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Neuroscience

Neuroscience
Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system.[1] Traditionally, neuroscience has been seen as a branch of biology. However, it is currently an interdisciplinary science that collaborates with other fields such as chemistry, computer science, engineering, linguistics, mathematics, medicine and allied disciplines, philosophy, physics, and psychology. It also exerts influence on other fields, such as neuroeducation[2] and neurolaw. The term neurobiology is usually used interchangeably with the term neuroscience, although the former refers specifically to the biology of the nervous system, whereas the latter refers to the entire science of the nervous system. Because of the increasing number of scientists who study the nervous system, several prominent neuroscience organizations have been formed to provide a forum to all neuroscientists and educators. History[edit] The study of the nervous system dates back to ancient Egypt. Modern neuroscience[edit] Human nervous system

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroscience

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Near death experience Characteristics[edit] Researchers have identified the common elements that define near-death experiences.[24] Bruce Greyson argues that the general features of the experience include impressions of being outside one's physical body, visions of deceased relatives and religious figures, and transcendence of egotic and spatiotemporal boundaries.[25] Many different elements have been reported, though the exact elements tend to correspond with the cultural, philosophical, or religious beliefs of the person experiencing it: The traits of a classic NDE are as follows: The notice of unpleasant sound or noise (claimed by R.

Step-by-Step Guide for Setting Up VPN-based Remote Access in a Test Lab This guide provides detailed information about how you can use five computers to create a test lab with which to configure and test virtual private network (VPN) remote access with the Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional operating system with Service Pack 2 (SP2) and the 32-bit versions of the Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 operating system with Service Pack 1 (SP1). These instructions are designed to take you step-by-step through the configuration required for a Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) connection, a Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) with Internet Protocol security (L2TP/IPsec) connection, and a VPN connection that uses certificate-based Extensible Authentication Protocol-Transport Level Security (EAP-TLS) authentication. Setting Up the Test Lab for PPTP, L2TP/IPsec, and EAP-TLS Remote Access VPN Connections

Science General Systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge The Universe represented as multiple disk-shaped slices across time, which passes from left to right Modern science is typically divided into three major branches that consist of the natural sciences (e.g., biology, chemistry, and physics), which study nature in the broadest sense; the social sciences (e.g., economics, psychology, and sociology), which study individuals and societies; and the formal sciences (e.g., logic, mathematics, and theoretical computer science), which study abstract concepts. There is disagreement,[19][20][21] however, on whether the formal sciences actually constitute a science as they do not rely on empirical evidence.[22][20] Disciplines that use existing scientific knowledge for practical purposes, such as engineering and medicine, are described as applied sciences.[23][24][25][26] History Early cultures

Cell (biology) The cell (from Latin cella, meaning "small room"[1]) is the basic structural, functional and biological unit of all known living organisms. Cells are the smallest unit of life that can replicate independently, and are often called the "building blocks of life". The study of cells is called cell biology. The cell was discovered by Robert Hooke in 1665. The cell theory, first developed in 1839 by Matthias Jakob Schleiden and Theodor Schwann, states that all organisms are composed of one or more cells, that all cells come from preexisting cells, that vital functions of an organism occur within cells, and that all cells contain the hereditary information necessary for regulating cell functions and for transmitting information to the next generation of cells.[5] Cells emerged on Earth at least 3.5 billion years ago.[6][7][8] Anatomy

Livestock transportation Sheep in a B Double truck, Moree, NSW, Australia Twelve pigs being transported to an auction sale. Livestock transportation is the movement of livestock, by ship, rail, road or air. Pineal Gland's Third Eye: One Of The Biggest Cover-ups in Human History The pineal gland (also called the pineal body, epiphysis cerebri, epiphysis or the “third eye”) is a small endocrine gland in the vertebrate brain. It produces the serotonin derivative melatonin, a hormone that affects the modulation of wake/sleep patterns and seasonal functions. Its shape resembles a tiny pine cone (hence its name), and it is located near the center of the brain, between the two hemispheres, tucked in a groove where the two rounded thalamic bodies join.

