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Questioning Strategies

Questioning Strategies
Related:  Asking Questionsjulestef

Effective Questioning Strategies Questioning Techniques Questioning is one of the most important dimensions of teaching and learning. It gives tutors the chance to find out what students know and understand, and it allows students to seek clarification and help. There are many types of questions. Another way of understanding question types is in terms of lower vs. higher order questions. Some tutors plan key questions ahead of time. Source: Example Questions Open-ended Comprehension Questions Amplify: “Tell me more about that.” Source: Meyer, E., & Smith L.Z. (1987). Closed-ended Memory Level Questions “What is the acceleration due to gravity?” Source: Gattis, K. (2002).

Questioning Strategies | Center for Teaching and Learning Questions should play an important role in every classroom--both student questions and teacher questions. Teachers can create an active learning environment by encouraging students to ask and answer questions. Teacher Questions PLAN SOME QUESTIONS AS YOU PREPARE your lesson plan. Consider your instructional goals and emphasize questions that reinforce them. ASK CLEAR, SPECIFIC QUESTIONS that require more than a yes or no answer. If a student does give you a yes/no or short answer, ask a follow up question that will encourage him/her to expand, clarify, or justify the answer. USE VOCABULARY THAT STUDENTS CAN UNDERSTAND. ASK QUESTIONS IN AN EVENLY-PACED, EASILY IDENTIFIABLE ORDER. ASK QUESTIONS FROM ALL LEVELS of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. USE QUESTIONS TO HELP STUDENTS CONNECT IMPORTANT CONCEPTS. USE QUESTIONS TO GIVE YOU FEEDBACK on whether students have understood the material. ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR STUDENTS TO ANSWER your questions (10-15 seconds). b.

8 Practical Strategies to Ge to Know Your Students August 23, 2014 As a teacher, the first week of the new school year is always an exciting time for me as I get to deal with new classes and new students.There is always that deep-seated drive to know your students and learn about their learning styles, their previous academic background and what they expect from your class. Each teacher has her/his own strategy to get to know their students but now with the widespread of technology, a number of digital activities can be used to enable students to express themselves freely and articulate what they want others to know about them. Creating autobiographical trailers, audio clips, blog postings..etc are some examples of how students can use technology to introduce themselves to their peers and to their learning community. There are also a set of other interesting strategies that are not necessarily technology based and which teachers can use to get to know their students. The handy visual below features some of them . 2-Ready, set, group!

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. They help to define what it means to be human. Most important thought during our lives will center on such essential questions. What does it mean to be a good friend? If we were to draw a cluster diagram of the Questioning Toolkit, Essential Questions would be at the center of all the other types of questions. All the other questions and questioning skills serve the purpose of "casting light upon" or illuminating Essential Questions. Most Essential Questions are interdisciplinary in nature. Essential Questions probe the deepest issues confronting us . . . complex and baffling matters which elude simple answers: Life - Death - Marriage - Identity - Purpose - Betrayal - Honor - Integrity - Courage - Temptation - Faith - Leadership - Addiction - Invention - Inspiration. Essential Questions are at the heart of the search for Truth. Essential Questions offer the organizing focus for a unit.

Questioning Techniques: Research-Based Strategies for Teachers — Energy and the Polar Environment Questioning techniques are a heavily used, and thus widely researched, teaching strategy. Research indicates that asking questions is second only to lecturing. Teachers typically spend anywhere from 35 to 50 percent of their instructional time asking questions. But are these questions effective in raising student achievement? How can teachers ask better questions of their students? Teachers ask questions for a variety of purposes, including: To actively involve students in the lessonTo increase motivation or interestTo evaluate students’ preparationTo check on completion of workTo develop critical thinking skillsTo review previous lessonsTo nurture insightsTo assess achievement or mastery of goals and objectivesTo stimulate independent learning A teacher may vary his or her purpose in asking questions during a single lesson, or a single question may have more than one purpose. Some researchers have simplified classification of questions into lower and higher cognitive questions.

