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The Milky Way Project

The Milky Way Project
What are we looking at in these images? The images shown in the Milky Way Project were taken with a camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, as part of a survey called GLIMPSE, which aimed to map around 85% of the plane of the Milky Way galaxy. Over 440,000 images were taken for this survey. The galactic plane is where most of the young stars, gas and dust are located, and Spitzer is especially sensitive to those. The high resolution of the Spitzer infrared camera makes it possible to see fine detail in these clouds, and the bubbles we see are a great example of that. What part of the night sky are we seeing?

http://www.milkywayproject.org/

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Supernova in Messier 82 discovered by UCL students Updated 23 Jan 2014 - 9:30am Students and staff at UCL’s teaching observatory, the University of London Observatory, have spotted one of the closest supernova to Earth in recent decades. At 19:20 GMT on 21 January, a team of students – Ben Cooke, Tom Wright, Matthew Wilde and Guy Pollack – assisted by Dr Steve Fossey, spotted the exploding star in nearby galaxy Messier 82 (the Cigar Galaxy). The discovery was a fluke – a 10 minute telescope workshop for undergraduate students that led to a global scramble to acquire confirming images and spectra of a supernova in one of the most unusual and interesting of our near-neighbour galaxies. The supernova in M 82 BOINC : calculez pour la science BOINC is a program that lets you donate your idle computer time to science projects like SETI@home, Climateprediction.net, Rosetta@home, World Community Grid, and many others. After installing BOINC on your computer, you can connect it to as many of these projects as you like. You may run this software on a computer only if you own the computer or have the permission of its owner.

The Milky Way The Milky Way virtual tour is a installation free program that will make you feel as if you are there. Just drag the mouse to the direction you want to look. Use the scroll wheel to zoom at the details. Press F9 to get a list of the 3D sites you downloaded (residing in the same directory). To install the listed sites as a screensaver press F5. Our advise is to install all the sites, including The Milky Way, as a screensaver.

Scientists Begin to Unravel Gigantic Space Ribbon This 3-D diagram shows the ribbon (grey) wrapping around our bubble-like heliosphere like a belt. Grey lines show the interstellar magnetic field lines astronomers believe creates this mysterious ribbon. Credit: Adler Planetarium/IBEX Team In 2009 astronomers using NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft accidentally came across a giant ribbon-like formation snaking its way across the boundary between our solar system and interstellar space. Ever since, its true nature has remained a riddle astronomers have been unable to solve. But now, they believe they are a step closer to explaining this bizarre structure.

How to... photo guides : Astronomy Photographer of the Year : Exhibitions : What's on Longing to become an astrophotographer but unsure how it's done and what equipment you need? Already taking pictures of the night sky but looking for some tips and advice? On these pages you’ll find videos from some of the winners of the competition explaining how they got their shot, as well as step-by-step guides from members of our Astronomy Photographer of the Year Flickr group on how to get great results, from getting the right gear through to processing. Download the guides as PDFs: aurora | comets | deep space | the Moon | star trails Milky Way Stars and gases at a wide range of distances from the Galactic center orbit at approximately 220 kilometers per second. The constant rotation speed contradicts the laws of Keplerian dynamics and suggests that much of the mass of the Milky Way does not emit or absorb electromagnetic radiation. This mass has been given the name “dark matter”.[22] The rotational period is about 240 million years at the position of the Sun.[9] The Galaxy as a whole is moving at a velocity of approximately 600 km per second with respect to extragalactic frames of reference. The oldest known star in the Galaxy is at least 13.6 billion years old and thus must have formed shortly after the Big Bang.[6] Surrounded by several smaller satellite galaxies, the Milky Way is part of the Local Group of galaxies, which forms a subcomponent of the Virgo Supercluster. Appearance[edit] The Milky Way has a relatively low surface brightness.

Universality of circular polarization in star- and planet-forming regions: Implications for the origin of homochirality A research team with Jungmi KWON (GUAS/NAOJ) has performed deep imaging linear and circular polarimetry of the 'Cat's Paw Nebula' (NGC 6334) located in the constellation Scorpius, successfully detecting high degrees of circular polarization (CP) of as much as 22% in NGC 6334. The detected CP degree is the highest ever observed. In addition, the team has presented the first systematic survey of a combination of linear and circular polarimetry in nine star- and planet-forming regions.

Hubble telescope takes stunning new nebula photo for 23rd birthday This new Hubble image, captured and released to celebrate the telescopeâ ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI),NASA NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a spectacular new image of an iconic nebula to celebrate its 23 years of peering deep into the heavens. The Hubble observatory, which launched on April 24, 1990, captured the Horsehead Nebula in infrared light, peering through obscuring veils of dust to reveal the object's hidden features. eso0847 - Astronomers Dissect a Supermassive Black Hole with Natural Magnifying Glasses eso0847 — Science Release 12 December 2008 Combining a double natural "magnifying glass" with the power of ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have scrutinised the inner parts of the disc around a supermassive black hole 10 billion light-years away. They were able to study the disc with a level of detail a thousand times better than that of the best telescopes in the world, providing the first observational confirmation of the prevalent theoretical models of such discs. The team of astronomers from Europe and the US studied the "Einstein Cross", a famous cosmic mirage. This cross-shaped configuration consists of four images of a single very distant source.

A Cosmic Map of the Exoplanets [Interactive] Exoplanet hunters have been busy. Since 2011 astronomers have discovered, on average, about three exoplanets every week—a precious few of which lie in the “habitable zone,” where water could take liquid form. This chart maps the known cosmic neighborhood of 861 planets. Click on the options under "Select layout" to map the planets based on their location in the sky, or on their distance from the Sun. (Since the Kepler planet-hunting satellite aims at a single spot in the Northern Hemisphere, a huge group of planets can be found near the 18-hour mark.) Here we've separated the planets into four categories.

Picture of the Week In this new Hubble image, we can see an almost face-on view of the galaxy NGC 1084. At first glance, this galaxy is pretty unoriginal. Like the majority of galaxies that we observe it is a spiral galaxy, and, as with about half of all spirals, it has no bar running through its loosely wound arms. However, although it may seem unremarkable on paper, NGC 1084 is actually a near-perfect example of this type of galaxy — and Hubble has a near-perfect view of it.

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