SHA-2 SHA-2 is a set of cryptographic hash functions (SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, SHA-512, SHA-512/224, SHA-512/256) designed by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and published in 2001 by the NIST as a U.S. Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS). SHA stands for Secure Hash Algorithm. SHA-2 includes a significant number of changes from its predecessor, SHA-1. SHA-2 currently consists of a set of six hash functions with digests that are 224, 256, 384 or 512 bits. Physics Various examples of physical phenomena Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, perhaps the oldest through its inclusion of astronomy.[8] Over the last two millennia, physics was a part of natural philosophy along with chemistry, certain branches of mathematics, and biology, but during the Scientific Revolution in the 17th century, the natural sciences emerged as unique research programs in their own right.[b] Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined.

Zoology Zoology (/zoʊˈɒlədʒi/, zoh AHL uh jee) or animal biology, is the branch of biology that relates to the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct. The term is derived from Ancient Greek ζῷον, zōon, i.e. "animal" and λόγος, logos, i.e.

Astronomy Astronomy is a natural science that is the study of celestial objects (such as moons, planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies), the physics, chemistry, and evolution of such objects, and phenomena that originate outside the atmosphere of Earth, including supernovae explosions, gamma ray bursts, and cosmic background radiation. A related but distinct subject, cosmology, is concerned with studying the universe as a whole.[1] Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences. Prehistoric cultures have left astronomical artifacts such as the Egyptian monuments and Nubian monuments, and early civilizations such as the Babylonians, Greeks, Chinese, Indians, Iranians and Maya performed methodical observations of the night sky. However, the invention of the telescope was required before astronomy was able to develop into a modern science. During the 20th century, the field of professional astronomy split into observational and theoretical branches.

10 Questions About the Pineal Gland That Add to the Mystery of Spirituality The pine cone shaped, pea-sized pineal gland, located in the center of the human brain, is an organ of tremendous interest these days. To many spiritual seekers it is the ‘seat of the soul‘ and the ‘third eye,’ the anatomical part of the human body that acts as our spiritual antennae, connecting us to the non-physical, spiritual planes of existence. However, to many scientists and rigid materialist thinkers, it is strictly an endocrine gland responsible for the secretion of the hormone melatonin, a substance which, among other things, aids in the regulation of our circadian rhythms.

Chen Wen Ling Chen Wen Ling (b.1969 in Quanzhou, Fujian Province, China) from Anxi, China is recognized as one of the top ten contemporary sculptors in the international art industry today, exhibiting in a number of prestigious exhibitions such as Art Basel in Switzerland and the Shanghai Biennale. Chen Wen Ling graduated from Xiamen Academy of Art where he studied in the sculpture department and followed by Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. Currently he works and lives in Beijing as a professional artist. Biology History The objects of our research will be the different forms and manifestations of life, the conditions and laws under which these phenomena occur, and the causes through which they have been effected. The science that concerns itself with these objects we will indicate by the name biology [Biologie] or the doctrine of life [Lebenslehre]. Although modern biology is a relatively recent development, sciences related to and included within it have been studied since ancient times. Natural philosophy was studied as early as the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indian subcontinent, and China. However, the origins of modern biology and its approach to the study of nature are most often traced back to ancient Greece.[6] While the formal study of medicine dates back to Hippocrates (ca. 460 BC – ca. 370 BC), it was Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC) who contributed most extensively to the development of biology.

Why this crab's blood could save your life Nearly 50 years ago, scientists discovered the horseshoe crab's clotting-response to bacterial toxins. Now, its blood is harvested in huge quantities, to be used in a test to ensure medical products are not contaminated. Charles River Laboratories manufactures the tests, and is working to raise awareness about the importance of this prehistoric species and the need to protect them. The company helped pass landmark legislation to protect the horseshoe crab in South Carolina, a key spawning ground where it collects crabs. Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), a reagent which is extracted from the horseshoe crab's blue blood, can detect just one picogram of harmful bacterial endotoxin per milliliter -- equivalent to one grain of sand in an Olympic-size pool. More than 600,000 crabs are captured each year to "donate" around 30% of their blood.

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