background preloader

Perspectives of Hans Bethe

Perspectives of Hans Bethe
Three Lectures by Hans Bethe IN 1999, legendary theoretical physicist Hans Bethe delivered three lectures on quantum theory to his neighbors at the Kendal of Ithaca retirement community (near Cornell University). Given by Professor Bethe at age 93, the lectures are presented here as streaming videos synchronized with slides of his talking points and archival material. Intended for an audience of Professor Bethe's neighbors at Kendal, the lectures hold appeal for experts and non-experts alike. The presentation makes use of limited mathematics while focusing on the personal and historical perspectives of one of the principal architects of quantum theory whose career in physics spans 75 years. A video introduction and appreciation are provided by Professor Silvan S.

http://bethe.cornell.edu/

Related:  risullyPhysics Course MaterialsInnovation, science, philosophyQUANTUM PHYSICS 2Knowledge

Maxwell's equations Quote So if Coulombs law works best for you, then use coulomb's law - there's no need to re-invent the wheel. As far as the original problem goes it is solved, but it uncovered great many things for me, so what is left now is curiosity because this solution implies Coulomb's and Biot-Savart law tell different and more complete story than Maxwell's equations and yet they are supposed to talk about the same E and B fields. There are two kinds of fields, "radial" like gravity and electric fields, and we have "rotational", like vortexes, whirlpools or magnetic fields. Uniform and constant "radial" field potentials have zero divergence and zero rotation (curl), it's a uniform magnitude distribution and inverse square law which defines topology and geometry of an electric field, not the other way around.

Small World of Words Project Welcome to the small world of words project! Last modified: April 16, 2014 Voor Nederlandstalige informatie, klik hier The small world of words project is a large-scale scientific study that aims to build a map of the human lexicon in the major languages of the world and make this information widely available. Atoms Reach Record Temperature, Colder than Absolute Zero Absolute zero is often thought to be the coldest temperature possible. But now researchers show they can achieve even lower temperatures for a strange realm of "negative temperatures." Oddly, another way to look at these negative temperatures is to consider them hotter than infinity, researchers added.

Neutron stars M. Coleman Miller Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland Welcome to my neutron star page! The Brain—Information about the Brain 1 Introduction “I think, therefore I am.” —René Descartes, 17th-century philosopher Few of us question the crucial importance of the brain. It is vital to our existence. Seminar: Visualizing Special Relativity The following text is that of a seminar presented to the ANU Physics Department on 25 September 1997. Note that the links to animations will not function. Animations may be downloaded elsewhere. Antony Searle Australian National University Distinguished Scholars Program Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history Smarthistory offers more than 1500 videos and essays on art from around the world and across time. We are working with more than 200 art historians and some of the world's most important museums to make the best art history resource anywhere. Use the "subject" pulldown menu (go to "Arts and Humanities") at the top of this window or click on the headings below to access our content: Art history basics

Physics Community Afire With Rumors of Higgs Boson Discovery One of the biggest debuts in the science world could happen in a matter of weeks: The Higgs boson may finally, really have been discovered. Ever since tantalizing hints of the Higgs turned up in December at the Large Hadron Collider, scientists there have been busily analyzing the results of their energetic particle collisions to further refine their search. “The bottom line though is now clear: There’s something there which looks like a Higgs is supposed to look,” wrote mathematician Peter Woit on his blog, Not Even Wrong.

Quick Start iTunes makes it fun and easy to organize and play your favorite music. Now, you can also add educational recordings from Stanford University to your iTunes library. From there, you'll be able to create custom playlists, sync to your iPod, burn CDs, or even share your Stanford-related content with others on your network. Ready.

Top 10 Most Dangerous Plants in the World 1. Most likely to eat a rat Giant Pitcher Plant: Nepenthes attenboroughii

(Personal and Historical Perspectives of Hans Bethe) by betlamed Aug 17

Related:  InterestingQuantum PhysicsQuantum Mechanicsquantum mechanicsMathematics & LogicScience and stuffphysicsPhysicsPhysicsperpapQuantum StuffScienceHistorySTEMPhysicsQuantum WorldQuantum mechanicsQuantum MechanicsUniverseThings to LearnQuantum PhysicsPhysicsLearning!PhysicsThe StarsChemistryPhysicsphysics1scienceScience