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Effective Questioning Strategies

Effective Questioning Strategies
Questioning Techniques Questioning is one of the most important dimensions of teaching and learning. It gives tutors the chance to find out what students know and understand, and it allows students to seek clarification and help. There are many types of questions. One dichotomy is the closed vs. open question types. Another way of understanding question types is in terms of lower vs. higher order questions. Some tutors plan key questions ahead of time. Source: Example Questions Open-ended Comprehension Questions Amplify: “Tell me more about that.” Source: Meyer, E., & Smith L.Z. (1987). Closed-ended Memory Level Questions “What is the acceleration due to gravity?” Source: Gattis, K. (2002). Related:  Asking Questionskatecaragher

Questioning Strategies | Center for Teaching and Learning Questions should play an important role in every classroom--both student questions and teacher questions. Teachers can create an active learning environment by encouraging students to ask and answer questions. Teacher Questions PLAN SOME QUESTIONS AS YOU PREPARE your lesson plan. Consider your instructional goals and emphasize questions that reinforce them. ASK CLEAR, SPECIFIC QUESTIONS that require more than a yes or no answer. If a student does give you a yes/no or short answer, ask a follow up question that will encourage him/her to expand, clarify, or justify the answer. USE VOCABULARY THAT STUDENTS CAN UNDERSTAND. ASK QUESTIONS IN AN EVENLY-PACED, EASILY IDENTIFIABLE ORDER. ASK QUESTIONS FROM ALL LEVELS of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. USE QUESTIONS TO HELP STUDENTS CONNECT IMPORTANT CONCEPTS. USE QUESTIONS TO GIVE YOU FEEDBACK on whether students have understood the material. ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR STUDENTS TO ANSWER your questions (10-15 seconds). b.

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. Most important thought during our lives will center on such essential questions. What does it mean to be a good friend? If we were to draw a cluster diagram of the Questioning Toolkit, Essential Questions would be at the center of all the other types of questions. All the other questions and questioning skills serve the purpose of "casting light upon" or illuminating Essential Questions. Most Essential Questions are interdisciplinary in nature. Essential Questions probe the deepest issues confronting us . . . complex and baffling matters which elude simple answers: Life - Death - Marriage - Identity - Purpose - Betrayal - Honor - Integrity - Courage - Temptation - Faith - Leadership - Addiction - Invention - Inspiration. The greatest novels, the greatest plays, the greatest songs and the greatest paintings all explore Essential Questions in some manner. Why do we have to fight wars?

Powerful Questions with Alexandra Barose Part 1) 1/9/2012 4pm Prabha C. filled in for Alexandra - Questions for information are different than powerful questions. Powerful questions lead to greater insight, further thinking, or a change in perspective. - Must listen to a client in order to ask applicable questions. - Powerful questions delve deeper into what the client thinks. - "Can you tell me a little more..." - "The work" by Katy Byron, The four questions: 1. Is it true? - Magazine "Choice" expert series, Nov. 2010, "A proven framework for motivating change." Top 25 Coaching Questions: A proven framework for motivating change by Wendy Gordon based on feedback from Katie Ziemer The coaching questions below are designed to help you explore assessment results, find meaningful connections, and establish a plan for future coaching sessions. To best motivate behavioral change, our 25 favorite coaching questions are broken into six stages. Build Rapport 1. 2. 3. Validate Facts 4. 5. 6. 7. Uncover Development Areas 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning. However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. Tell: Tell children the story by reading the text or having them read the text. Suggest: This involves providing children with choices about what might happen next or possible opinions they might have. For the story, here are some two-question rule sequences:

Questioning Techniques: Research-Based Strategies for Teachers — Energy and the Polar Environment Questioning techniques are a heavily used, and thus widely researched, teaching strategy. Research indicates that asking questions is second only to lecturing. Teachers typically spend anywhere from 35 to 50 percent of their instructional time asking questions. But are these questions effective in raising student achievement? How can teachers ask better questions of their students? How can current educational research inform practice? Teachers ask questions for a variety of purposes, including: To actively involve students in the lessonTo increase motivation or interestTo evaluate students’ preparationTo check on completion of workTo develop critical thinking skillsTo review previous lessonsTo nurture insightsTo assess achievement or mastery of goals and objectivesTo stimulate independent learning A teacher may vary his or her purpose in asking questions during a single lesson, or a single question may have more than one purpose. How many questions should a teacher ask? Cotton, K. 1989.

How Questions Promote Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Learning Across Subject Areas In the last blog, we took a look at the perspective of perspective of Irving Sigel on the importance of asking different kinds of questions as a way of deepening students' social, emotional, and cognitive learning. Coming from a Piaget approach, Irv felt that students needed to go from understanding the material as presented to generating their own thoughts about it. He referred to this as "distancing" -- not the clearest term, but a way of saying that questions could be sequenced toward leading to students' higher order and constructivist thinking by having them take a range of perspectives about a given reading or topic. Continuing with our example using the children's story, "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," you can see below the wide range of questions that can help children think of even a simple story in ways that promote many different kinds and levels of thinking: Low Level Distancing Medium Level Distancing High-Level Distancing There is no formula for asking questions, of course.

41 Change Questions Change is the only constant in the world, there’s no doubt about it. Today more than ever, businesses must face – and effectively manage – rising change and complexity. Uncertainty is everywhere we look. From marketplace shifts to surprise disruptions, managing this new reality is not an easy task. If you think about our organizations today, they are all part of a dynamic business network of relationships with customers, partners and suppliers that shape the way we do business. Bottom line is that the time is up for sitting on the sidelines. As you consider the processes that make your business run, here are 41 key questions you should ask yourself: Does your organization change effectively when it needs to? Tags: ceo business-agility business-leader featured change questions cio agile cto complexity it-leader

A Primer In Effective Questioning Strategies For Classroom & eLearning - by Rosa Fattahi, WizIQ The Importance of Questioning in the Learning Process Since the ancient days of philosopher Socrates, asking questions has been a critical part of the teaching and learning process. The well-known question-and-answer technique that Socrates employed with his pupils demonstrated how well dialogue and discourse work to stimulate students, encourage more complex thinking, and help them learn. For educators, verbal questioning also helps foster a sense of community in the classroom and keeps students engaged in the instructional process. Questions are invaluable teaching tools that serve many functions in the teaching and learning processes. Assess knowledge and learningPrompt students to clarify, expand, and support their claimsDirect students to engage in discussion or debateEncourage students to question their own thought process or reasoningApply class concepts to real-world scenarios Effective Questioning Addresses a Range of Cognitive Skills Bloom’s Taxonomy

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