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The Alignment System

The Alignment System
A creature's general moral and personal attitudes are represented by its alignment: lawful good, neutral good, chaotic good, lawful neutral, neutral, chaotic neutral, lawful evil, neutral evil, or chaotic evil. Alignment is a tool for developing your character's identity. It is not a straitjacket for restricting your character. Each alignment represents a broad range of personality types or personal philosophies, so two characters of the same alignment can still be quite different from each other. In addition, few people are completely consistent. Good vs. Good characters and creatures protect innocent life. "Good" implies altruism, respect for life, and a concern for the dignity of sentient beings. "Evil" implies hurting, oppressing, and killing others. People who are neutral with respect to good and evil have compunctions against killing the innocent but lack the commitment to make sacrifices to protect or help others. Being good or evil can be a conscious choice. Law vs.

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How to Flesh out a Country or Region in Your Fantasy RPG World Edit Article Edited by Zach Haffey, Maluniu, Glutted, Nicole Willson and 5 others Hello game master/fantasy author. This is a guide to organizing and sorting out the finer details and aspects of a specific country or region of your world: a format for the living details that help you and your players delve in to the role-playing aspect of your game. Ad File:Plutchik-wheel.svg Cancel Edit Delete Preview revert Text of the note (may include Wiki markup) Could not save your note (edit conflict or other problem). Please copy the text in the edit box below and insert it manually by editing this page. Upon submitting the note will be published multi-licensed under the terms of the CC-BY-SA-3.0 license and of the GFDL, versions 1.2, 1.3, or any later version.

Roleplaying Tips for game masters for all role-playing systems The Mother Of All Character Questionnaires Use this list of questions to construct or add to your own characrer questionnaire. The questions cover different genres and types of details, so feel free to exclude or modify to suit your group. Questions are divided into broad categories. And similar questions and bunched into groups within their category. For brevity, I cut out most follow-up explanation type questions, such as "Why", "how come", and so on.

50 ways to take care of yourself in the arts Image: pixabay.com As a sector, the arts is on the verge of burnout if not already teetering far beyond its edge. Lack of support, the precarious nature of freelance and contract work, the emotional and physical toll of creative and community arts work, frequent requests to work for free, and the undervaluing of work in Australia is confounding. Yet there is a silver lining in that these issues are finally being broached. At the Making Time: Arts and Self-Care conference held by Footscray Community Arts Centre (FCAC) last week, the discussion was stripped bare of the appearances we are often greeted with at exhibition openings, or daily dealings with colleagues and friends. Delegates shared candid accounts of dealings with trauma, mental health difficulties and illuminated the dark corners of community arts work.

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1001 Common Structures in a Village/Town/City This is the revamped version of the old thread, started with some sort of planning. Ever had trouble thinking of random buildings for an urban setting? Ever just drawn some rectangular shapes and said 'OK, that's a building' without bothering to explain it? Ever wonder just what sorts of structures a particular setting has? Ever wondered what sort of mischief you could turn up in a city? Vocational Personality Radar Test Thinker - Analyzes problems deeply with intelligence. You always try to find a logical explanation for something you are interested in. You like things abstract and theoretical.

Character Lifepath (3.5e Variant Rule) A Character Lifepath is not a new or revolutionary idea in the RPG circles. In fact, I do believe most of us over at EN World were pretty stumped when we couldn't readily find a D&D themed lifepath table. This entry looks to build one. And if you are reading this wondering what a Lifepath is - it is simply a progression of tables, each with an assortment of events, items, attitudes and other character defining items, that one randomly rolls on to come up with a varied and fun sketch of a character's life prior to the beginning of the game. A player can then flesh this out to have a fully functioning character background.

Brain Welcome to the pycortex WebGL MRI viewer! This viewer shows how information about thousands of object and action categories is represented across human neocortex. The data come from brain activity measurements made using fMRI while a participant watched hours of movie trailers. Computational modeling procedures were used to determine how 1705 distinct object and action categories are represented in the brain. Further details on this work can be found in this video or in the paper by Huth, Nishimoto, Vu and Gallant (2012), "A continuous semantic space describes the representation of thousands of object and action categories across the human brain", Neuron 2012.

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