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Patrick Dougherty

Patrick Dougherty

http://www.stickwork.net/

Related:  Artistes modernes et contemporainsOther beautiful structures

ORLAN OFFICIAL WEBSITE / SITE OFFICIEL D'ORLAN Exhibition : from the 7th of June to the 22th of September 2013 The Collection as a Character M HKA, Antwerp, Belgium Curators : Anders Kreuger and Nav Haq Cozy Outdoor Fireplace Hut is a Warm Glowing Play Place This artful outdoor fireplace from Haugen/Zohar Architects is integrated with a nearby playground, allowing families a chance to duck in and take the chill out of a cool evening playtime. The fireplace, built on a playground in Trondheim, Norway, is a wonderfully whimsical structure that provides a place not only to warm up, but to spend time telling stories. Its unique shape is reminiscent of traditional Norwegian turf structures, with a hole at the top for the smoke to escape. A concrete base provides a seating area all around the fire, encouraging bonding over scary stories or tall tales. Kids are encouraged to play in the structure, giving it a triple life as a decorative structure, a functional warming-up space, and an extension of the nearby playground. The architects, faced with an extremely limited budget, found an inexpensive building material at a nearby construction site.

Jeff Koons Jeff Koons was born in York, Pennsylvania in 1955. He studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He received a BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1976. Arne Quinze ONE WORLD by The People of Tomorrow Arne Quinze, Tomorrowland & De Schorre are building a state-of-the-art, permanent public artwork and invite the whole world to help. Follow the making of here! www.peopleoftomorrow.com My Secret Garden / Rockstrangers Book Arne Quinze invited author Saskia de Coster for a unique project that will enlargen the scope of both the Rock Strangers project (Ostend) and the Secret Garden exhibition (Rotterdam).

Paramodel: Graffiti-style Rail Track Art What a strange sight: Blue lines covering everything from the floor to the walls and all over the ceiling. If you look close enough at these gigantic blue roots, you realise that it’s all made of plastic rails, more precisely, of blue plastic toy rails we used to play with as kids! And if you look at the patterns longer, you recognise model stations and mountains alongside the rail tracks – one big diorama. You’d eventually find a pinhole-sized goat on top of the model mountain! Paramodel are Yasuhiko Hayashi and Yusuke Nakano, an artist duo from Eastern Osaka, and they unfold such 3D, graffiti-like patterns on any surface: not only on the white walls of a gallery or the floors of a back-street factory, they extend their haptic art all over a Japanese onsen tub and don’t stop with even covering the water surface of a pond. PingMag was eager to meet up with the paramodel duo for a chat during their preparations for the Dialogue with the city exhibition in Yokohama.

treehouses by takashi kobayashi, japan takashi kobayashi is a self-taught designer that has brought treehouse vernacular to the japanese landscape. the carpenter and architect of 120 houses throughout japan, his prolificness is borne of a deep-seated investment in the creation of a new architectural tradition in his country added to the hefty, overall aim of each project- to erode the boundary between man and nature. using reclaimed wood, the designer and his collective treehouse people have developed methods since the first building in 1993 for the arboreal structures balanced on living boughs and limbs that avoid stunting the growth of the tree. stained glass facade complements the wood form image © treehouse people eleavation view image © treehouse people interior view image © treehouse people

La Luna Electrica justement: UranusRelated just got back from Montreal and my car has the diameter of Uranus kilometres on it (top that for nedleyness) (via cinoh-deactivated20120915) (Source : b-asik, via kikisloane) Tiny House In The Outback Once upon a time, I lived in Australia for a while, the thing that remember so clearly is how big the country is and how much space is available. The country is the size of the US, with a population well under 25 million, where 80% of that population lives within 50 miles of the coast, this means that the interior of the continent is very very empty. There is a strong sense of quasi cowboy feel to being in the outback, where I lived while I was there. This house not only captures that sense of the rough and tumble of the bush, but is sustainable too.

Linn Olofsdotter She was born in Sweden, worked in Brazil and is now settled in the Portland area. The prolific illustrator and mixed-media artist Linn Olofsdotter is a global citizen of the most interesting kind. Her own life in different locales gives her many sources of inspiration and most likely helps her flex her illustration muscle to meet the needs of a vast variety of clients. ‘My London’ Installation by nendo for British design company Established & Sons -iOSFlashVideo October 20, 2011, 4:17 pm ‘My London’ Installation by nendo for British design company Established & Sons. The space design for British design company Established & Sons’ exhibition for the 2011 London Design Festival, presented in the company’s showroom in east London. The collection’s theme was ‘My London’, so nendo pasted 15,000 maps of London neighbourhoods printed onto tracing paper onto the walls, creating an installation that recollects that particular atmospheric phenomenon, the London Fog. The installation, an accumulation of intimate individual feelings towards the city, becomes a physical, spatial expression of the dynamic, always ambiguous face of the city.

Japanese House Built by Off Grid Champion - Brian Schulz The Japanese Forest House is a confluence of my love of small spaces, my passion for local materials, and my fascination with tradtional Japanese architecture. For those familiar with the intensely refined art of traditional Japanese carpentry, applying the title of 'Japanese' onto my house might be laying it on a bit thick. It's true I've fallen short of the refinement found in the homes of the upper classes, however, the work still embraces the design principles that make the traditonal tea houses (which were, ironically, modeled after peasant shacks) so appealing.

Inspired by the luminescent jellies found off the British Columbia coast, Jelly Swarm mimics their natural, reactive light behaviour.. /by @tangibleint Created by Tangible Intervention (the public art arm of Tangible Interaction) in collaboration with origami artist, Joseph Wu, Jelly Swarm is a public artwork for the Vancouver Aquarium in BC, Canada. The installation features 94 folded origami jellies, each containing an LED light module, suspended from a custom aluminum structure. Inspired by the luminescent jellies found off the British Columbia coast, Jelly Swarm mimics their natural, reactive light behaviour. It allows visitors to excite the origami jellies into creating beautiful colour and light patterns from a touch screen controller. When left undisturbed by the public, the jellies interact with their closest neighbours, triggering random generative displays of coloured light. The first step was to start shaping custom structural elements in 3D.

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