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Altered state of consciousness

Altered state of consciousness
An altered state of consciousness (ASC),[1] also called altered state of mind, is any condition which is significantly different from a normal waking beta wave state. The expression was used as early as 1966 by Arnold M. Ludwig[2] and brought into common usage from 1969 by Charles Tart.[3][4] It describes induced changes in one's mental state, almost always temporary. Concept[edit] The term "altered state of consciousness" was introduced and defined by Ludwig in 1966.[5] An altered state of consciousness is any mental state induced by physiological, psychological, or pharmacological maneuvers or agents, which deviates from the normal waking state of consciousness.[5] Some observable abnormal and sluggish behaviors meet the criteria for altered state of consciousness.[6] Altered states of consciousness can also be associated with artistic creativity[7] or different focus levels. Causes[edit] Accidental and PathologicalIntentional: RecreationalSpiritual & religious Traumatic experience Topics Related:  Psychology : Consciousness Learning and Memory

American Psychological Association (APA) The psychedelic mind expresses coherence and plasticity with all that is. It unifies the spiritual and material with a cosmic glue that sticks and drips with a smiley smile The psychedelic mind expresses coherence and plasticity with all that is. It unifies the spiritual and material with a cosmic glue that sticks and drips with a smiley smile. External Stimuli : www.mars-1.com, MARS 1 flickr Themes : Art Nodes : creamy, dreamy, Mario Martinez, MARS 1, Painting, psychedelic, taffy The Cognitive Costs of Multitasking By Kendra Cherry Updated May 22, 2015. Quick Overview: Multitasking can reduce productivity by approximately 40-percent according to some researchers.Switching from one task to another makes it difficult to tune out distractions and can cause mental blocks that can slow you down. Is All That Multitasking Really Making You More Productive? Take a moment and think about all of the things you are doing right now. Perhaps you're also listening to music, texting a friend, checking your email in another browser tab, or playing a computer game. If you are doing several different things at once, then you may be what researchers refer to as a "heavy multitasker." In the past, many people believed that multitasking was a good way to increase productivity. continue reading below our video Play Video Recent research, however, has demonstrated that that switching from one task to the next takes a serious toll on productivity. What the Research on Multitasking Suggests Learn more about: References

The Jungle Prescription Freud's Conscious and Unconscious Mind By Kendra Cherry Updated December 17, 2015. Psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud believed that behavior and personality derives from the constant and unique interaction of conflicting psychological forces that operate at three different levels of awareness: the preconscious, the conscious, and the unconscious. What do these terms mean? What exactly happens at each level of awareness? The Mind According to Freud Many of us have experienced what is commonly referred to as a Freudian slip. These misstatements are believed to reveal underlying, unconscious thoughts or feelings. James has just started a new relationship with a woman he met at school. If you were in this situation, how would you explain this mistake? The psychoanalytic view holds that there are unconscious, inner forces outside of your awareness that are directing your behavior. continue reading below our video Play Video Sigmund Freud was the founder of psychoanalytic theory. Freud's Three Levels of Mind

Welcome to the DMT-Nexus Consciousness 1. History of the issue Questions about the nature of conscious awareness have likely been asked for as long as there have been humans. Neolithic burial practices appear to express spiritual beliefs and provide early evidence for at least minimally reflective thought about the nature of human consciousness (Pearson 1999, Clark and Riel-Salvatore 2001). Nonetheless, some have argued that consciousness as we know it today is a relatively recent historical development that arose sometime after the Homeric era (Jaynes 1974). Although the words “conscious” and “conscience” are used quite differently today, it is likely that the Reformation emphasis on the latter as an inner source of truth played some role in the inward turn so characteristic of the modern reflective view of self. By the beginning of the early modern era in the seventeenth century, consciousness had come full center in thinking about the mind. Locke's contemporary G.W. 2. 2.1 Creature Consciousness Sentience. Wakefulness. 3.

Peak experience Origins[edit] Many of the nuances that the term now connotes were expounded by psychologist Abraham Maslow, in his 1964 work Religions, Values, and Peak Experiences.[1] To some extent the term represents Maslow's attempt to "naturalize" those experiences which have generally been identified as religious experiences and whose origin has, by implication, been thought of as supernatural. Maslow (1970) believed that the origin, core and essence of every known "high religion" was "the private, lonely, personal illumination, revelation, or ecstasy of some acutely sensitive prophet or seer" (p. 19). The nature of peak experiences[edit] Maslow describes how the peak experience tends to be uplifting and ego-transcending; it releases creative energies; it affirms the meaning and value of existence; it gives a sense of purpose to the individual; it gives a feeling of integration; it leaves a permanent mark on the individual, evidently changing them for the better. Sustained Peak Experience[edit]

Consciousness Representation of consciousness from the seventeenth century by Robert Fludd, an English Paracelsian physician Inter-disciplinary perspectives[edit] Recently, consciousness has also become a significant topic of interdisciplinary research in cognitive science, involving fields such as psychology, linguistics, anthropology,[11] neuropsychology and neuroscience. The primary focus is on understanding what it means biologically and psychologically for information to be present in consciousness—that is, on determining the neural and psychological correlates of consciousness. Etymology[edit] A related word was conscientia, which primarily means moral conscience. Dictionary definitions[edit] The dictionary meanings of the word consciousness extend through several centuries and several associated related meanings. One formal definition indicating the range of these related meanings is given in Webster's Third New International Dictionary stating that consciousness is: Philosophy of mind[edit]

Single dose of hallucinogen may create lasting personality change Thursday, September 29, 2011 Psilocybn A single high dose of the hallucinogen psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called "magic mushrooms," was enough to bring about a measureable personality change lasting at least a year in nearly 60 percent of the 51 participants in a new study, according to the Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted it. Lasting change was found in the part of the personality known as openness, which includes traits related to imagination, aesthetics, feelings, abstract ideas and general broad-mindedness. "Normally, if anything, openness tends to decrease as people get older," says study leader Roland R. The research, approved by Johns Hopkins' Institutional Review Board, was funded in part by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. The study participants completed two to five eight-hour drug sessions, with consecutive sessions separated by at least three weeks. This press release has been viewed 1562664 time(s).

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