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40 Superb Psychology Blogs

40 Superb Psychology Blogs
Forty of the best psychology blogs, chosen to give you a broad sweep of the most interesting content being produced online right now. The list is split into three sections: first are more general psychological blogs, followed by those with an academic slant, followed by condition specific and patient perspective blogs. Other than that the blogs are presented in no particular order. Updated Sep 2012 to reflect blogs that are now inactive. General: PsyBlog: The blog you’re reading right now—you should subscribe to PsyBlog here.MindHacks: links to psychological goodness from all around the web. More academic: Dr Petra Boynton: sex educator and academic exposes media misrepresentations of science.Babel’s Dawn: exploring the origins of language.The Neurocritic: anonymous, critical, mischievous.Advances in the History of Psychology: it’s all in the title.Deric Bounds’ MindBlog: biological view of the brain from an Emeritus Professor. Condition specific/patient perspective blogs: Panic!

http://www.spring.org.uk/2009/07/40-superb-psychology-blogs.php

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Need for Constant Stimulation Triggered by Dopamine in the Brain Our need for stimulation and dopamine's action upon the brain are connected, which explains why people who constantly crave stimulation are in danger of addictive behaviour such as drug abuse and gambling. The urge to actively seek out new experiences is a personality trait that psychologists have known about for years, but up until now scientists have been unable to prove how this urge relates to hormonal activities in the brain. Now, an international research team made up of scientists from the University of Copenhagen, University of Aarhus and University of Tokyo have been able to prove for the first time that this hunger for stimulation is greater on average among people who possess more of the gratification hormone - dopamine in the brain.

Upwork Reveals Most In-demand Skills of 2015 - Upwork Blog What skills are businesses turning online to find in 2015? Upwork’s growing community brings nearly 3,000 different skills from talented professionals around the world. Startups, small and midsize businesses, and enterprises alike are realizing they can outsmart the talent crunch and find the specific skills they need, when they need them, by tapping into the vast network of freelancers available online. From development work and quality assurance testing, to graphic design and video production, to translation and content marketing—businesses post three million jobs on our site each year, and freelancers are hired from more than 180 countries through our platform. As you look back on the year and plan ahead for success in 2016, it’s important to understand the skills that have been the most popular on the platform this year.

Which Is Bigger: A Human Brain Or The Universe? : Krulwich Wonders... This is one of those fun-to-think-about questions. A brain isn't much to look at, after all. It's about the size of your two fists put together, three pounds to hold, but oh my, what it can do. Robert Krulwich/NPR With our brains, we can think backwards, imagine forwards, conjure, create things that don't exist, leap vast distances. History of writing The history of writing is primarily the development of expressing language by letters or other marks[1] and also the study and description of these developments. In the history of how systems of representation of language through graphic means have evolved in different human civilizations, more complete writing systems were preceded by proto-writing, systems of ideographic and/or early mnemonic symbols. True writing, in which the content of a linguistic utterance is encoded so that another reader can reconstruct, with a fair degree of accuracy, the exact utterance written down[A 1] is a later development. It is distinguished from proto-writing which typically avoids encoding grammatical words and affixes, making it more difficult or impossible to reconstruct the exact meaning intended by the writer unless a great deal of context is already known in advance. One of the earliest forms of written expression is cuneiform.[2]

The Official Web Site of Oscar Wilde Men "No man is rich enough to buy back his past." "Good resolutions are simply checks that men draw on a bank where they have no account." "Men become old, but they never become good."-- “Lady Windermere's Fan” "I delight in men over seventy, they always offer one the devotion of a lifetime. "-- “A Woman of No Importance” 20 Super Brain Foods « Zen We know that the foods we eat affect the body but they can have even more influence on how well our brain functions. What we eat can have a POWERFUL affect on our brain’s energy, how the mind handles tasks, and our general mood. Our focus here is on those particular nutrients found in foods that enhance neuron firing and cross-linking in the brain. The foods listed below can help you: concentrate, increase memory, tune sensorimotor skills, keep you motivated, speed up your reaction time, control stress, and even slow down the aging of brain cells! So here is a list of 20 different food types that we can add to our diet, their effects, and how they function:

Blogging Resources & Recommendations You want to make money, right? Of course you do. Everyone wants – and needs -to make money. So you started a blog since you’ve heard it’s an easy way to make cash, but you’re not quite sure how to actually make money doing it. Or maybe you already have a blog and you’re exploring ways to monetize it. Using Body Language Techniques > Using Body Language Message clusters | Core patterns | Parts-of-body language | Other notes | See also Body language is an important part of communication which can constitute 50% or more of what we are communicating.

8-Circuit Model of Consciousness The eight-circuit model of consciousness is a theory proposed by Timothy Leary and expanded on by Robert Anton Wilson and Antero Alli. The model describes eight circuits of information (eight "brains") that operate within the human nervous system. Each circuit is concerned with a different sphere of activity. Leary, Alli and Wilson have written about the model in depth and how each circuit operates, both in the lives of individual people and in societies. The term "circuits" came from the first wave of cybernetics research and development in the United States in the 1970s.

An Essay by Einstein "How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people -- first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving... Scientists discover how the brain encodes memories at a cellular level (Santa Barbara, Calif.) –– Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have made a major discovery in how the brain encodes memories. The finding, published in the December 24 issue of the journal Neuron, could eventually lead to the development of new drugs to aid memory. The team of scientists is the first to uncover a central process in encoding memories that occurs at the level of the synapse, where neurons connect with each other. "When we learn new things, when we store memories, there are a number of things that have to happen," said senior author Kenneth S.

Why I Tell My MBA Students to Stop Looking for a Job and Join the Gig Economy When the students in the MBA course I teach on the gig economy ask me for the best thing they can do to prepare for their future careers, I tell them: “Stop looking for a job.” This may sound like odd advice to give MBA students. After all, their degrees are designed to catapult them directly into the upper echelons of corporate America, and most students begin their studies with the goal of getting a job. The problem is, jobs aren’t what they used to be. Why We Can't Live in the Moment By Janice Wood Associate News Editor Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on August 10, 2012 The sought-after ideal of “living in the moment” may be impossible, according to research conducted at the University of Pittsburgh, which pinpoints an area of the brain responsible for using past decisions and outcomes to guide future behavior. The study analyzes signals associated with metacognition, which is a person’s ability to monitor and control cognition — a term described by the researchers as “thinking about thinking.” “The brain has to keep track of decisions and the outcomes they produce,” said Marc Sommer, Ph.D., who did his research for the study as a University of Pittsburgh neuroscience faculty member and is now on the faculty at Duke University. “You need that continuity of thought.

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