background preloader

Questioning Strategies

Questioning Strategies
Related:  Asking Questionsjulestef

Effective Questioning Strategies Questioning Techniques Questioning is one of the most important dimensions of teaching and learning. It gives tutors the chance to find out what students know and understand, and it allows students to seek clarification and help. There are many types of questions. Another way of understanding question types is in terms of lower vs. higher order questions. Some tutors plan key questions ahead of time. Source: Example Questions Open-ended Comprehension Questions Amplify: “Tell me more about that.” Source: Meyer, E., & Smith L.Z. (1987). Closed-ended Memory Level Questions “What is the acceleration due to gravity?” Source: Gattis, K. (2002).

8 Practical Strategies to Ge to Know Your Students August 23, 2014 As a teacher, the first week of the new school year is always an exciting time for me as I get to deal with new classes and new students.There is always that deep-seated drive to know your students and learn about their learning styles, their previous academic background and what they expect from your class. Each teacher has her/his own strategy to get to know their students but now with the widespread of technology, a number of digital activities can be used to enable students to express themselves freely and articulate what they want others to know about them. Creating autobiographical trailers, audio clips, blog postings..etc are some examples of how students can use technology to introduce themselves to their peers and to their learning community. There are also a set of other interesting strategies that are not necessarily technology based and which teachers can use to get to know their students. The handy visual below features some of them . 2-Ready, set, group!

Questioning Strategies | Center for Teaching and Learning Questions should play an important role in every classroom--both student questions and teacher questions. Teachers can create an active learning environment by encouraging students to ask and answer questions. Teacher Questions PLAN SOME QUESTIONS AS YOU PREPARE your lesson plan. Consider your instructional goals and emphasize questions that reinforce them. ASK CLEAR, SPECIFIC QUESTIONS that require more than a yes or no answer. If a student does give you a yes/no or short answer, ask a follow up question that will encourage him/her to expand, clarify, or justify the answer. USE VOCABULARY THAT STUDENTS CAN UNDERSTAND. ASK QUESTIONS IN AN EVENLY-PACED, EASILY IDENTIFIABLE ORDER. ASK QUESTIONS FROM ALL LEVELS of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. USE QUESTIONS TO HELP STUDENTS CONNECT IMPORTANT CONCEPTS. USE QUESTIONS TO GIVE YOU FEEDBACK on whether students have understood the material. ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR STUDENTS TO ANSWER your questions (10-15 seconds). b.

How to Give a Memorable Speech (Chip Heath and Dan Heath) What makes a speech a great speech, one people remember, especially your teacher? The key is in your message, not your presentation. Use the six sticky principles taught by Chip Heath and Dan Heath in their book Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, and give a speech you'll get an A on. Unless you live in a cave, you know the story of Jared, the college student who lost hundreds of pounds eating Subway sandwiches. It's a story that almost wasn't told for the same reasons that many of our papers and speeches are boring. We get so filled up with statistics and abstractions and all the things we know, that we forget to share the simple message at the core of what we're trying to communicate. Subway executives wanted to talk about fat grams and calories. The ideas the Heath brothers teach are ideas that will make your next paper or speech memorable, whether your audience is your teacher or the entire student body. Here are their six principles: About the authors:

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. They help to define what it means to be human. Most important thought during our lives will center on such essential questions. What does it mean to be a good friend? If we were to draw a cluster diagram of the Questioning Toolkit, Essential Questions would be at the center of all the other types of questions. All the other questions and questioning skills serve the purpose of "casting light upon" or illuminating Essential Questions. Most Essential Questions are interdisciplinary in nature. Essential Questions probe the deepest issues confronting us . . . complex and baffling matters which elude simple answers: Life - Death - Marriage - Identity - Purpose - Betrayal - Honor - Integrity - Courage - Temptation - Faith - Leadership - Addiction - Invention - Inspiration. Essential Questions are at the heart of the search for Truth. Essential Questions offer the organizing focus for a unit.

