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Thinking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow
Thinking, Fast and Slow is a best-selling[1] 2011 book by Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics winner Daniel Kahneman which summarizes research that he conducted over decades, often in collaboration with Amos Tversky.[2][3] It covers all three phases of his career: his early days working on cognitive biases, his work on prospect theory, and his later work on happiness. The book's central thesis is a dichotomy between two modes of thought: "System 1" is fast, instinctive and emotional; "System 2" is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. The book delineates cognitive biases associated with each type of thinking, starting with Kahneman's own research on loss aversion. From framing choices to substitution, the book highlights several decades of academic research to suggest that people place too much confidence in human judgment. Prospect theory[edit] One example is that people are loss-averse: they are more likely to act to avert a loss than to achieve a gain. Two systems[edit] Related:  Critical Thinkingodysseus2016

Made to Stick Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die is a book by brothers Chip and Dan Heath published by Random House on January 2, 2007.[1] The book continues the idea of "stickiness" popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in The Tipping Point, seeking to explain what makes an idea or concept memorable or interesting. A similar style to Gladwell's is used, with a number of stories and case studies followed by principles. The stories range from urban legends, such as the "Kidney Heist" in the introduction; to business stories, as with the story of Southwest Airlines, "the low price airline"; to inspirational, personal stories such as that of Floyd Lee, a passionate mess hall manager. Each chapter includes a section entitled "Clinic", in which the principles of the chapter are applied to a specific case study or idea to demonstrate the principle's application. Overview[edit] The book's outline follows the acronym "SUCCES" (with the last s omitted). Authors[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Mindset | What is Mindset Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains: Why brains and talent don’t bring success How they can stand in the way of it Why praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes them How teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivity What all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference. In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. Teaching a growth mindset creates motivation and productivity in the worlds of business, education, and sports.

The Code of Gamification Ethics For the last two years, I’ve been quietly talking about a gamification code of ethics. The discussion tends to come up most often at dinner parties and during GSummit, but it’s also been a hot topic during debates about gamification’s role in the future. I firmly believe that part of the reason we get so much snark online for Gamification is not because it’s a passing fad, but rather because it’s a powerful force for change that threatens the existing order. While we could dodge the question of gamification’s potential to cause harm to society, I don’t think we should. That’s why I want to start a dialogue with the whole community about a code of ethics for our industry — and we need your involvement. Why Do This? How Do We Do This The newly created Engagement Alliance has three core objectives: Education, Advocacy and Research. Here’s the working statement: Join us at GSummit 2014 in San Francisco this June 10-13 to learn how your company can "Recapture User Engagement."

Heidegger: Thinking the Unthinkable | Watch Free Documentary Onl German philosopher Martin Heidegger addressed the central question of human existence full on, by examining how human self-awareness depends on concepts of time and death. His preoccupation with ontology - the form of metaphysical inquiry concerned with the study of existence itself - dominated his work. The central idea of his complex Sein und Zeit (Being and Time) (1927) could be summed up in the phrase 'being is'. Man had to ask himself 'what is it to be?' and only by doing this, and standing back from absorption into objects and other distractions, could he actually exist. Heidegger also felt that art, like language, was important evidence of existence, something which was a real existence rather than a mere recreation of reality. Despite this, his work has been widely influential, especially on the thought of twentieth century philosophical giants such as Sartre, Lacan and Derrida. Watch the full documentary now -

Save The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus Help Save The ENDANGERED From EXTINCTION! The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus Rare photo of the elusive tree octopus The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. An intelligent and inquisitive being (it has the largest brain-to-body ratio for any mollusk), the tree octopus explores its arboreal world by both touch and sight. Reaching out with one of her eight arms, each covered in sensitive suckers, a tree octopus might grab a branch to pull herself along in a form of locomotion called tentaculation; or she might be preparing to strike at an insect or small vertebrate, such as a frog or rodent, or steal an egg from a bird's nest; or she might even be examining some object that caught her fancy, instinctively desiring to manipulate it with her dexterous limbs (really deserving the title "sensory organs" more than mere "limbs",) in order to better know it. Why It's Endangered

Mindset (book) Carol S. Dweck (born October 17, 1946) is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.[1] She graduated from Barnard College in 1967 and earned a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1972. She taught at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the University of Illinois before joining the Stanford faculty in 2004. Contributions[edit] Professor Dweck has primary research interests in motivation,[2][3][4][5][6][7] personality, and development. "In a fixed mindset students believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits. This is important because (1) individuals with a "growth" theory are more likely to continue working hard despite setbacks and (2) individuals' theories of intelligence can be affected by subtle environmental cues. Selected publications[edit] Dweck, C. Sources[edit] See also[edit] Goal orientation References[edit]

Kill it With Fire: why Gamification sucks and Game Dynamics rule This is a transcript (sort of)of an Ignite session I just delivered at the Melcrum Digital Communications Summit in London. I don’t like Gamification. It’s been a buzzword for years and too many people seem to be missing the point. Corporate suited types see the engagement people show video games and think “Oh, I’ll have some of that!” (disclosure: I am currently a corporate suited type). This leads people to do silly things such as add badges and a points system to their boring web site. All the cherry flavour in the world isn’t enough to mask that medicine. People are smart. Instead, we need to focus on creating intrinsically rewarding experiences. So what makes games intrinsically rewarding? Want to make people run? These dynamics are all based on basic principles. Life is ambiguous. Which brings us to the second main principle. People love dogs for a lot of reasons, but one of them is emotional transparency. Are you doing well? Allows them to expand at their own pace. Like this:

