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Wormhole

Wormhole
A wormhole, officially known as an Einstein–Rosen bridge, is a hypothetical topological feature of spacetime that would fundamentally be a "shortcut" through spacetime. A wormhole is much like a tunnel with two ends each in separate points in spacetime. For a simplified notion of a wormhole, visualize space as a two-dimensional (2D) surface. In this case, a wormhole can be pictured as a hole in that surface that leads into a 3D tube (the inside surface of a cylinder). This tube then re-emerges at another location on the 2D surface with a similar hole as the entrance. An actual wormhole would be analogous to this but with the spatial dimensions raised by one. Researchers have no observational evidence for wormholes, but the equations of the theory of general relativity have valid solutions that contain wormholes. "Embedding diagram" of a Schwarzschild wormhole (see below). Definition[edit] Characterizing inter-universe wormholes is more difficult. Schwarzschild wormholes[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wormhole

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Predicting the unpredictable: Critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity 1Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA2Dipartimento di Psicologia Generale, Universita di Padova, Padova, Italy3Department of Statistics, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA4Samueli Institute, Alexandria, VA, USA5Consciousness Research Laboratory, Institute of Noetic Sciences, Petaluma, CA, USA A recent meta-analysis of experiments from seven independent laboratories (n = 26) indicates that the human body can apparently detect randomly delivered stimuli occurring 1–10 s in the future (Mossbridge et al., 2012). The key observation in these studies is that human physiology appears to be able to distinguish between unpredictable dichotomous future stimuli, such as emotional vs. neutral images or sound vs. silence. This phenomenon has been called presentiment (as in “feeling the future”).

Classical field theory A physical field can be thought of as the assignment of a physical quantity at each point of space and time. For example, in a weather forecast, the wind velocity during a day over a country is described by assigning a vector to each point in space. Each vector represents the direction of the movement of air at that point.

STEPHEN HAWKING: How to build a time machine By STEPHEN HAWKING Created: 18:47 GMT, 27 April 2010 All you need is a wormhole, the Large Hadron Collider or a rocket that goes really, really fast The Sacred, Spherical Cows of Physics - Issue 13: Symmetry Early in their training, many physics students come across the idea of spherical cows. Cows in the real world—even at their most plump and well-fed—are hardly spherical, and this makes it tricky to calculate things like, say, how their volume or surface area scales with their height. But students learn that these numbers are easy to calculate if they assume the cow is a perfect sphere, or in other words, that it has spherical symmetry. The lesson: Hard problems become easier when certain underlying (though approximate) symmetries are enforced. The lessons of the spherical cow don’t end with the undergraduate classroom, though.

First quantization A first quantization of a physical system is a semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanics, in which particles or physical objects are treated using quantum wave functions but the surrounding environment (for example a potential well or a bulk electromagnetic field or gravitational field) is treated classically. First quantization is appropriate for studying a single quantum-mechanical system being controlled by a laboratory apparatus that is itself large enough that classical mechanics is applicable to most of the apparatus. Theoretical background[edit] The starting point is the notion of quantum states and the observables of the system under consideration.

Mad Scientist Worm-hole Generator This is always the hardest part because a worm-hole generator a work of art (not to mention maniacal genius); therefore, you should choose your parts carefully. You need something to house your generator. I used some sort of strainer, but ultimately, it's up to you. Then you need some parts, use whatever you want, just make sure you can explain how it works. If you can't then you probably won't be able to teleport anywhere.

Wormhole Photon Time Travel - Casimir Energy, Messages The basic principle behind the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is that we’re better off hearing from extraterrestrial intelligence than we are not hearing from extraterrestrial intelligence, but—even assuming we don’t catastrophically screw up first contact (and we may)—we have no guarantee that the alien civilization we reach will share any of our history, values, or priorities. But there’s one alien civilization we can count on to share at least some traits in common with us: the Earth of the future. And having learned of Cambridge physicist Luke Butcher’s discovery this week that Casimir energy may be able to keep a wormhole open long enough to send photons back in time, I have one question: why the heck would we want to do that? Putting aside the issue that we’re nowhere close to having the technology that would be required to do this on any scale, we don’t know what the mortal ramifications of sending messages to our past selves would be.

Quantum electrodynamics In particle physics, quantum electrodynamics (QED) is the relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics. In essence, it describes how light and matter interact and is the first theory where full agreement between quantum mechanics and special relativity is achieved. QED mathematically describes all phenomena involving electrically charged particles interacting by means of exchange of photons and represents the quantum counterpart of classical electromagnetism giving a complete account of matter and light interaction. History[edit] The first formulation of a quantum theory describing radiation and matter interaction is attributed to British scientist Paul Dirac, who (during the 1920s) was first able to compute the coefficient of spontaneous emission of an atom.[2] Difficulties with the theory increased through the end of 1940.

Big Bang Discovery Opens Doors to the "Multiverse" Bored with your old dimensions—up and down, right and left, and back and forth? So tiresome. Take heart, folks. Scientists introduce new cosmic connectivity: Quantum pigeonhole paradox In the 20th century, two revolutions in physics shook the world. One of them was relativity, discovered by Einstein. It revealed that spacetime is not what we experience in everyday life.

There can be no other way! For Seti to eliminate this possibilty is absurd! by robster Aug 1

Exactly! Tell that to the scientists of the Seti program that still believe that the Ets travel only below the speed of light threshold! by gemini61 Aug 1

Is this a method used/exploited by visitors to our planet? How else can they travel so far? by robster Aug 1

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