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UNHCR - The UN Refugee Agency

UNHCR - The UN Refugee Agency
Related:  Geography (Yr 10)Refugees

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees United Nations agency mandated to protect and support refugees The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is a United Nations agency with the mandate to protect refugees, forcibly displaced communities and stateless people, and assist in their voluntary repatriation, local integration or resettlement to a third country. UNHCR‘s mandate does not apply to Palestinian refugees, who are assisted by UNWRA. History[edit] Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Following the demise of the League of Nations and the formation of the United Nations the international community was acutely aware of the refugee crisis following the end of World War II. In the late 1940s, the IRO fell out of favor, but the UN agreed that a body was required to oversee global refugee issues. UNHCR's mandate was originally set out in its statute, annexed to resolution 428 (V) of the United Nations General Assembly of 1950. Function[edit] Palestine refugee mandate[edit] Awards[edit]

Refugee or migrant Refugee or Migrant - word choice matters. © UNHCR GENEVA, July 11 (UNHCR) – With more than 65 million people forcibly displaced globally and boat crossings of the Mediterranean still regularly in the headlines, the terms 'refugee' and 'migrant' are frequently used interchangeably in media and public discourse. But is there a difference between the two, and does it matter? Yes, there is a difference, and it does matter. The two terms have distinct and different meanings, and confusing them leads to problems for both populations. Here's why: Refugees are persons fleeing armed conflict or persecution. Refugees are defined and protected in international law. The protection of refugees has many aspects. Migrants choose to move not because of a direct threat of persecution or death, but mainly to improve their lives by finding work, or in some cases for education, family reunion, or other reasons. For individual governments, this distinction is important. In fact, they happen to be both.

UNIFEM The World Factbook People from nearly every country share information with CIA, and new individuals contact us daily. If you have information you think might interest CIA due to our foreign intelligence collection mission, there are many ways to reach us. If you know of an imminent threat to a location inside the U.S., immediately contact your local law enforcement or FBI Field Office. For threats outside the U.S., contact CIA or go to a U.S. Embassy or Consulate and ask for the information to be passed to a U.S. official. Please know, CIA does not engage in law enforcement. In addition to the options below, individuals contact CIA in a variety of creative ways. If you feel it is safe, consider providing these details with your submission: Your full name Biographic details, such as a photograph of yourself, and a copy of the biographic page of your passport How you got the information you want to share with CIA How to contact you, including your home address and phone number

Why Flee Syria? With the refugee crisis worsening as many Syrians attempt to flee to Europe, many people may find themselves wondering just how the war in that country got so bad, and why so many are fleeing now. Here, then, is a very brief history of the war, written so that anyone can understand it: Syria is a relatively new country: Its borders were constructed by European powers in the 1920s, mashing together several ethnic and religious groups. Since late 1970, a family from one of those smaller groups — the Assads, who are Shia Alawites — have ruled the country in a brutal dictatorship. This regime appeared stable, but when Arab Spring protests began in 2011, it turned out not to be. On March 18, Syrian security forces opened fire on peaceful protestors in the southern city of Deraa, killing three. Perhaps inevitably, Syrians took up arms to defend themselves. Assad deliberately targeted Syria's Sunni Muslim majority, civilian and rebel alike, for slaughter. It worked. (Thomas van Linge)

Australia's aid program The Australian Government’s development policy Australian aid: promoting prosperity, reducing poverty, enhancing stability and performance framework Making Performance Count: enhancing the accountability and effectiveness of Australian aid outline key aspects of our aid program. Documents Australia's development policy and performance framework are available in PDF and Word formats. The need for change The world has changed—and our aid program is changing too. Where we work The Australian aid program now focuses more clearly on our Indo-Pacific region. What we do: re-shaping the aid program The purpose of the aid program is to promote Australia’s national interests by contributing to sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction. A strategic framework will guide the re-shaping of Australia’s aid program over coming years. Figure 1: The strategic framework for the aid program: promoting prosperity, reducing poverty, enhancing stability More details on the priority areas: How we deliver aid

