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Yr 12 Legal Studies Queensland Laws Independent Research Project

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A collection of digital resources to support students completing the Yr 12 Legal Studies Queensland Laws Independent Research Project

Queensland Legislation. Current Legislation. Bills and Legislation - Queensland Parliament. What's new - Queensland Parliament. Supreme Court Library Queensland. Your rights, crime and the law. Why laws exist Laws are the rules under which people carry out their daily lives.

Your rights, crime and the law

They cover almost everything we do, from driving a motor vehicle to attending school or going to a hotel. There are safety regulations that protect people, such as regulations stating that, if your boat is towing a water-skier, you must have a driver and an observer. Get started - Legal Research Guide - UQ Library Guides at University of Queensland Library. Queensland to introduce new laws against fatal punches in plan to stamp out drunken violence. PHOTO: The plan is aimed at stamping out nightlife violence across the state.

Queensland to introduce new laws against fatal punches in plan to stamp out drunken violence

(AAP: Dean Saffron, file photo) Queensland Premier Campbell Newman has announced the State Government will introduce a new law for people who punch and kill someone while drunk. Mr Newman says he is determined to stamp out drunken violence in the state, but does not want to stop people from having fun. The new law is one plank of a draft action plan aimed at stamping out nightlife violence, which also includes establishing 15 “Safe Night Precincts” across the state.

The Labor Opposition, however, says earlier lockouts and closing times are the only way to curb violence. Mr Newman says the law against “unlawful attack occasioning death” will be similar to a manslaughter charge and will have a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. “It will particularly, for example, take away the excuse for accident,” he said. Mr Newman says the legislation will also allow courts to ban people from clubs and pubs. New laws deliver crushing blow to Far North Queensland hoons. COMPACT VEHICLE: Queensland Police in Cairns have crushed six seized vehicles under anti-hooning legislation.

New laws deliver crushing blow to Far North Queensland hoons

Source: News Limited TOUGH new hoon laws have been implemented in the Far North, with police and government following through on their promise of “if you go too far, you lose your car”. Six vehicles impounded for dangerous driving have now been crushed as a result of the Police Powers and Responsibilities Act, which was amended last November to reflect the government’s new hard line on hooning. Acting Assistant Commissioner for the Northern region Paul Taylor said the crushing not only sent a strong message to hoons but would also result in safer roads for all residents. “Hooning is a great risk to members of the community like you and I and our families, when we have idiots thinking suburban streets are a private racetrack,” he said.

New smoking laws welcomed - Cancer Council Queensland. Cancer Council Queensland has welcomed the Queensland Government’s introduction of tougher anti-tobacco laws today banning smoking in cars carrying children under 16.

New smoking laws welcomed - Cancer Council Queensland

Spokesperson for Cancer Council Queensland, Anne Savage, said the reforms would help to protect young people from the harmful effects of tobacco. “Children are especially vulnerable to the health effects of tobacco smoke because their lungs and immune systems are still developing. “Exposure to concentrated sources of second-hand tobacco smoke in confined spaces, such as cars, can lead to poor health, lung disease and death. “We hope the Government will extend this law to protect all young people under the age of 18.” New Education Resource on QLD Bikie Laws - Rule of Law Institute. Download the PDF The Rule of Law Institute of Australia (RoLIA) has produced a new education resource for secondary students in Queensland to help them understand the laws recently passed to deal with organised crime in Queensland.

New Education Resource on QLD Bikie Laws - Rule of Law Institute

The booklet explains aspects of the following issues: The VLAD Act for declaring ‘vicious lawless associates’ and the required mandatory sentencesNew anti-association laws for members of criminal organisations associating in public placesCompulsory examinations and contempt proceedings by the Crime and Misconduct Commission RoLIA hopes this resource will allow for considered discussion of these laws and the way in which they affect equality before the law in Queensland. Queensland’s new cycling laws divide community, as 83-year-old man taken to Redcliffe Hospital after a crash with a car. WHERES OUR 1M?

Queensland’s new cycling laws divide community, as 83-year-old man taken to Redcliffe Hospital after a crash with a car

Cyclists confront Brisbane motorist. Courtesy: YouTube Carlton's Mitch Robinson has been handed a two-match ban for his bump on North Melbourne's Leigh Adams. Jay Schulz, Paul Stewart and Bernie Vince have all been cleared. The future of Queensland’s liquor licensing laws, compared with New South Wales - Media, Telecoms, IT, Entertainment - Australia. Last month, the New South Wales Premier Barry O'Farrell announced a suite of measures to tackle alcohol and drug fuelled violence following the recent tragic deaths of teenagers Daniel Christie and Thomas Kelly in Sydney that received wide spread attention in the media.

