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The Fabric of the Cosmos

The Fabric of the Cosmos
The Fabric of the Cosmos, a four-hour series based on the book by renowned physicist and author Brian Greene, takes us to the frontiers of physics to see how scientists are piecing together the most complete picture yet of space, time, and the universe. With each step, audiences will discover that just beneath the surface of our everyday experience lies a world we'd hardly recognize - a startling world far stranger and more wondrous than anyone expected. Brian Greene is going to let you in on a secret: We've all been deceived. Our perceptions of time and space have led us astray. Much of what we thought we knew about our universe - that the past has already happened and the future is yet to be, that space is just an empty void, that our universe is the only universe that exists - just might be wrong. Watch the full documentary now (playlist) Related:  Multiverse & Universe Origins

The multiverse in three parts: Brian Greene at TED2012 Photo: James Duncan Davidson Superstring theorist and physicist and the co-founder of the World Science Festival, Brian Greene splits his visually rich, action-packed talk into three distinct sections, all in the name of convincing us of the existence of the multiverse, the possibility that way beyond the earth, the milky way, we’ll find that our universe is part of a vast complex of universes we call the multiverse. Part One: The history and mystery In 1929, the astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that distant galaxies were rushing away from us; that space was stretching and expanding. Fast forward to the 1990s, when two teams of Nobel Prize-winning astronomers aimed to measure the rate at which the expansion of the universe is slowing. Now here’s Greene’s mystery. Part Two: The solution to the mystery Now, Greene gives a quick recap of his own topic of research: string theory, an approach to reaching Einstein’s dream of a unified theory of physics. Of course, questions remain.

10 Ways Our Minds Warp Time How time perception is warped by life-threatening situations, eye movements, tiredness, hypnosis, age, the emotions and more… The mind does funny things to our experience of time. Just ask French cave expert Michel Siffre. In 1962 Siffre went to live in a cave that was completely isolated from mechanical clocks and natural light. He soon began to experience a huge change in his perception of time. When he tried to measure out two minutes by counting up to 120 at one-second intervals, it took him 5 minutes. But you don’t have to hide out in a cave for a couple of months to warp time, it happens to us all the time. 1. People often report that time seems to slow down in life-threatening situations, like skydiving. But are we really processing more information in these seconds when time seems to stretch? To test this, Stetson et al. (2007) had people staring at a special chronometer while free-falling 50 metres into a net. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Time is relative “Time is an illusion.

On Truth & Reality: Philosophy Physics Metaphysics of Space, Wave Structure of Matter. Famous Science Art Quotes. Overview, The Film On the 40th anniversary of the famous ‘Blue Marble’ photograph taken of Earth from space, Planetary Collective presents a short film documenting astronauts’ life-changing stories of seeing the Earth from the outside – a perspective-altering experience often described as the Overview Effect. The Overview Effect, first described by author Frank White in 1987, is an experience that transforms astronauts’ perspective of the planet and mankind’s place upon it. Common features of the experience are a feeling of awe for the planet, a profound understanding of the interconnection of all life, and a renewed sense of responsibility for taking care of the environment. ‘Overview’ is a short film that explores this phenomenon through interviews with five astronauts who have experienced the Overview Effect. The film also features insights from commentators and thinkers on the wider implications and importance of this understanding for society, and our relationship to the environment.

Welcome to the Multiverse Theoretical cosmologist isn’t one of the more hazardous occupations of the modern world. The big risks include jet lag, caffeine overdose, and possibly carpal tunnel syndrome. It wasn’t always so. On February 17, 1600, Giordano Bruno, a mathematician and Dominican friar, was stripped naked and driven through the streets of Rome. Then he was tied to a stake in the Campo de’ Fiori and burned to death. These days, cosmologists like me may be safer, but our ideas have grown only more radical. Also like Bruno, cosmologists are reaching far beyond what observational evidence can tell them. The extent of what astronomers can see is frustratingly limited by the speed of light: one light-year (about six trillion miles) per year. Obviously, we don’t know what the unobservable part of the universe looks like. Here we are not talking about disconnected universes, but rather what we cosmologists call pocket universes. That’s where the multiverse comes from. Next page: Universe gets diverse

5 simple ways to increase self-confidence Self-confidence is one of the key personal qualities necessary for success. Here are 5 ways to develop self-confidence, presented in the book The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz. Use them in life, and you will certainly become successful. 1. Usually in lectures, conferences, briefings and seminars the back rows of the classroom are filled first. 2. There are many bright and talented people (sitting in the same conferences and workshops) who for whatever reason are afraid to express their opinions in order to avoid saying something stupid, not to seem ridiculous, etc. Each time a person wants to say something and says nothing, he injects himself with a portion of the poison that kills confidence. And vice versa: the more you speak, the more confident you become, so after each time you find it more and more easy to speak in public. Make rule to express your opinion in every public meeting you attend. And do not think that you will look silly. 3. How to develop self-confidence?

Welcome to the Possibilium Love 'Cosmos?' Then NASA's 'Images Of A Space-Time Odyssey' Will Make Your Ja... From a psychedelic vortex on Saturn to monster solar flares to the beautiful remnants of dying stars, prepare to get seriously psyched about space. Just check out 30 of the amazing images below. Red Dwarf Star Casey Reed/NASA Artist's depiction of the powerful flare that erupted from the red dwarf star EV Lacertae in 2008. NASA The Hubble Space Telescope revealed this majestic disk of stars and dust lanes in this view of the spiral galaxy NGC 2841. MIT: "New Universes are Being Constantly Created" In this view, “nature gets a lot of tries — the universe is an experiment that’s repeated over and over again, each time with slightly different physical laws, or even vastly different physical laws,” says Jaffe. Some of these universes would collapse instants after forming; in others, the forces between particles would be so weak they could not give rise to atoms or molecules. However, if conditions were suitable, matter would coalesce into galaxies and planets, and if the right elements were present in those worlds, intelligent life could evolve. Some physicists have theorized that only universes in which the laws of physics are “just so” could support life, and that if things were even a little bit different from our world, intelligent life would be impossible. In that case, our physical laws might be explained “anthropically,” meaning that they are as they are because if they were otherwise, no one would be around to notice them. The Daily Galaxy via MIT News Office

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