background preloader

Dan Dennett on our consciousness

Dan Dennett on our consciousness
Related:  Consciousness

How I Was Able to Ace Exams Without Studying | zen habits Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Scott Young of ScottYoung.com. In high school, I rarely studied. Despite that, I graduated second in my class. In university, I generally studied less than an hour or two before major exams. However, over four years, my GPA always sat between an A and an A+. Recently I had to write a law exam worth 100% of my final grade. Right now, I’m guessing most of you think I’m just an arrogant jerk. Why do Some People Learn Quickly? The fact is most of my feats are relatively mundane. The story isn’t about how great I am (I’m certainly not) or even about the fantastic accomplishments of other learners. It’s this different strategy, not just blind luck and arrogance, that separates rapid learners from those who struggle. Most sources say that the difference in IQ scores across a group is roughly half genes and half environment. Rote memorization is based on the theory that if you look at information enough times it will magically be stored inside your head. 1.

Neuron All neurons are electrically excitable, maintaining voltage gradients across their membranes by means of metabolically driven ion pumps, which combine with ion channels embedded in the membrane to generate intracellular-versus-extracellular concentration differences of ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Changes in the cross-membrane voltage can alter the function of voltage-dependent ion channels. If the voltage changes by a large enough amount, an all-or-none electrochemical pulse called an action potential is generated, which travels rapidly along the cell's axon, and activates synaptic connections with other cells when it arrives. Neurons do not undergo cell division. In most cases, neurons are generated by special types of stem cells. A type of glial cell, called astrocytes (named for being somewhat star-shaped), have also been observed to turn into neurons by virtue of the stem cell characteristic pluripotency. Overview[edit] Anatomy and histology[edit]

Morphogenetic Fields And Beyond WHAT’S MISSING? Is there some way in which our description of the New Story is incomplete? I hope so! "Yes, of course, details will continue to change," you may say, "but might there also be some really major aspect that we should be able to see now, yet have overlooked? To explore this question, we need to pull back from the details, and look at some of the fundamental differences between the Old and New Stories. At the heart of the New Story, as I see it, are two testable (and thus contestable) understandings. The Old Story of the Empire Era also, of course, deals with these issues. The cyclic perceptions of the Old Story can be placed within the evolutionary framework of the New Story, where they can carry great wisdom and add to our understanding of interconnection. As for relationships, The Old Story deals with these in terms of boundaries. There is, however, one very important place where we still seem to think that absolute separation applies – between our minds. "Ah ha!

Our brains are wired so we can better hear ourselves speak, new study shows Like the mute button on the TV remote control, our brains filter out unwanted noise so we can focus on what we’re listening to. But when it comes to following our own speech, a new brain study from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that instead of one homogenous mute button, we have a network of volume settings that can selectively silence and amplify the sounds we make and hear. Activity in the auditory cortex when we speak and listen is amplified in some regions of the brain and muted in others. Neuroscientists from UC Berkeley, UCSF and Johns Hopkins University tracked the electrical signals emitted from the brains of hospitalized epilepsy patients. Their findings, published today (Dec. 8, 2010) in the Journal of Neuroscience, offer new clues about how we hear ourselves above the noise of our surroundings and monitor what we say. The auditory cortex is a region of the brain’s temporal lobe that deals with sound.

7 Lessons From the World’s Greatest Minds photo by karlequin Have you ever wished you could go back in time and have a conversation with one of the greatest minds in history? Well, you can’t sorry, they’re dead. Unless of course you’re clairaudient, be my guest. Even though these great teachers have passed on, their words still live, and in them their wisdom. 1. “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.” - Lawrence J. In order for us to achieve our dreams, we must have a vision of our goals. Action: Visualize a life of your wildest dreams. 2. “It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, “Always do what you are afraid to do.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson The best way to learn something is to dive right in to it. Action: You must define your fears in order to conquer them. 3. “All that we are is the result of what we have thought. Our thoughts determine our reality. Action: Create a list of your intentions and desires. 4. Action: Realize that happiness is a choice. 5. 6. 7. Share:

Functional magnetic resonance imaging Researcher checking fMRI images Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) is a functional neuroimaging procedure using MRI technology that measures brain activity by detecting associated changes in blood flow.[1] This technique relies on the fact that cerebral blood flow and neuronal activation are coupled. When an area of the brain is in use, blood flow to that region also increases. The primary form of fMRI uses the Blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) contrast,[2] discovered by Seiji Ogawa. The procedure is similar to MRI but uses the change in magnetization between oxygen-rich and oxygen-poor blood as its basic measure. FMRI is used both in the research world, and to a lesser extent, in the clinical world. Overview[edit] The fMRI concept builds on the earlier MRI scanning technology and the discovery of properties of oxygen-rich blood. History[edit] Three studies in 1992 were the first to explore using the BOLD contrast in humans. Physiology[edit]

Memories of near death experiences: More real than reality? University of Liège researchers have demonstrated that the physiological mechanisms triggered during NDE lead to a more vivid perception not only of imagined events in the history of an individual but also of real events which have taken place in their lives! These surprising results - obtained using an original method which now requires further investigation - are published in PLOS ONE. Seeing a bright light, going through a tunnel, having the feeling of ending up in another 'reality' or leaving one's own body are very well known features of the complex phenomena known as 'Near-Death Experiences ' (NDE), which people who are close to death can experience in particular. The researchers compared the responses provided by three groups of patients, each of which had survived (in a different manner) a coma, and a group of healthy volunteers. The brain, in conditions conducive to such phenomena occurring, is prey to chaos.