The future of Queensland’s liquor licensing laws, compared with New South Wales - Media, Telecoms, IT, Entertainment - Australia

The New South Wales Parliament passed the Liquor Amendment Bill 2014 (NSW)1 to amend the State's existing liquor laws by, among other things, introducing:2 a 1.30 am lockout and 3 am last drinks for Kings Cross to Darling Harbour, The Rocks to Haymarket and Darlinghurst; a new state-wide 10 pm closing times for all bottle shops and liquor stores; and a precinct wide freeze on new liquor licences for pubs and clubs in the Sydney CBD. In addition to these amendments, the Premier also announced the following tougher penalties for crimes where drugs or alcohol are contributing factors:3. Queensland Passing New Laws To Crack Down On 'Facebook Parties' Remember those laws Queensland was working on to combat so-called “Facebook parties”?

Queensland Passing New Laws To Crack Down On 'Facebook Parties'

They’re set to go before Parliament this week. If you’re caught running a party that has got out of hand, you’re in for the legal high-jump. Basically, if you’re caught running or attending an “out-of-control” party, or “Facebook party” as it’s being bastardised as under these new laws, you’ll face a maximum penalty of 12 months jail or a fine of $12,100. If police experience resistance, or “aggravated and violent circumstances” as it’s described, that fine goes up to $18,150 or a penalty of three years in jail. Worse still, parents of party hosts may be dragged into the mix and face the same jail term or fine amount as the kids organising or attending the parties under the new law. It’s a little vague calling these events “Facebook parties”, considering that you don’t exactly need the Facebook platform to host a party that can get out of control.

New Qld laws aim to stop young offenders. Qld Government's tough anti-bikie laws passed after marathon debate in Parliament. By Brad Ryan, Simon Santow and staff Updated Thu 17 Oct 2013, 8:49am AEDT.

Qld Government's tough anti-bikie laws passed after marathon debate in Parliament

New laws in bikie war pass Queensland Parliament. The Courier Mail Watch more A LAWFUL motorcycle rider will ride to Queensland Parliament once he receives 10,000 signatures on a petition calling for "fairness" in the face of tough new bikie laws.

New laws in bikie war pass Queensland Parliament

The petition calling on the Queensland government and police to treat motorcyclists with "fairness" has attracted almost 4500 signatures. FactCheck: will the Queensland bikie laws affect innocent riders? “This legislation will target only criminal motorcycle gang members. Other law abiding motorbike riders have nothing to worry about,” Queensland Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie, press release, October 8. As part of a statewide crackdown, the Queensland government last week passed new laws targeting outlaw bikie gangs. Queensland is now one of a few states attempting to target and prevent crimes associated with motorcycle gangs.

Same-sex marriage. 10 February 2012 Mary Anne Neilsen Law and Bills Digest Section Contents Introduction. Marriage, weddings and registered relationships. MARRIAGE ACT 1961. High Court throws out ACT's same-sex marriage laws. Updated After being married for less than a week, same-sex couples who wed in the ACT will have their unions annulled after the High Court ruled against the laws. The High Court unanimously ruled that the ACT's laws were inconsistent with the Federal Marriage Act, and were therefore unconstitutional. The ruling is a victory for the Commonwealth, which had launched the appeal against the laws. Queensland needs harsher sentences for murderers. LIFE should mean a person's actual life, not just 15 years. This has been the sentiment of people on social media in the past few days - since Brett Peter Cowan was sentenced for murdering Sunshine Coast teenager Daniel Morcombe. The issue has been raised before and it is something that needs to be addressed in this state as other states have made moves in the past to up the ante on punishments for serious crimes.

More Jail Time For Murders And Attacks On Police In Queensland. Murderers and people convicted of attacking police offers will face longer jail time under changes passed by State Parliament. CRIMINAL CODE - SECT 305 305 Punishment of murder. [Index] [Table] [Search] [Search this Act] [Notes] [Noteup] [Previous] [Next] [Download] [Help] 305 Punishment of murder (1) Any person who commits the crime of murder is liable to imprisonment for life, which can not be mitigated or varied under this Code or any other law or is liable to an indefinite sentence under part 10 of the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992. (2) If the person is being sentenced—

The mandatory sentencing debate. Mash-up: Mandatory Sentencing in Australia - Rule of Law Institute.