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How to Disagree

How to Disagree
March 2008 The web is turning writing into a conversation. Twenty years ago, writers wrote and readers read. The web lets readers respond, and increasingly they do—in comment threads, on forums, and in their own blog posts. Many who respond to something disagree with it. That's to be expected. The result is there's a lot more disagreeing going on, especially measured by the word. If we're all going to be disagreeing more, we should be careful to do it well. DH0. This is the lowest form of disagreement, and probably also the most common. u r a fag!!!!!!!!!! But it's important to realize that more articulate name-calling has just as little weight. The author is a self-important dilettante. is really nothing more than a pretentious version of "u r a fag." DH1. An ad hominem attack is not quite as weak as mere name-calling. Of course he would say that. This wouldn't refute the author's argument, but it may at least be relevant to the case. DH2. DH3. DH4. DH5. DH6. What It Means Related:

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The Mistake You Make in Every Political Argument We’ve all been sufficiently frustrated by the gap between the values someone espouses and the policies they support that we’ve gotten into political arguments to help them see their error. Perhaps, if we’re more honest about our own motivation, we just reacted to get rid of that visceral dissonant feeling that “something that wrong just can’t be allowed to stand.” And, no doubt, whenever you do that, you lay out a clear, fact-based, logically consistent case for the correct view. You’ve probably done it many times—and, if you’re like most people, you’ve changed next-to-no minds at all.

The Top 10 Relationship Words That Aren't Translatable Into English Here are my top ten words, compiled from online collections, to describe love, desire and relationships that have no real English translation, but that capture subtle realities that even we English speakers have felt once or twice. As I came across these words I’d have the occasional epiphany: “Oh yeah! That’s what I was feeling...” Mamihlapinatapei (Yagan, an indigenous language of Tierra del Fuego): The wordless yet meaningful look shared by two people who desire to initiate something, but are both reluctant to start. Oh yes, this is an exquisite word, compressing a thrilling and scary relationship moment.

Martin van Creveld welcomes us to the Age of the Muzzle Summary: The West is changing. Martin van Creveld points to one of its darker trends, as the West appears to be reversing its long journey to greater personal freedom. “It was intended that when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten, a heretical thought — that is, a thought diverging from the principles of Ingsoc — should be literally unthinkable, at least so far as thought is dependent on words. — From 1984 by George Orwell “Welcome to the age of the muzzle.“

Explicit Groups vs Implicit Groups Kevin Cheng (aka @k), product manager at Twitter and an all around smart guy wrote a great blog post called Can We Ever Digitally Organize Our Friends?. I've been thinking many of the same things that Kevin wrote about since I started to use Google+ a few weeks ago and Kevin's post is a good opportunity to riff on the same ideas. But first, a bit of humor courtesy of someecards: With that out of the way, here's my thinking on grouping things. I don't like to be that organized personally.

Industry veteran: LimeWire pirates were iTunes’ best customers Internet pirates are always portrayed as parasitic freeloaders responsible for countless instances of DRM, the "death" of PC gaming, ISP bandwidth caps and more, but according to one industry veteran, that's entirely unfair. During a keynote speech at CA Expo in Sydney, former Google CIO and EMI executive Douglas C. Merrill said that he believes filesharers shouldn't be punished for downloading copyrighted material because it often drives them to make legitimate purchases. While employed by EMI (one of the world's largest music labels and an RIAA member), Merrill supposedly profiled LimeWire users and discovered that they were actually some of the biggest spenders on iTunes. "That's not theft, that's try-before-you-buy marketing and we weren't even paying for it… so it makes sense to sue them," Merrill said sarcastically. In an amusing analogy, he said that suing people for filesharing "is like trying to sell soap by throwing dirt on your customers."

Critical Thinking Model 1 To Analyze Thinking We Must Identify and Question its Elemental Structures Standard: Clarityunderstandable, the meaning can be grasped Could you elaborate further? Fairy Tales Can Come True Here's a "photo story" based on the book, Fairy Tales Can Come True (Just Not Every Day!), published by Shake It! Books. You'll have a few giggles... and learn a few things as well! Falling in love is the easy part. It's staying that way that takes some work.

Andrew Sullivan: We All Live on Campus Now Over the last year, the most common rebuttal to my intermittent coverage of campus culture has been: Why does it matter? These are students, after all. They’ll grow up once they leave their cloistered, neo-Marxist safe spaces. Mapping out a new era in brain research The Human Connectome Project is giving neuroscientists a new perspective on the connections in the brain and how they communicate with each other. Copyright Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, UCLA and Randy Buckner, PhD. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH. www.humanconnectomeproject.org

What You'll Wish You'd Known January 2005 (I wrote this talk for a high school. I never actually gave it, because the school authorities vetoed the plan to invite me.) The Ideological Turing Test: How to Be Less Wrong – The Polymath Project Here’s something that took me half a decade to figure out: It is really, really, really hard to be right. If you want to be right all the time, go be an accountant. The rest of us — paleontologists, internet dating specialists, serial entrepreneurs (read: homeless millenials), policymakers, and scholars of Japanese religions — will just have to get used to being wrong. There’s a strange paradox about wrongness: We go about our lives feeling like we’re right, but — in reality — we spend most of our lives being wrong. Everyone is Wrong… Except for Me One of my favorite introductions to human error is Kathryn Schulz’s Being Wrong.

50 Best Cheap Date Ideas - Handmade Wedding Posted July 20, 2012 | 110 Comments The weekend is right around the corner and we thought it was a great opportunity to share this fun weekend-ready post. For some couples, once they get engaged the ‘dates’ go right out the window, traded in for constant wedding planning. We say… bring on the date nights! Take a (temporary) wedding planning break once in awhile to remember why you’re tying the knot in the first place. Do Britain's Muslims Have a Right Not to be Offended? Religious freedom is one of the core principles of any modern liberal society. As a secularist, I defend the right of religious people to send their children to faith schools, have their children circumcised, or wear the burqa. This does not mean I approve of any of these practices; they should be permissible but not protected from criticism. We should be free to ridicule, lampoon, chastise, critique, etc. every aspect of religious belief that we tolerate.

What 'Brain Food' Actually Does for Your Brain "it's just a chemical dosage that goes from your mouth to your brain" - sorry, but that is completely misleading, and in an article purporting to explain how food interacts with the brain, is downright false. It also ignores information given by the sources you actually quote. Neurotransmitters, with a few exceptions, are composed of protein-like molecules which are digested and absorbed by the gut like any other protein.

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