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The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic]

The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic]
Critical thinking skills truly matter in learning. Why? Because they are life skills we use every day of our lives. Everything from our work to our recreational pursuits, and all that’s in between, employs these unique and valuable abilities. Consciously developing them takes thought-provoking discussion and equally thought-provoking questions to get it going. Begin right here with the Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet. It’s a simple infographic offering questions that work to develop critical thinking on any given topic. How Does It Work? Critical thinking is thinking on purpose. The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet includes categories for Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How. In these questions you’ll find great potential conversation starters and fillers. Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet for Printing You can grab an 11x17 PDF file of the Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet for quick and easy printing. We really hope you enjoy this cheatsheet.

https://globaldigitalcitizen.org/critical-thinking-skills-cheatsheet-infographic

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Happy Birthday, Descartes: 12 “Rules for the Direction of the Mind” from the Founding Father of Western Philosophy By Maria Popova In the late 1620s, about a decade before he coined Cogito ergo sum (“I think, therefore I am”) — the slogan that would establish him as the founding father of modern Western philosophy — the great French philosopher, scientist, and mathematician René Descartes (March 31, 1596–February 11, 1650) set about delineating the rules of critical thinking. His list, titled Rules for the Direction of the Mind and partway in time between the Buddha’s Charter of Free Inquiry and Carl Sagan’s Baloney Detection Kit, endures as a timeless tuning mechanism for the inner workings of reason. Of the 36 rules Descartes planned to write, he only penned 21, the first twelve of which outlined the principles of the scientific method. (The latter nine were specific to mathematics and thus rather esoteric.) His twelve-vertebrae backbone of critical thinking reads as follows:

The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons The Edublogs support team regularly receives complaints and official requests to remove copyrighted content that users have placed on blogs. The legal jargon with respect to digital copyrights can be confusing – especially since different countries have their own laws and regulations. Understanding digital copyright is an essential skill we need to understand and teach our students.

Focusing on Big Ideas and Key Issues, LearnAlberta [Download Printable Version] Beginning with the Program Rationale and Philosophy on page one of the program of studies, the first ten pages of the document provide an overview of the foundations of the program. All of the grade/course levels are based on the program foundations. The core concepts of citizenship and identity are foundations for the Social Studies Kindergarten to Grade 12 program of studies. Fake News: Not Your Main Problem This headline may sound shocking, but I truly understand the urgent need to develop digital literacies in response to the fake news phenomenon. But, let me tell you, I live in Egypt, where “fake” news has been the norm for years. Orwell’s got nothing on us. A couple weeks ago, I tweeted this (and this post expands on that): I agree with Kris Shaffer, Mike Caulfield, Lee Skallerup Bessette and others on the importance of promoting digital literacies so college students and all of us can detect fake news and combat it.

9 of the Best Australian Contemporary Young Adult novels – Better Reading YA author Steph Bowe chooses the cream of the crop in recent Australian YA releases that can be read by teenagers and adults alike! Steph Bowe was born in Melbourne in 1994 and now lives in Queensland. She has written two earlier YA novels: Girl Saves Boy and All This Could End, and her newest, Night Swimming, is due to be released on April 3.

Good Questions for Inquiry Based Projects March 2013 • Sue Jackson Once you have a classroom environment which promotes curiosity, fascination, and mindfulness, students begin to raise questions and seek answers through the inquiry process. Because the framing of a good question is the driving force in any inquiry, let's explore: What makes a good question for inquiry-based projects? Any question that matters to students is a good question. If students are genuinely interested in the answer and learning about the topic, then the question is worthy of investigation. The Questioning Toolkit - Revised The first version of the Questioning Toolkit was published in November of 1997. Since then there has been substantial revision of its major question types and how they may function as an interwoven system. This article takes the model quite a few steps further, explaining more about each type of question and how it might support the overall investigative process in combination with the other types.

10 Benefits Of Inquiry-Based Learning 10 Benefits Of Inquiry-Based Learning by TeachThought Staff Inquiry-based learning is a term that educators and parents alike hear bandied about without a clear sense of exactly what it is, why it’s effective, how it works, and what its benefits are. For now, let’s define inquiry-based learning simply as an open-ended approach to learning guided by students through questions, research, and/or curiosity. Sketch-noter Sylvia Duckworth took Trevor MacKenzie’s ideas on the benefits on inquiry-based learning and put together the image above.

Essential Questions Model Essential Questions Social Problems/Health • Who is hungry and what are the effects of hunger? Oxford's Free Course Critical Reasoning For Beginners Will Teach You to Think Like a Philosopher When I was younger, I often found myself disagreeing with something I’d read or heard, but couldn’t explain exactly why. Despite being unable to pinpoint the precise reasons, I had a strong sense that the rules of logic were being violated. After I was exposed to critical thinking in high school and university, I learned to recognize problematic arguments, whether they be a straw man, an appeal to authority, or an ad hominem attack. Faulty arguments are all-pervasive, and the mental biases that underlie them pop up in media coverage, college classes, and armchair theorizing.

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