 1981 NASA's Voyager 1 and 2 space probes passed for the first time over the planet Saturn, located 1,500 million km from the Sun. Among their numerous discoveries they observed a strange, hexagon-shaped structure in the planet's uppermost clouds surrounding its north pole. The hexagon remained virtually static, without moving, vis-à-vis the planet's overall rotation that was not accurately known. Continue reading "Saturn's Enigmatic Hexagon --"Yields Clues to the Hydrogen-Gas Giant's Hidden Atmosphere"" » Continue reading ""Where Are They?"

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/

Related:  Universe & Multiversenews

Space.com Buy This Infographic as a Full-Size Poster Astronomers have discovered more than 700 alien planets beyond the solar system, and the count is rising all the time. Some are large and hot, and others are smaller and cooler, but scientists are still on the lookout for an Earth twin. They just got closer, with the announcement Dec. 5 of a planet found by NASA's Kepler space telescope to lie in the habitable zone around its star where liquid water, and perhaps life, could exist.

40 technologies to watch in 2011 If the popular misreading of Mayan mythology is correct, we have fewer than two more years left on this Earth. That leaves precious little time for the tech industry to develop and perfect of all the cool technologies that sci-fi authors have dreamed up over the years. Still, while a December 2012 apocalypse may spell doom for the commercial viability of hovercars, it doesn't mean that the next couple of years in tech will be dull — quite the contrary. 2011 is already shaping up to be a banner year for tech and web innovation. scienceNOW Can Wind Turbines Make You Sick? Residents living in the shadows of wind turbines say the sound is making them sick. But so far the science isn't there. From NOVA Next | Jun 27, 2018

Cosmology Books and Links Note: Except for the removal of dead links, this site has not really been updated since the author retired in 2009. Some Good Books The Once and Future Cosmos (Scientific American, 2002). A reprint of the Sept. 2002 issue of Scientific American . Adams, Fred & Greg Laughlin, The Five Ages of the Universe (Free Press, Simon & Schuster, 1999). SIMBAD Astronomical Database What is SIMBAD, and what is it not ? % The purpose of Simbad is to provide information on astronomical objects of interest which have been studied in scientific articles. Simbad is a dynamic database, updated every working day. Public Library of Science: Open Access The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Most publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles must pay to access them.

30+ Accessibility Tools, Softwares & Resources for The Visually Impaired Free ebooks are meant to be read and enjoyed by everybody regardless of physical imperfections, hence why this post is being made, although I must admit that this should be the first post that should be posted here. Having said that, do join me in the journey to increase this list of resources to make it a comprehensive one, to provide and create the proper accessibility channels. I’m sure there are other list out there which covers some of the areas below, but I do hope this post will somehow be a part of the whole effort in making this a reality. Audio Ebooks Been covered here, 35 total sites found so far providing free downloadable audio ebooks. Adobe Reader 9 Accessibility

Orders of magnitude (radiation) The following table includes some dosages for comparison purposes, using millisieverts (mSv) (one thousandth of a sievert). The concept of radiation hormesis is relevant to this table – radiation hormesis is a hypothesis stating that the effects of a given acute dose may differ from the effects of an equal fractionated dose. Thus 100 mSv is considered twice in the table below – once as received over a 5-year period, and once as an acute dose, received over a short period of time, with differing predicted effects. The table describes doses and their official limits, rather than effects. Comparison of Radiation Doses - includes the amount detected on the trip from Earth to Mars by the RAD on the MSL (2011 - 2013).[16][17][18][19]

Geometry of the Universe Can the Universe be finite in size? If so, what is ``outside'' the Universe? The answer to both these questions involves a discussion of the intrinsic geometry of the Universe. PLoS Biology : Publishing science, accelerating research A Peer-Reviewed, Open Access Journal Current Issue PLOS Biology is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal featuring research articles of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems.

100 Things Personality Test - VisualDNA VisualDNA brings a new layer of information to the world of technology that will help bring it closer to the people who use it – making it more enjoyable and relevant. Technology provides businesses with a surfeit of DATA – what and when. However it provides very little in the way of UNDERSTANDING – who did things, and why they did them. The Absurdity of Infinity: Astrophysicist Janna Levin Explains Whether the Universe Is Infinite or Finite in Letters to Her Mother – Brain Pickings By Maria Popova In 1998, while on the cusp of becoming one of the most significant theoretical cosmologists of our time, mathematician-turned-astrophysicist Janna Levin left her post at Berkeley and moved across the Atlantic for a prestigious position at Cambridge University. During the year and a half there, she had the time and space to contemplate the question that would eventually become the epicenter of her career — whether the universe is infinite or finite. What began as a series of letters to her mother, Sandy, eventually became an unusual diary of Levin’s “social exile as a roaming scientist,” and was finally published as How the Universe Got Its Spots: Diary of a Finite Time in a Finite Space (public library) — a most unusual and absorbing account of the paradoxes of finitude. In an entry from September 3, 1998, Levin fleshes out her ideas on infinity and writes with exquisite Saganesque sensitivity to the poetics of science:

Accelerating Future There isn’t enough in the world. Not enough wealth to go around, not enough space in cities, not enough medicine, not enough intelligence or wisdom. Not enough genuine fun or excitement. Not enough knowledge. Not enough solutions to global problems. What we need is more .

Related: