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Quantum Mechanics

Quantum Mechanics

http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/topic.html?topic=Quantum%20Mechanics&limit=20

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The Wicker Man (1973 Edit Storyline Sgt. Finite potential well The finite potential well (also known as the finite square well) is a concept from quantum mechanics. It is an extension of the infinite potential well, in which a particle is confined to a box, but one which has finite potential walls. Unlike the infinite potential well, there is a probability associated with the particle being found outside the box. Nanotechnology Basics Home > Introduction > Nanotechnology Basics Nanotechnology Basics Last Updated: Friday, 14-Jun-2013 09:28:04 PDT What is Nanotechnology? Answers differ depending on who you ask, and their background. Broadly speaking however, nanotechnology is the act of purposefully manipulating matter at the atomic scale, otherwise known as the "nanoscale." Blog Archive » First Time Growers: Common Mistakes tFS Note: This is the first in a series of marijuana cultivation posts aimed at first time growers. Our guest author is Silvio from WeedFarmer.net – the comprehensive growing guide blog. Welcome Silvio to theFreshScent and be sure to give your own input on his articles. Growing is easy right?

Sleep deprivation Physiological effects[edit] Main health effects of sleep deprivation. Minor dark circles, in addition to a hint of eye bags, a combination suggestive of minor sleep deprivation. HomeschoolScientist Upload TheHomeschoolScientist.com Subscription preferences Loading... Working... HomeschoolScientist Particle in a box In quantum mechanics, the particle in a box model (also known as the infinite potential well or the infinite square well) describes a particle free to move in a small space surrounded by impenetrable barriers. The model is mainly used as a hypothetical example to illustrate the differences between classical and quantum systems. In classical systems, for example a ball trapped inside a large box, the particle can move at any speed within the box and it is no more likely to be found at one position than another.

Penn study shows why sleep is needed to form memories PHILADELPHIA – If you ever argued with your mother when she told you to get some sleep after studying for an exam instead of pulling an all-nighter, you owe her an apology, because it turns out she's right. And now, scientists are beginning to understand why. In research published this week in Neuron, Marcos Frank, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, postdoctoral researcher Sara Aton, PhD, and colleagues describe for the first time how cellular changes in the sleeping brain promote the formation of memories. "This is the first real direct insight into how the brain, on a cellular level, changes the strength of its connections during sleep," Frank says. The findings, says Frank, reveal that the brain during sleep is fundamentally different from the brain during wakefulness. "We find that the biochemical changes are simply not happening in the neurons of animals that are awake," Frank says.

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