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Bluebrain

Bluebrain
News and Announcements The Human Brain Project to present at Swisstech Open Days Representatives of the Human Brain Project (HBP) will be presenting at the grand opening of the Swiss Tech Convention Center, at EPFL in Lausanne on the weekend of 5-6 April 2014. The presentation will consist of a global overview of the project, followed by a projection of the 3D HBP movie and a 10-minute Q&A session. This event will be open to the public. The Human Brain Project Invited to the World Economic Forum

http://bluebrain.epfl.ch/

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The Chinese Room Argument 1. Overview Work in Artificial Intelligence (AI) has produced computer programs that can beat the world chess champion and defeat the best human players on the television quiz show Jeopardy. AI has also produced programs with which one can converse in natural language, including Apple's Siri. Our experience shows that playing chess or Jeopardy, and carrying on a conversation, are activities that require understanding and intelligence.

Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant on Resilience Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg talks about returning to work after her husband’s death, and Wharton management and psychology professor Adam Grant discusses what the research says about resilience. In this joint interview, they talk about how to build resilience in yourself, your team, and your organization. They’re the authors of the new book, Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy. Download this podcast

Elon Musk Says There’s a ‘One in Billions’ Chance Reality Is Not a Simulation Wednesday night, SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk did that thing he does every so often, which is take wild questions from an audience and answer them as if he’s been thinking about them for years, usually because he has. Pick a random quote out of a bag and you can turn Musk’s statements at the Recode Code Conference into a piece of news: He wants to put humans on Mars by 2025, said SpaceX is still on track to test the most powerful rocket in the world this year, said Mars isn’t a “bad choice” for a place to die, wants to relaunch a used Falcon 9 rocket in a few months, said we’re already cyborgs, discussed why a direct democracy would be the best political system for a Mars colony and then went into specifics of how that democracy would work, etc. Depending on the question, the resulting discussions are ones philosophy or engineering students have probably had while they’re flying high on an illicit substance.

Cognitive bias cheat sheet – Better Humans You don’t have to. But you can start by remembering these four giant problems our brains have evolved to deal with over the last few million years (and maybe bookmark this page if you want to occasionally reference it for the exact bias you’re looking for): Information overload sucks, so we aggressively filter. Noise becomes signal.Lack of meaning is confusing, so we fill in the gaps.

Elon Musk: There's only one AI company that worries me Elon Musk's concerns about the dangers of artificial intelligence have been well publicized, but the SpaceX and Tesla founder says that of all the companies currently working on self-aware computers, there's only one whose efforts actually worry him. Speaking on stage at Recode's Code Conference, Musk was asked by The Verge's own Walt Mossberg whether he was worried specifically about the efforts of big tech players like Google and Facebook currently pivoting to AI research. "I won't name names," Musk said, "but there's only one." Mossberg pressed the question, wondering whether the company that kept the Tesla boss up at night was not one currently preoccupied with developing its own car. With a wan smile and a lengthy glance at the floor, Musk repeated his answer, suggesting his eye was on Google.

Gallery Videos Reconstruction and simulation of neocortical microcircuitry The Blue Brain Project Movie Images (High resolution images can be downloaded by clicking on the bold part of the legend) Digital version of piece of rat brain fires like the real thing The brain is going digital. A tiny piece of a rat’s brain has been reconstructed in minute detail in a computer. The digital piece of brain, which includes 31,000 neurons and their 37 million synapses, fires like the real thing, and is already revealing fresh clues as to how the brain works. The simulation is the first significant achievement of the Blue Brain project, which was launched 10 years ago by Henry Markram at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland. Today’s breakthrough represents the first step to a larger goal – creating a digital model of the entire human brain to probe consciousness itself. So far, the digital brain recreates a piece of tissue about one third of a millimetre cubed.

The Tyranny of Stuctureless For everyone to have the opportunity to be involved in a given group and to participate in its activities the structure must be explicit, not implicit. The rules of decision-making must be open and available to everyone, and this can happen only if they are formalized. This is not to say that formalization of a structure of a group will destroy the informal structure. It usually doesn't. But it does hinder the informal structure from having predominant control and make available some means of attacking it if the people involved are not at least responsible to the needs of the group at large. Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates Warn About Artificial Intelligence Hillary Clinton at the Iowa State Fair on August 15, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) The meme that now seems to be dominating much of the media coverage of the Democratic Primary is that pundits and experts are underestimating Bernie Sanders’s chances of winning the Democratic nomination for president. Currently, Mr. Sanders is receiving so much press for being underrated that he has become overrated. The backlash to this meme has already begun as Ross Douthat, for example, on Saturday wrote in The New York Times that “it feels like a good time to double down on that thesis…Hillary’s going to win the nomination, and it isn’t going to be particularly close.”

[ETUDE SCIENCE] Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems.

The AI Revolution: Road to Superintelligence PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. (Or see a preview.) Note: The reason this post took three weeks to finish is that as I dug into research on Artificial Intelligence, I could not believe what I was reading. It hit me pretty quickly that what’s happening in the world of AI is not just an important topic, but by far THE most important topic for our future. So I wanted to learn as much as I could about it, and once I did that, I wanted to make sure I wrote a post that really explained this whole situation and why it matters so much.

Sleep 'resets' brain connections crucial for memory and learning, study reveals For Jules Verne it was the friend who keeps us waiting. For Edgar Allan Poe so many little slices of death. But though the reason we spend a third of our lives asleep has so far resisted scientific explanation, research into the impact of sleepless nights on brain function has shed fresh light on the mystery - and also offered intriguing clues to potential treatments for depression. In a study published on Tuesday, researchers show for the first time that sleep resets the steady build-up of connectivity in the human brain which takes place in our waking hours. The process appears to be crucial for our brains to remember and learn so we can adapt to the world around us. The loss of a single night’s sleep was enough to block the brain’s natural reset mechanism, the scientists found.

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