70 Things Every Computer Geek Should Know. | Arrow Webzine The term ‘geek’, once used to label a circus freak, has morphed in meaning over the years. What was once an unusual profession transferred into a word indicating social awkwardness. As time has gone on, the word has yet again morphed to indicate a new type of individual: someone who is obsessive over one (or more) particular subjects, whether it be science, photography, electronics, computers, media, or any other field. A geek is one who isn’t satisfied knowing only the surface facts, but instead has a visceral desire to learn everything possible about a particular subject. A techie geek is usually one who knows a little about everything, and is thus the person family and friends turn to whenever they have a question. How to become a real computer Geek? Little known to most, there are many benefits to being a computer geek. You may get the answer here: The Meaning of Technical Acronyms 1. 2. If you rolled your eyes here, that is a good thing. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Teach Your Children Well - Joseph Sobran Because I write about politics, people are forever asking me the best way to teach children how our system of government works. I tell them that they can give their own children a basic civics course right in their own homes. In my own experience as a father, I have discovered several simple devices that can illustrate to a child's mind the principles on which the modern state deals with its citizens. For example, I used to play the simple card game WAR with my son. When your child is a little older, you can teach him about our tax system in a way that is easy to grasp. Make as many rules as possible. When your child has matured sufficiently to understand how the judicial system works, set a bedtime for him and then send him to bed an hour early. Promise often to take him to the movies or the zoo, and then, at the appointed hour, recline in an easy chair with a newspaper and tell him you have changed your plans. Every now and then, without warning, slap your child.

Diffusion MRI Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method which came into existence in the mid-1980s.[1][2][3] It allows the mapping of the diffusion process of molecules, mainly water, in biological tissues, in vivo and non-invasively. Molecular diffusion in tissues is not free, but reflects interactions with many obstacles, such as macromolecules, fibers, membranes, etc. Water molecule diffusion patterns can therefore reveal microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. The first diffusion MRI images of the normal and diseased brain were made public in 1985.[4][5] Since then, diffusion MRI, also referred to as diffusion tensor imaging or DTI (see section below) has been extraordinarily successful. In diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the intensity of each image element (voxel) reflects the best estimate of the rate of water diffusion at that location. Diffusion[edit] Given the concentration and flux where D is the diffusion coefficient.

Why Do Astronauts Experience God? By Rebecca Sato Source: Daily Galaxy In February, 1971, Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell experienced the little understood phenomenon sometimes called the “Overview Effect”. He describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness. Without warning, he says, a feeing of bliss, timelessness, and connectedness began to overwhelm him. He describes becoming instantly and profoundly aware that each of his constituent atoms were connected to the fragile planet he saw in the window and to every other atom in the Universe. He described experiencing an intense awareness that Earth, with its humans, other animal species, and systems were all one synergistic whole. He says the feeling that rushed over him was a sense of interconnected euphoria. Rusty Schweikart experienced it on March 6th 1969 during a spacewalk outside his Apollo 9 vehicle: “When you go around the Earth in an hour and a half, you begin to recognize that your identity is with that whole thing.

Boot and run Linux from a USB flash memory stick 10+ Web Tools To Save Your Butt In School It’s a new year, and the beginning of a new semester in school. Students who didn’t do so hot last year have probably made a New Year resolution to improve their grades. To help you all with the next semester, I’ve decided to make a list of extremely helpful web tools that will make school easier for all the struggling students out there. Enjoy, and good luck with the new semester. 1. Everyone already knows about Sparknotes and Cliffnotes, but there are very few who have used PinkMonkey. Another website you’ll like is Shmoop. Similar Sites: Sparknotes, Cliffnotes, LitSum, GradeSaver, Bookrags 2. One of the things I hate most about school is that for every paper you turn in, professors insist that you cite your sources. Luckily for you, there are a lot of websites that will put together a bibliography for you. My favorite site for this is BibMe. Similar Sites: EasyBib andOttobib. 3. Known as the “worlds largest flashcard library”, FlashCardExchange is the best place to study for tests. 5. 6.

Brain Atlas - Introduction The central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and the spinal cord, immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Weighing about 3 pounds (1.4 kilograms), the brain consists of three main structures: the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem. Cerebrum - divided into two hemispheres (left and right), each consists of four lobes (frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal). – closely packed neuron cell bodies form the grey matter of the brain. Cerebellum – responsible for psychomotor function, the cerebellum co-ordinates sensory input from the inner ear and the muscles to provide accurate control of position and movement. Brainstem – found at the base of the brain, it forms the link between the cerebral cortex, white matter and the spinal cord. Other important areas in the brain include the basal ganglia, thalamus, hypothalamus, ventricles, limbic system, and the reticular activating system. Basal Ganglia Thalamus and Hypothalamus Ventricles Limbic System Reticular Activating System Glia

The naturalist theory of consciousness is not the only one and its something Hawkins and Dennett are struggling to answer because its one of the most pervasive and unsettling ones in Philosophy. His book "consciousness explained" is a long way from ending the debate. Dennett is an excellent writer, however. by vatterspun Dec 8

Dan Dennett argues that each person should give up his beliefs about being an expert about his/her own consiousness. He shows that the mind does tricks without you being aware how it does them. Dennett's argument supports Hawkins's case for giving up common misconceptions to form a theory of mind. by kaspervandenberg Dec 8

Related:  to be sorted 2How the Mind Worksd'ingénieur//ThinkTankMedicalDreamsThe Mind is FlatPhilosophyPhilosophyGeneral InfoSpiritualScienceArteducation reformInterestingTheory of MindNeurocienciaciarankohlilynchPodcasts/VideosThe WillConsciousnessinformationaltbagthomasSelf-developmentPhilosophycbyron10