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Video channel on TED.com

Video channel on TED.com

http://www.ted.com/themes/how_the_mind_works.html

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Alexander Luria Alexander Romanovich Luria (Russian: Алекса́ндр Рома́нович Лу́рия; 16 July 1902 – 14 August 1977) was a famous Soviet neuropsychologist and developmental psychologist. He was one of the founders of Cultural-Historical Psychology, and a leader of the Vygotsky Circle. Luria's magnum opus was his textbook on neuropsychology titled Higher Cortical Functions in Man (1962) which has been translated into multiple laguages, and which was supplemented with his book titled The Working Brain in the 1970s. Apart from his work with Vygotsky, Luria is widely known for his later work with two extraordinary psychological case studies, his study of a man with a highly advanced memory, published as "The Mind of a Mnemonist", and the study of a man with traumatic brain injury, published as "The Man with a Shattered World". Biography[edit]

How Great Entrepreneurs Think What distinguishes great entrepreneurs? Discussions of entrepreneurial psychology typically focus on creativity, tolerance for risk, and the desire for achievement—enviable traits that, unfortunately, are not very teachable. So Saras Sarasvathy, a professor at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business, set out to determine how expert entrepreneurs think, with the goal of transferring that knowledge to aspiring founders. While still a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon, Sarasvathy—with the guidance of her thesis supervisor, the Nobel laureate Herbert Simon—embarked on an audacious project: to eavesdrop on the thinking of the country's most successful entrepreneurs as they grappled with business problems.

Weird Russian Mind-Control Research Behind Homeland Security Contract -... By Sharon Weinberger MOSCOW -- The future of U.S. anti-terrorism technology could lie near the end of a Moscow subway line in a circular dungeon-like room with a single door and no windows. Here, at the Psychotechnology Research Institute, human subjects submit to experiments aimed at manipulating their subconscious minds. Elena Rusalkina, the silver-haired woman who runs the institute, gestured to the center of the claustrophobic room, where what looked like a dentist's chair sits in front of a glowing computer monitor. "We've had volunteers, a lot of them," she said, the thick concrete walls muffling the noise from the college campus outside. "We worked out a program with (a psychiatric facility) to study criminals.

Stress May Cause The Brain To Become Disconnected Does stress damage the brain? In the March 1st issue of Biological Psychiatry a paper by Tibor Hajszan and colleagues provides an important new chapter to this question. This issue emerged in the 1990’s as an important clinical question with the observation by J. Douglas Bremner and colleagues, then at the VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), that hippocampal volume was reduced in combat veterans with PTSD. This finding was replicated by several, but not all, groups. Why do You Turn Down the Radio When You’re Lost? You’re dri­ving through sub­ur­bia one evening look­ing for the street where you’re sup­posed to have din­ner at a friend’s new house. You slow down to a crawl, turn down the radio, stop talk­ing, and stare at every sign. Why is that?

Kokoro Recearch Center, Kyoto University Funahashi, S. (2013) Thalamic mediodorsal nucleus and its participation in spatial working memory processes: comparison with the prefrontal cortex. Frontier in Neuroscience (in press) Funahashi, S. and Andreau, J.M. (2013) Prefrontal cortex and neural mechanisms of executive function. Thinking Methods: Creative Problem Solving They further divided the six stages into three phases, as follows: 1. Exploring the Challenge (Objective Finding, Fact Finding, and Problem Finding), Generating Ideas (Idea Finding), and Preparing for Action (Solution Finding and Acceptance Finding). Description: Notes on "The Semantics of the Information Elements" This important book was published in July 2006 by three socionists in St. Petersburg — Larisa Kochubeeva, Vladimir Mironov, and Milena Stoyalova — at the conclusion of three years of research without any outside funding. Their task was to clarify which topics, themes, phrases, and words were associated with each of the eight information elements. Obviously, the concept of information elements is central to the field of socionics, and until this book, an understanding of these "facets of reality" was often taken for granted in works on socionics, despite minor discrepancies in descriptions of the information elements from different authors.

Does Stress Change the Brain? Rutgers is a leading national university with an international reputation for excellence. We are also an academic tour de force in New Jersey with a centuries-old devotion to improving life in our home state. Every day at Rutgers, our people—students, faculty, staff, and alumni—learn, teach, seek answers, solve problems, drive the economy, and make a difference. As the primary strategist and key implementer of the university’s comprehensive communications program, the Department of University Communications and Marketing is dedicated to strengthening awareness of the ever unfolding Rutgers story; building support for Rutgers among its multiple constituencies; optimizing the public’s ability to learn about Rutgers and access its many resources; protecting, clarifying, and elevating the Rutgers brand; and helping members of the university community share information and impart their knowledge, both within Rutgers and beyond.

Brain is not fully mature until 30s and 40s (PhysOrg.com) -- New research from the UK shows the brain continues to develop after childhood and puberty, and is not fully developed until people are well into their 30s and 40s. The findings contradict current theories that the brain matures much earlier. Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, a neuroscientist with the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London, said until around a decade ago many scientists had "pretty much assumed that the human brain stopped developing in early childhood," but recent research has found that many regions of the brain continue to develop for a long time afterwards. The prefrontal cortex is the region at the front of the brain just behind the forehead, and is an area of the brain that undergoes the longest period of development. Prof.

speakers who disagree with each other TED2013 kicks off in just 11 days. And, in the very first session, Robert J. Gordon and Erik Brynjolfsson will ascend the stage for a debate on the future of work. While Gordon will focus on how our current ecosystem of innovation is too focused on personal gadgetry, and thus isn’t setting us up to solve the big problems of the future, Brynjolfsson will express the view that the digital revolution is propelling us forward rapidly, giving us a good foundation for future prosperity. It’s shaping up to be a fascinating discussion — one that may well change your mind.

Learn How to Think Different(ly) - Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen by Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen | 10:24 AM September 27, 2011 In the Economist review of our book, The Innovator’s DNA, the reviewer wondered whether genius-level innovators such as Marc Benioff, Jeff Bezos, and Steve Jobs challenge the idea that working adults can really learn how to think differently and become innovators. We don’t think so. Remember, it was Steve Jobs who jump-started the now-famous “Think Different” advertising campaign as a way to inspire consumers and recharge Apple’s innovation efforts. It worked.

Related:  Brainodell