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Quantum Entanglement Could Stretch Across Time

Quantum Entanglement Could Stretch Across Time
In the weird world of quantum physics, two linked particles can share a single fate, even when they’re miles apart. Now, two physicists have mathematically described how this spooky effect, called entanglement, could also bind particles across time. If their proposal can be tested, it could help process information in quantum computers and test physicists’ basic understanding of the universe. “You can send your quantum state into the future without traversing the middle time,” said quantum physicist S. Jay Olson of Australia’s University of Queensland, lead author of the new study. In ordinary entanglement, two particles (usually electrons or photons) are so intimately bound that they share one quantum state — spin, momentum and a host of other variables — between them. Physicists have figured out how to use entanglement to encrypt messages in uncrackable codes and build ultrafast computers. Olson explained them with a Star Trek analogy. “It stimulated our imaginations,” said Fuentes. Related:  Quantum Entanglement

A Step Towards Quantum Computing: Entangling 10 Billion Particles | 80beats In life, most people try to avoid entanglement, be it with unsavory characters or alarmingly large balls of twine. In the quantum world, entanglement is a necessary step for the super-fast quantum computers of the future. According to a study published by Nature today, physicists have successfully entangled 10 billion quantum bits, otherwise known qubits. But the most significant part of the research is where the entanglement happened–in silicon–because, given that most of modern-day computing is forged in the smithy of silicon technology, this means that researchers may have an easier time incorporating quantum computers into our current gadgets. Quantum entanglement occurs when the quantum state of one particle is linked to the quantum state of another particle, so that you can’t measure one particle without also influencing the other. Spinning particles are all well and nice, but what do they have to do with computing? Image: Stephanie Simmons

Himalayan Glaciers Shrinking, With Some Exceptions | Wired Science An important portion of the Himalaya’s glacier cover is currently stable and, thanks to an insulating layer of debris, may be even growing, a new study finds. The study’s conclusion contradicts a portion of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report that had to be retracted last year because it could not be substantiated. Though the IPCC report stated that the risk of the region’s glaciers “disappearing by the year 2035 and perhaps sooner is very high,” the new study finds that ice cover is stable in the Karakoram mountains, a northern range that holds about half of the Himalaya’s store of frozen water. That’s not to imply that water reservoirs on what’s often called the roof of the world aren’t under stress. Scherler’s team pored over satellite images of 286 glaciers throughout the Himalayas. Indeed, for much of the past century Karakoram’s glaciers were in retreat. In general, the warmer the air above a glacier becomes the faster exposed ice will melt. See Also:

10/23/13, 19:15-- This actually coincides with 10/23/13, 16:19-- This may solve Einstein's Quantum networks advance with entanglement of photons, solid-state qubits A team of Harvard physicists led by Mikhail D. Lukin has achieved the first-ever quantum entanglement of photons and solid-state materials. The work marks a key advance toward practical quantum networks, as the first experimental demonstration of a means by which solid-state quantum bits, or "qubits," can communicate with one another over long distances. Quantum networking applications such as long-distance communication and distributed computing would require the nodes that process and store quantum data in qubits to be connected to one another by entanglement, a state where two different atoms become indelibly linked such that one inherits the properties of the other. "In quantum computing and quantum communication, a big question has been whether or how it would be possible to actually connect qubits, separated by long distances, to one another," says Lukin, professor of physics at Harvard and co-author of a paper describing the work in the journal Nature.

New Doubts Raised About Potential Bee-Killing Pesticide | Wired Science A federal entomologist has become the latest researcher to voice doubts about neonicotinoids, a controversial new type of pesticide that may be linked to the collapse of honeybee populations in the United States. The Independent reports that in a documentary screened in Europe but not yet broadcast stateside, USDA bee specialist Jeffrey Pettis describes exposing two groups of bees, one dosed with a neonicotinoid called imidacloprid, to Nosema, a common honeybee disease. Pesticide-dosed bees proved especially vulnerable to infection. Imidacloprid is manufactured by German agrochemical Bayer, who also manufacture clothianidin, another neonicotinoid. Since its approval, clothianidin has become widespread. Correlation isn’t cause, but there are already grounds for concern about clothianidin. “Clothianidin’s major risk concern is to non-target insects (that is, honey bees),” wrote those researchers. Image: Flickr, Jack Wolf See Also:

10/23/13, 19:19-- This essentially would be Squeeze light to teleport quantum energy - physics-math - 23 January 2014 Putting the squeeze on light may be the key to teleporting energy across vast distances. Although the amount of energy that could theoretically be transmitted is tiny for now, it could be enough to power quantum computers that don't overheat. For years physicists have been smashing distance records for quantum teleportation, which exploits quantum entanglement to send encrypted information. No physical matter is transmitted, and nothing is travelling faster than light. Physicists have done this with light and with matter, such as entangled ions. Quantum toothpaste Theory has it that a vacuum is not truly empty – it is constantly roiling with tiny fluctuations that cause particles to pop in and out of existence. The quantum field in the vacuum of space is usually at its lowest energy level. Light work To get greater reach, Hotta and his colleagues have now applied a twist to their theory that adds squeezed light to the vacuum. Normally, photons travelling through a vacuum arrive randomly.

Quantum Entanglement Whatever happened to one particle would thus immediately affect the other particle, wherever in the universe it may be. Einstein called this "Spooky action at a distance." Amir D. Aczel, Entanglement, The Greatest Mystery In Physics. The Theory When a photon (usually polarized laser light) passes through matter, it will be absorbed by an electron. When the original photon splits into two photons, the resulting photon pair is considered entangled. The process of using certain crystals to split incoming photons into pairs of photons is called parametric down-conversion. Normally the photons exit the crystal such that one is aligned in a horizontally polarized light cone, the other aligned vertically. To illustrate, if an entangled photon meets a vertical polarizing filter (analagous to the fence in Figure 4.4), the photon may or may not pass through. The Practice Experiments have shown that Einstein may have been wrong: entangled photons seem to communicate instantaneously. Figure 5.1.

To Learn Best, Write an Essay | Wired Science Trying to remember what you’ve just studied, then writing it down, may be a surprisingly good way to learn. In a study published January 21 in Science, researchers asked 200 college students to spend five minutes reading a short passage about a scientific subject. Afterwards, they were either told to re-read it several times, as if cramming for a test; make “concept maps” of the material; or spend 10 minutes writing a free-form essay about the passage. One week later, the students were given short-answer tests on what they remembered, and asked to draw logical conclusions from those facts. Students were then asked to draw concept maps from memory, and the essay-writers again did best, beating those students who made concept maps the first time around. The findings are necessarily limited, but do suggest that retrieval practice, as the essay-writing was called, is a powerful learning tool. However, concept mapping and cramming did prove useful in at least one way. See Also:

'Spooky action' builds a wormhole between 'entangled' quantum particles Quantum entanglement, a perplexing phenomenon of quantum mechanics that Albert Einstein once referred to as "spooky action at a distance," could be even spookier than Einstein perceived. Physicists at the University of Washington and Stony Brook University in New York believe the phenomenon might be intrinsically linked with wormholes, hypothetical features of space-time that in popular science fiction can provide a much-faster-than-light shortcut from one part of the universe to another. But here's the catch: One couldn't actually travel, or even communicate, through these wormholes, said Andreas Karch, a UW physics professor. Quantum entanglement occurs when a pair or a group of particles interact in ways that dictate that each particle's behavior is relative to the behavior of the others. The "spooky" part is that, as research has confirmed, the relationship holds true no matter how far apart the particles are – across the room or across several galaxies.

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