The Century of the Self This series is about how those in power have used Freud's theories to try and control the dangerous crowd in an age of mass democracy. Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, changed the perception of the human mind and its workings profoundly. His influence on the 20th century is widely regarded as massive. The documentary describes the impact of Freud's theories on the perception of the human mind, and the ways public relations agencies and politicians have used this during the last 100 years for their engineering of consent. Among the main characters are Freud himself and his nephew Edward Bernays, who was the first to use psychological techniques in advertising. He is often seen as the father of the public relations industry. Freud's daughter Anna Freud, a pioneer of child psychology, is mentioned in the second part, as well as Wilhelm Reich, one of the main opponents of Freud's theories. Happiness Machines. The Engineering of Consent. Eight People Sipping Wine In Kettering.

DAVID FOSTER WALLACE, IN HIS OWN WORDS IN MEMORIAM | September 19th 2008 The world of letters has lost a giant. We have felt nourished by the mournful graspings of sites dedicated to his memory ("He was my favourite" ~ Zadie Smith), and we grieve for the books we will never see. Special to MORE INTELLIGENT LIFE This is the commencement address he gave to the graduates of Kenyon College in 2005. (If anybody feels like perspiring [cough], I'd advise you to go ahead, because I'm sure going to. This is a standard requirement of US commencement speeches, the deployment of didactic little parable-ish stories. Of course the main requirement of speeches like this is that I'm supposed to talk about your liberal arts education's meaning, to try to explain why the degree you are about to receive has actual human value instead of just a material payoff. Here's another didactic little story. The point here is that I think this is one part of what teaching me how to think is really supposed to mean. Everyone here has done this, of course.

Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman – review A human being "is a dark and veiled thing; and whereas the hare has seven skins, the human being can shed seven times seventy skins and still not be able to say: This is really you, this is no longer outer shell." So said Nietzsche, and Freud agreed: we are ignorant of ourselves. The idea surged in the 20th century and became a commonplace, a "whole climate of opinion", in Auden's phrase. It's still a commonplace, but it's changing shape. These days, the bulk of the explanation is done by something else: the "dual-process" model of the brain. System 2 is slow, deliberate, effortful. System 2 is slothful, and tires easily (a process called "ego depletion") – so it usually accepts what System 1 tells it. The general point about the size of our self-ignorance extends beyond the details of Systems 1 and 2. Since then, thousands of other experiments have been conducted, right across the broad board of human life, all to the same general effect.

eLearning: How to Incorporate Gamification Elements by AJ George If you happened to catch my earlier article on the gamification of learning, then you know that I have been dubious about its effectiveness. To be clear, it's not the premise of having fun in learning that I feel we should be wary of. Stories, Yes. We've all heard that it is no longer cool to give a presentation of nothing but bullet points. At a minimum, create a work-like scenario. An even more compelling story will have actual characters and a string of events. It's the bottom of the 8th in the high-school baseball game. Elaborate as much or as little as you need to create interest and get the point across. Challenge Learners and Promote Creativity That same story-telling approach can be used to spiff up quizzes. You are in the midst of a zombie apocalypse. Provide Continual On-The-Spot Feedback One of the best things about games, particularly of the video variety, is that you don't have to wait to find out how you did.

Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil A brilliant young man, he was appointed professor at the University of Basel aged 24 having not even finished his degree. His evanescent philosophical life ended 20 years later when he went insane and died shortly afterwards. Nietzsche's argued that the Christian system of faith and worship was not only incorrect, but harmful to society because it allowed the weak to rule the strong - it suppressed the will to power which was the driving force of human character. Nietzsche wanted people to throw of the shackles of our misguided Christian morality and become supermen - free and titanic. However, without God he felt that the future of man might spiral into a society of nihilism, devoid of any meaning; his aim was for man to realise the lack of divine purpose and create his own values. The core of Nietzsche's work, including Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-92), Beyond Good and Evil (1886), The Birth of Tragedy (1872) was to find a meaning and morality in the absence of God.

Conjunction fallacy I am particularly fond of this example [the Linda problem] because I know that the [conjoint] statement is least probable, yet a little homunculus in my head continues to jump up and down, shouting at me—“but she can’t just be a bank teller; read the description.” The conjunction fallacy is a formal fallacy that occurs when it is assumed that specific conditions are more probable than a single general one. The most often-cited example of this fallacy originated with Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman:[2][3] Linda is 31 years old, single, outspoken, and very bright. The majority of those asked chose option 2. , and For example, even choosing a very low probability of Linda being a bank teller, say Pr(Linda is a bank teller) = 0.05 and a high probability that she would be a feminist, say Pr(Linda is a feminist) = 0.95, then, assuming independence, Pr(Linda is a bank teller and Linda is a feminist) = 0.05 × 0.95 or 0.0475, lower than Pr(Linda is a bank teller). Other demonstrations[edit]

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