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10 Strange Things About The Universe

10 Strange Things About The Universe
Space The universe can be a very strange place. While groundbreaking ideas such as quantum theory, relativity and even the Earth going around the Sun might be commonly accepted now, science still continues to show that the universe contains things you might find it difficult to believe, and even more difficult to get your head around. Theoretically, the lowest temperature that can be achieved is absolute zero, exactly ?273.15°C, where the motion of all particles stops completely. However, you can never actually cool something to this temperature because, in quantum mechanics, every particle has a minimum energy, called “zero-point energy,” which you cannot get below. One of the properties of a negative-energy vacuum is that light actually travels faster in it than it does in a normal vacuum, something that may one day allow people to travel faster than the speed of light in a kind of negative-energy vacuum bubble. Relativity of Simultaneity Antimatter Retrocausality

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Space.com Buy This Infographic as a Full-Size Poster Astronomers have discovered more than 700 alien planets beyond the solar system, and the count is rising all the time. Some are large and hot, and others are smaller and cooler, but scientists are still on the lookout for an Earth twin. They just got closer, with the announcement Dec. 5 of a planet found by NASA's Kepler space telescope to lie in the habitable zone around its star where liquid water, and perhaps life, could exist. You can purchase a 20"x60" poster of this SPACE.com infographic on high-quality 14G Photo Paper from the SPACE.com store here: Buy Poster

Black hole binge could test general relativity - space - 03 May 2013 CRACKS in Einstein's theory of relativity could be evident at the heart of our very own galaxy. If new calculations are correct, the enormous black hole that sits at the core of the Milky Way should have Saturn-like rings that offer a safe haven from its irresistible gravitational pull. Einstein came out with his theory of general relativity in 1916. It describes how the effects of gravity emerge from the way space-time is shaped. It has passed every test thrown at it – including the latest, this week – but many physicists still believe general relativity has a chink in its armour.

The Moon is Surrounded by Neon, NASA Probe Reveals Finally, we have proof of the moon’s “noble” heritage! Measurements from NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer, aka LADEE (pronounced “laddie”) have confirmed the long-suspected presence of neon in its atmosphere (neon is one of the noble gases — see what I did there?) along with isotopes of argon and helium. Networks of Genome Data Will Transform Medicine Breakthrough Technical standards that let DNA databases communicate. Why It Matters Usenet Physics FAQ Version Date: March 2013 This list of answers to frequently asked questions in physics was created by Scott Chase in 1992. Its purpose was to provide good answers to questions that had been discussed often in the sci.physics and related Internet news groups. The articles in this FAQ are based on those discussions and on information from good reference sources.

Your Sky by John Walker Welcome to Your Sky, the interactive planetarium of the Web. You can produce maps in the forms described below for any time and date, viewpoint, and observing location. Physicists chip away at mystery of antimatter imbalance (PhysOrg.com) -- Why there is stuff in the universe—more properly, why there is an imbalance between matter and antimatter—is one of the long-standing mysteries of cosmology. A team of researchers working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has just concluded a 10-year-long study of the fate of neutrons in an attempt to resolve the question, the most sensitive such measurement ever made. The universe, they concede, has managed to keep its secret for the time being, but they’ve succeeded in significantly narrowing the number of possible answers. Though the word itself evokes science fiction, antimatter is an ordinary—if highly uncommon—material that cosmologists believe once made up almost exactly half of the substance of the universe.

Congress and NASA: Commercial Crew program is underfunded. Photo by NASA/Kim Shiflett On Saturday, just a few days from now, it will have been 1,500 days that NASA has been relying on Russia to hitch a ride to the International Space Station. It was that long ago when the Space Shuttle Atlantis landed at Kennedy Space Center—the last Shuttle flight to the ISS, and in fact the last Shuttle flight of them all. That was the last time an American rocket carried humans into space. We're More than Stardust — We're Made of the Big Bang Itself Transcript Anna Frebel: The work of stellar archaeology really goes to the heart of the "we are stardust" and "we are children of the stars" statement. You’ve probably heard it all but what does it actually mean? We are mostly made all humans and all life forms that we know of are made mostly of carbon and a bunch of other elements but in much lesser quantities. Where does this carbon come from? Well, you could say it comes from the Earth and yes that is true.

Special Relativity Special Relativity These pages are ok as far as they go, but they are missing the planned highlight, to show you what things actually look like when you travel at near the speed of light. I hope to have the opportunity to develop these pages further as time permits. SIMBAD Astronomical Database SIMBAD on the Web is the WWW interface to the SIMBAD database. It offers the following functionalities: Query by identifiers and around identifiers Query by coordinates, specifying the radius and the equinox Query by bibcode and partial bibcode Sampling with a set of physical criteria Query by lists of objects, coordinates or bibcodes Display charts for list of objects resulting from coordinates query Moreover, the interface provides links with many other data services : Links to the other CDS services: Tables in VizieR, giving access to the whole catalogued data, links to Aladin images, surveys and observatory logs.

Creating Quantum Matter By Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation Experimental physicist Markus Greiner always is searching for new and interesting states of matter. “In the long run, these states of matter might lead to new materials with fantastic properties you can’t even imagine yet,” he says. Greiner, associate physics professor at Harvard University and the recent winner of a prestigious $500,000 “no strings attached” MacArthur Fellowship--popularly known as a “genius” grant--wants to better understand the spatial organization of ultra cold atoms with the goal of learning more about condensed matter physics and quantum mechanics. “It’s pretty cool stuff,” he says, no pun intended. “But it is far from the everyday world, and hard to grasp for the public.”

Gigantic Ice Slab Found on Mars Just Below the Planet's Surface A giant slab of ice as big as California and Texas combined lurks just beneath the surface of Mars between its equator and north pole, researchers say. This ice may be the result of snowfall tens of millions of years ago on Mars, scientists added. Mars is now dry and cold, but lots of evidence suggests that rivers, lakes and seas once covered the planet. Scientists have discovered life virtually wherever there is liquid water on Earth, leading some researchers to believe that life might have evolved on Mars when it was wet, and that life could be there even now, hidden in subterranean aquifers.

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