Two Billion Miles [interactive] Australian Aid Australian Aid is the Australian Government agency responsible for managing Australia's overseas aid program. Australian Aid provides advice and support to the Minister for Foreign Affairs, presently the Hon. Julie Bishop MP on development policy, and planned and coordinated poverty reduction activities in partnership with developing countries. History[edit] The agency saw a variety of names and formats. It also saw repeated cuts to aid contributions during its lifetime, as the level of 0.47% of gross domestic product during the Whitlam years was slashed to 0.33% under the Hawke and Keating governments, and has at times been even lower under the Howard government. In 2005 John Howard committed Australia to double Australian aid to about $4 billion a year by 2010. On 18 December 2008, the William J. Operation[edit] Total Australian Official Development Assistance in 2005-06 was A$2,605 million, not all of it administered by AusAID. Projects[edit] Over the past 40 years: Food aid[edit]

The Refugee Project Every day, all over the world, ordinary people must flee their homes for fear of death or persecution. Many leave without notice, taking only what they can carry. Many will never return. They cross oceans and minefields, they risk their lives and their futures. When they cross international borders, they are called refugees. As of 2016, over 20 million refugees were registered with the UN all over the globe. The Refugee Project looks beyond the crises that are currently making headlines and allows viewers to explore all refugee migrations around the world since 1975. About the Data Under international law, the United Nations is responsible for protecting asylum seekers around the world. The Refugee Project does not consider the large number of economic migrants and other undocumented populations, nor does it show the millions of internally displaced persons in troubled countries around the world. Recognition Compare refugee population visually by country

Médecins Sans Frontières Core documents outlining MSF's principles are the Charter,[5] the Chantilly Principles, and the later La Mancha Agreement.[6] Governance is addressed in Section 2 of the Rules portion of this final document. MSF has an associative structure, where operational decisions are made, largely independently, by the five operational centres (Amsterdam, Barcelona-Athens, Brussels, Geneva and Paris). Common policies on core issues are coordinated by the International Council, in which each of the 24 sections (national offices) is represented. The International Council meets in Geneva, Switzerland, where the International Office, which coordinates international activities common to the operational centres, is also based. The organization actively provides health care and medical training to populations in about 70 countries and frequently insists on political responsibility in conflict zones such as Chechnya and Kosovo. Creation[edit] Biafra[edit] 1971 establishment[edit] New leadership[edit]

Ten things you didn’t know about refugees With 45.2 million displaced by violence, persecution or rights abuses, the number of refugees is higher than at any time since 1994, says UNHCR Today is World Refugee Day - and the latest statistics from the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR) show world refugee numbers are higher than at any time since 1994. As U.N. refugee chief Antonio Gutteres put it at a recent news conference: “Each time you blink, another person is forced to flee.” UNHCR’s annual report shows that some 45.2 million people were uprooted by violence, persecution or rights abuses as of the end of last year, but the numbers also challenge some common misconceptions about refugees and displacement. Here are 10 things you may not have known. 1. Until you do, you’re just a person who’s been uprooted within your own country - or an internally displaced person (IDP), to use the aid world jargon. The difference matters because it’s only by crossing a border that you gain the protection of international laws and conventions. 2. 3. 4.

Caritas Internationalis - Towards a civilization of love UNHCR Population Statistics Welcome to the UNHCR Population Statistics Database The database currently contains data about UNHCR's populations of concern from the year 1951 up to 2014 and you can use it to investigate different aspects of these populations: their general composition by location of residence or origin, their status (refugees, asylum seekers, internally displaced persons, etc.), their evolution over time, and so on.. In each of the screens in the system you start by selecting the sub-set of data you are interested in, choosing one or more countries or territories of residence and/or origin. You can focus on specific types of population by checking the boxes for only those you are concerned with, and you can summarise the data by checking the boxes for only those data items by which you wish the data to be broken down. General notes A number of statistics are not shown in this system but are displayed as asterisks (*). UNHCR's populations of concern

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The work of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is humanitarian and non-political. Its principal functions are to provide international protection to refugees and other persons of concern, including stateless people, and to seek durable solutions for them. Protection includes preventing refoulement (the involuntary return of a refugee or a person of concern to a country where he or she may have a well-founded fear of persecution) and ensuring that host countries follow international norms in the treatment of refugees. by jerry_jenkins Dec 12

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