How to Give a Memorable Speech (Chip Heath and Dan Heath) What makes a speech a great speech, one people remember, especially your teacher? The key is in your message, not your presentation. Use the six sticky principles taught by Chip Heath and Dan Heath in their book Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, and give a speech you'll get an A on. Unless you live in a cave, you know the story of Jared, the college student who lost hundreds of pounds eating Subway sandwiches. It's a story that almost wasn't told for the same reasons that many of our papers and speeches are boring. We get so filled up with statistics and abstractions and all the things we know, that we forget to share the simple message at the core of what we're trying to communicate. Subway executives wanted to talk about fat grams and calories. The ideas the Heath brothers teach are ideas that will make your next paper or speech memorable, whether your audience is your teacher or the entire student body. Here are their six principles: About the authors:

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning. However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. Tell: Tell children the story by reading the text or having them read the text. Suggest: This involves providing children with choices about what might happen next or possible opinions they might have. For the story, here are some two-question rule sequences:

A Primer In Effective Questioning Strategies For Classroom & eLearning - by Rosa Fattahi, WizIQ The Importance of Questioning in the Learning Process Since the ancient days of philosopher Socrates, asking questions has been a critical part of the teaching and learning process. The well-known question-and-answer technique that Socrates employed with his pupils demonstrated how well dialogue and discourse work to stimulate students, encourage more complex thinking, and help them learn. Questions are invaluable teaching tools that serve many functions in the teaching and learning processes. Assess knowledge and learningPrompt students to clarify, expand, and support their claimsDirect students to engage in discussion or debateEncourage students to question their own thought process or reasoningApply class concepts to real-world scenarios Verbal questioning is one of the most common pedagogical tools, second only to perhaps lecturing. Effective Questioning Addresses a Range of Cognitive Skills Bloom’s Taxonomy Lower vs. Rosa Fattahi is a developer with WizIQ

Students Join now to get your very own Boomer. Get writing on BoomWriter today and you could be a published author! Join Now Educators & Schools BoomWriter is free for educators to use with their students. Join Now 41 Change Questions Change is the only constant in the world, there’s no doubt about it. Today more than ever, businesses must face – and effectively manage – rising change and complexity. Uncertainty is everywhere we look. From marketplace shifts to surprise disruptions, managing this new reality is not an easy task. If you think about our organizations today, they are all part of a dynamic business network of relationships with customers, partners and suppliers that shape the way we do business. Bottom line is that the time is up for sitting on the sidelines. As you consider the processes that make your business run, here are 41 key questions you should ask yourself: Does your organization change effectively when it needs to? Tags: ceo business-agility business-leader featured change questions cio agile cto complexity it-leader

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. So that day, I learned about wait/think time. Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions, and not only asking well-designed ones, but ones that will also lead students to questions of their own. Keeping It Simple I also learned over the years that asking straightforward, simply-worded questions can be just as effective as those intricate ones. #1. This question interrupts us from telling too much. #2. After students share what they think, this follow-up question pushes them to provide reasoning for their thinking. #3. #4. This question can inspire students to extend their thinking and share further evidence for their ideas. #5.

High school stops fighting, learns to love students and tech At the public New Tech High School in California, students bring their own laptops and are encouraged to use Twitter in class. The New Tech High School in Napa allows students to bring in their own computersInstead of limiting access to social media, school teaches about digital responsibility Custom program using Google Apps puts assignments, grades in the cloud Napa, California (CNN) -- Many high-school-age students are hooked on their phones and computers. Instead of fighting the kids, some schools like the public New Technology High School in Napa, California, are jumping right in and embracing the technology. "We meet kids where they live," New Tech Principal Michelle Spencer said. Where they live is increasingly online, on instant messenger and Twitter. New Tech High School, founded in 1997, is the oldest member of the New Tech Network, a national nonprofit organization that schools hire to implement project-based learning and embed the use of technology with teachers and students.

Asking Questions to Improve Learning | The Teaching Center | Washington University in St. Louis When you prepare for class, office hours, and help sessions, compose specific questions that you will ask your students (or that you anticipate they will ask you). Doing so will help you increase student participation and encourage active learning. The strategies below will also help you formulate questions for exams and paper assignments. Active learning extends beyond the classroom. When you ask questions in the classroom, you are modeling a process that students can and should use themselves; encourage your students to use the following questioning strategies to assess what they have learned, to develop their thinking skills, and to study for exams. General Strategies for Asking Questions When planning questions, keep in mind your course goals. Responding Effectively Wait for students to think and formulate responses. Why Ask “Open” Questions? 1. What is the most important idea that was generated in today’s discussion? 2. Could you elaborate on that point? 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer Thinkstock In a traditional classroom, the teacher is the center of attention, the owner of knowledge and information. Teachers often ask questions of their students to gauge comprehension, but it’s a passive model that relies on students to absorb information they need to reproduce on tests. What would happen if the roles were flipped and students asked the questions? That’s the premise of the Right Question Institute and a new book by its co-directors Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana. The book, Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions, documents a step-by-step process to help students formulate and prioritize questions about nearly everything. Coming up with the right question involves vigorously thinking through the problem, investigating it from various angles, turning closed questions into open-ended ones and prioritizing which are the most important questions to get at the heart of the matter. “We’ve been underestimating how well our kids can think.”

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