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How to Stop Worrying

How to Stop Worrying
Undoing the Worrying Habit Once acquired, the habit of worrying seems hard to stop. We're raised to worry and aren't considered "grown up" until we perfect the art. Teenagers are told: "you'd better start worrying about your future". If your worries aren't at least as frequent as your bowel movements, you're seen as irresponsible, childish, aimless. That's a "responsible adult" game rule. To the extent that worrying is learned/conditioned behaviour, it can be undone. Centuries-old cultural conditioning has given us a nasty neurosis: the belief that happiness must be "earned". Laid on top of the first neurosis is the idea that spending money will make you happy. So: we never stop working, we never stop spending money, we're never really happy – ideal conditions, coincidentally, for a certain type of slave economy. You won't stop worrying if you think it serves you. The fight-or-flight response (FOF) is useful on rare occasions of real danger. Worrying is never useful.

http://www.anxietyculture.com/worry.htm

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Government to publish advisory to help improve mental wellbeing in the workplace SINGAPORE: The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) will soon be issuing an advisory to help employers take steps to improve mental wellbeing in the workplace. In his Committee of Supply speech on Tuesday (Mar 3), Minister of State for Manpower Zaqy Mohamad said that the ministry will formulate a Tripartite Advisory on mental wellbeing to educate employers on what can be done. The advisory will highlight initiatives companies should emulate, and that could include access to anonymised external counselling service, or training supervisors to identify mental health symptoms early. MOM aims to finalise the advisory in the second half of this year. The ministry is also piloting iWorkHealth, a web-based psychosocial assessment tool to help employers and their employees identify workplace stressors, while recommending ways to improve mental well-being. The tool is expected to launch later this year.

The Top 10 Psychology Studies of 2010 The end of 2010 fast approaches, and I'm thrilled to have been asked by the editors of Psychology Today to write about the Top 10 psychology studies of the year. I've focused on studies that I personally feel stand out, not only as examples of great science, but even more importantly, as examples of how the science of psychology can improve our lives. Each study has a clear "take home" message, offering the reader an insight or a simple strategy they can use to reach their goals , strengthen their relationships, make better decisions, or become happier. If you extract the wisdom from these ten studies and apply them in your own life, 2011 just might be a very good year. 1) How to Break Bad Habits If you are trying to stop smoking , swearing, or chewing your nails, you have probably tried the strategy of distracting yourself - taking your mind off whatever it is you are trying not to do - to break the habit.

How to Stop Worrying: Self-Help for Anxiety Relief Why is it so hard to stop worrying? Constant worrying takes a heavy toll. It keeps you up at night and makes you tense and edgy during the day. You hate feeling like a nervous wreck. 100 Ways to Nurture Yourself & Demanding Joy - StumbleUpon Probably the most important component to demanding your joy is learning to take excellent care of yourself – mind, body, and spirit. Think of caring for yourself as if you were your own child – giving to yourself at least as much as you give to others. You are worth it! Like joy itself, self-nurturing comes in many little bits. Here are 100 of those bits for your consideration. This is not a checklist – only a list of suggestions.

Color Psychology by David Johnson Like death and taxes, there is no escaping color. It is ubiquitous. Yet what does it all mean? Why are people more relaxed in green rooms? Binaural Beats: Sleep, Therapy, and Meditation When you hear two tones, one in each ear, that are slightly different in frequency, your brain processes a beat at the difference of the frequencies. This is called a binaural beat. Here’s an example: Let’s say you’re listening to a sound in your left ear that’s at a frequency of 132 Hertz (Hz).

10 Simple Postures That Boost Performance Psychological research suggests simple actions can project power, persuade others, increase empathy, boost cognitive performance and more… We tend to think of body language as something that expresses our internal states to the outside world. But it also works the other way around: the position of our body also influences our mind. As the following psychological research shows, how we move can drive both thoughts and feelings and this can boost performance. 1.

Stress - The Body's Response Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of stress. Highlights Nearly everyone experiences stress at some time.

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