Students Join now to get your very own Boomer. Get writing on BoomWriter today and you could be a published author! Join Now Educators & Schools BoomWriter is free for educators to use with their students. Join Now The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning. However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. Tell: Tell children the story by reading the text or having them read the text. Suggest: This involves providing children with choices about what might happen next or possible opinions they might have. For the story, here are some two-question rule sequences:

High school stops fighting, learns to love students and tech At the public New Tech High School in California, students bring their own laptops and are encouraged to use Twitter in class. The New Tech High School in Napa allows students to bring in their own computersInstead of limiting access to social media, school teaches about digital responsibility Custom program using Google Apps puts assignments, grades in the cloud Napa, California (CNN) -- Many high-school-age students are hooked on their phones and computers. Instead of fighting the kids, some schools like the public New Technology High School in Napa, California, are jumping right in and embracing the technology. "We meet kids where they live," New Tech Principal Michelle Spencer said. Where they live is increasingly online, on instant messenger and Twitter. New Tech High School, founded in 1997, is the oldest member of the New Tech Network, a national nonprofit organization that schools hire to implement project-based learning and embed the use of technology with teachers and students.

41 Change Questions Change is the only constant in the world, there’s no doubt about it. Today more than ever, businesses must face – and effectively manage – rising change and complexity. Uncertainty is everywhere we look. From marketplace shifts to surprise disruptions, managing this new reality is not an easy task. If you think about our organizations today, they are all part of a dynamic business network of relationships with customers, partners and suppliers that shape the way we do business. Bottom line is that the time is up for sitting on the sidelines. As you consider the processes that make your business run, here are 41 key questions you should ask yourself: Does your organization change effectively when it needs to? Tags: ceo business-agility business-leader featured change questions cio agile cto complexity it-leader

The Triumph of the Tablet - Peter Osnos The summer of 2013 has been, in many ways, the summer of the iPad. Over the years, our annual family foray to Lake Michigan has become, aside from the usual vacation pleasures, a measure of how technology has changed our habits when it comes to information and entertainment. We've come a very long way from the farm edition of the Chicago Tribune and a small black and white television with antenna ears. This year, in addition to bringing laptops (mainly for the steady stream of office and personal e-mails that are now, irreversibly, an accepted 24/7 routine), smartphones, iPods, a stack of books, and our New York Times subscription delivered at dawn, we added an iPad (mine) and an iPad Mini (my wife's). So much for the prevalence of movies, television, and DVDs that were only a few years ago the leading aspects of after-dinner activity, aside from the continuing mainstays of beach fires (and amateur fireworks), cookouts, and a round of evenings with relatives and neighbors.

Asking Questions to Improve Learning | The Teaching Center | Washington University in St. Louis When you prepare for class, office hours, and help sessions, compose specific questions that you will ask your students (or that you anticipate they will ask you). Doing so will help you increase student participation and encourage active learning. The strategies below will also help you formulate questions for exams and paper assignments. Active learning extends beyond the classroom. When you ask questions in the classroom, you are modeling a process that students can and should use themselves; encourage your students to use the following questioning strategies to assess what they have learned, to develop their thinking skills, and to study for exams. General Strategies for Asking Questions When planning questions, keep in mind your course goals. Responding Effectively Wait for students to think and formulate responses. Why Ask “Open” Questions? 1. What is the most important idea that was generated in today’s discussion? 2. Could you elaborate on that point? 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

70+ iPad Apps Written in French for Students Sylvia Duckworth is a French teacher who has started a new blog about iPad and iPhone apps that are available in French. Slyvia reviewing apps and making suggestions for apps that students can use in French. Some of the apps are for learning French while others are for completing activities completely in French. Tags: free apps, free ipad app, free ipad apps, French Apps, language arts, world languages Influential Leaders Ask These 6 Questions The key to being a powerful leader isn't giving orders -- it's extending your influence. And one important way to do that is by spreading and soliciting new ideas. As an influential leader, you are a conduit of ideas. Zig-Zag Into Interactions Many great ideas originate (or are developed) organically, often through informal interactions rather than formal meetings -- the adult version of midnight discussions in the hallway of your college dorm. What do you think about this idea I have? Rather than schedule these interactions, which can feel too formal and potentially stifling, you should budget five or ten extra minutes to zig-zag your way to meetings, lunch or even the restroom. While some of your interactions might be in-depth, most of them should simply about connecting with people for no immediate business reason. Start small: Try zig-zagging into these conversations once a week for a month ... and watch your leadership influence grow.

Education - iPad - Teacher Stories

Related: