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TOP TEN UNSOLVED PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS

TOP TEN UNSOLVED PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS

http://www.oglethorpe.edu/faculty/~m_rulison/top10.htm

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Artificial Intelligence - Volume 1: Chatbot NetLogo Model Produced for the book series "Artificial Intelligence"; Author: W. J. Teahan; Publisher: Ventus Publishing Aps, Denmark. powered by NetLogo view/download model file: Chatbot.nlogo girl swept into dream Photographer Beata Cervin, who is based in Stockholm, Sweden, takes an ethereal approach to her body of work labeled Magic. The light and airy aesthetic has the appeal of a sun-soaked fairy tale—bright and dreamy. There's a girlish charm about her photos that seems to not only refresh one's senses but captivate one's imagination. Rather than taking her photography into the depths of the land of the surreal, where there is no sense of direction and nothing is easily translated, Cervin adds hints of oddities, often in the form of light and gravity-defiance. The inexplicable levitating bodies that appear in the photographer's portfolio seem to weightlessly float in the air. It's as though time stands still for this graceful young woman.

£2.2bn superlab where scientists are creating a star on Earth By Daily Mail Reporter Updated: 20:10 GMT, 17 November 2010 It may look like any average building but behind closed doors could lie the answer to safe renewable energy of the future. Here at the National Ignition Facility in Livermore California, scientists are aiming to build the world's first sustainable fusion reactor by 'creating a miniature star on Earth'. State of the Nation If possible, the first images in each set will be true-color, as you would see them with your own eyes. Most images will either be true-color or monochrome (black and white), unless stated otherwise. Many images can be vastly enlarged by clicking on them and choosing a larger size from the Flickr page.

Einstein for Everyone Einstein for Everyone Nullarbor Press 2007revisions 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 Copyright 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 John D. Norton Published by Nullarbor Press, 500 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 with offices in Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15222 All Rights Reserved Why are past, present, and future our only options? But things get awkward if you have a friend. (Use your imagination if necessary.) Low blow, Dr. Dave. Buddhism in the Numbers BUDDHISM IN THE NUMBERS Rev. Jnana - Zen Dharma Teacher - IBMC A Dharma Talk at the IBMC --- The rather inelegant title of today’s talk, “Buddhism in the Numbers”, does an injustice to the elegance of the subject itself, the role of numbers in communicating the dharma. For there is indeed a rich vein of numerical references in Buddhism, primarily in the sutras, but also in related doctrines and teachings. My purpose here this morning is to briefly mine that vein, to bring a greater degree of awareness to the place of numbers that permeate so much of our study and devotion along the Buddhist path. First, a bit of historical and conceptual context.

Fermilab Experiment Hints At Existence of Brand-New Elementary Particle Physicists working with a Fermilab neutrino experiment may have found a new elementary particle whose behavior breaks the known laws of physics. If correct, their results poke holes in the accepted Standard Model of particles and forces, and raise some interesting questions for the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron experiments. The new particle could even explain the existence of dark matter. Working with Fermilab's MiniBooNE experiment — the first part of the larger planned Booster Neutrino Experiment — physicists found evidence for a fourth flavor of neutrino, according to a new paper published in Physical Review Letters. This means there could be another particle we didn't know about, and that it behaves in a way physicists didn't expect. Neutrinos have been mystifying physicists since they were first theorized decades ago.

News Blog: Quantum weirdness wins again: Entanglement clocks in at 10,000+ times faster than light No matter how many times researchers try, there's just no getting around the weirdness of quantum mechanics. In the latest attempt, researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland tried to determine whether entanglement—the fact that measuring a property of one particle instantly determines the property of another—is actually transmitted by some wave-like signal that's fast but not infinitely fast. Their test involved a series of measurements on pairs of entangled photons (particles of light) that were generated in Geneva (satellite view at left) and then split apart by optical fiber to two villages 18 kilometers (11 miles) apart where the team had set up photon detectors. (In 2007, researchers transmitted entangled light 144 kilometers between two of the Canary Islands.) The idea in the new experiment is that the photons in each entangled pair are hitting the distant detectors simultaneously, so there's no time for them to exchange a signal. What might such a theory look like?

Physics Flash Animations We have been increasingly using Flash animations for illustrating Physics content. This page provides access to those animations which may be of general interest. The animations will appear in a separate window. The animations are sorted by category, and the file size of each animation is included in the listing. Also included is the minimum version of the Flash player that is required; the player is available free from The categories are: In addition, I have prepared a small tutorial in using Flash to do Physics animations. Artificial Robotic Hand Transmits Feeling To Nerves Astro Teller has an unusual way of starting a new project: He tries to kill it. Teller is the head of X, formerly called Google X, the advanced technology lab of Alphabet. At X’s headquarters not far from the Googleplex in Mountain View, Calif., Teller leads a group of engineers, inventors, and designers devoted to futuristic “moonshot” projects like self-driving cars, delivery drones, and Internet-beaming balloons. To turn their wild ideas into reality, Teller and his team have developed a unique approach. It starts with trying to prove that whatever it is that you’re trying to do can’t be done—in other words, trying to kill your own idea.

Buddha crime Buddhism and the problem of crime By Bandula Jayawardhana Formerly Editor in-Chief Encyclopaedia of Buddhism "CRIME" is a word we use today to denote any offence against a community as a whole, or one (or more) of its members. At the same time implicit in our use of it, is the sense that it is punishable, or deserving of punishment by a socially-recognised authority. The traditional literature of Buddhism does not seem to possess a word which identically fits our meaning, idle and futile as it is to seek for an equivalent in a religious system with its own highly specialized terminology and its own historical and geographical background. Buddhism, in fact, does not seem to deal with this subject anywhere, doctrinally.

The perfect crime tool: Researchers work on ‘event cloak’ By Agence France-PresseMonday, November 15, 2010 22:54 EDT PARIS — Jewelry robbers, magicians, exam cheats and practical jokers everywhere will have an interest in an offbeat idea launched by physicists on Tuesday: to make the passage of time invisible. The scientists have conceived of a “spacetime cloak” which manipulates light and, in essence, conceals whole events from a viewer. The theory is based on censoring the flow of events, which we perceive as a stream of light particles, also called photons, that strike the retina. By exploiting a characteristic of fiber optics, the flow of photons can be slowed, events edited out and stitched back together, say the team from Imperial College London and Salford University, northwestern England.

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