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Altered state of consciousness

Altered state of consciousness
An altered state of consciousness (ASC),[1] also called altered state of mind, is any condition which is significantly different from a normal waking beta wave state. The expression was used as early as 1966 by Arnold M. Ludwig[2] and brought into common usage from 1969 by Charles Tart.[3][4] It describes induced changes in one's mental state, almost always temporary. Concept[edit] The term "altered state of consciousness" was introduced and defined by Ludwig in 1966.[5] An altered state of consciousness is any mental state induced by physiological, psychological, or pharmacological maneuvers or agents, which deviates from the normal waking state of consciousness.[5] Some observable abnormal and sluggish behaviors meet the criteria for altered state of consciousness.[6] Altered states of consciousness can also be associated with artistic creativity[7] or different focus levels. Causes[edit] Accidental and PathologicalIntentional: RecreationalSpiritual & religious Traumatic experience Topics Related:  Year 12 Consciousness Learning and Memory

Daydream Daydreaming gentleman in 1912 Society and the negative vs. positive aspects[edit] Negative aspects of daydreaming were stressed after human work became dictated by the motion of the tool. As craft production was largely replaced by assembly line that did not allow for any creativity, no place was left for positive aspects of daydreaming. It not only became associated with laziness, but also with danger. For example, in the late 19th century, Toni Nelson argued that some daydreams with grandiose fantasies are self-gratifying attempts at "wish fulfillment". Psychological studies[edit] Freudian psychology interpreted daydreaming as expression of the repressed instincts similarly to those revealing themselves in nighttime dreams. In the late 1960s, cognitive psychologists Jerome L. Humanistic psychology on other hand, found numerous examples of people in creative or artistic careers, such as composers, novelists and filmmakers, developing new ideas through daydreaming. Recent research[edit]

American Psychological Association (APA) n-sphere In mathematics, the n-sphere is the generalization of the ordinary sphere to a n-dimensional space. For any natural number n, an n-sphere of radius r is defined as the set of points in (n + 1)-dimensional Euclidean space which are at distance r from a central point, where the radius r may be any positive real number. Thus, the n-sphere centred at the origin is defined by: It is an n-dimensional manifold in Euclidean (n + 1)-space. In particular: a 0-sphere is the pair of points at the ends of a (one-dimensional) line segment, a 1-sphere is the circle, which is the one-dimensional circumference of a (two-dimensional) disk in the plane, a 2-sphere is the two-dimensional surface of a (three-dimensional) ball in three-dimensional space. Spheres of dimension n > 2 are sometimes called hyperspheres, with 3-spheres sometimes known as glomes. Description[edit] Euclidean coordinates in (n + 1)-space[edit] where c is a center point, and r is the radius. n-ball[edit] Specifically: . and , respectively. where

Empathy Empathy is the capacity to understand what another person is experiencing from within the other person's frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another's shoes.[1] Etymology[edit] The English word is derived from the Ancient Greek word ἐμπάθεια (empatheia), "physical affection, passion, partiality" which comes from ἐν (en), "in, at" and πάθος (pathos), "passion" or "suffering".[2] The term was adapted by Hermann Lotze and Robert Vischer to create the German word Einfühlung ("feeling into"), which was translated by Edward B. Titchener into the English term empathy.[3][4] Alexithymia (the word comes from the Ancient Greek words λέξις (lexis, "diction", "word") and θυμός (thumos, "soul, as the seat of emotion, feeling, and thought") modified by an alpha-privative, literally meaning "without words for emotions"), is a term to describe a state of deficiency in understanding, processing, or describing emotions in oneself.[5] Definition[edit] Applications[edit] Types[edit]

The Cognitive Costs of Multitasking By Kendra Cherry Updated May 22, 2015. Quick Overview: Multitasking can reduce productivity by approximately 40-percent according to some researchers.Switching from one task to another makes it difficult to tune out distractions and can cause mental blocks that can slow you down. Is All That Multitasking Really Making You More Productive? Take a moment and think about all of the things you are doing right now. Perhaps you're also listening to music, texting a friend, checking your email in another browser tab, or playing a computer game. If you are doing several different things at once, then you may be what researchers refer to as a "heavy multitasker." In the past, many people believed that multitasking was a good way to increase productivity. continue reading below our video Play Video Recent research, however, has demonstrated that that switching from one task to the next takes a serious toll on productivity. What the Research on Multitasking Suggests Learn more about: References

Satanism The downward-pointing pentagram is often used to represent Satanism. Satanism is a broad term referring to a group of social movements comprising diverse ideological and philosophical beliefs. Their shared features include symbolic association with, or admiration for the character of Satan, and Prometheus, which are in their view, liberating figures. It was estimated that there were 50,000 Satanists in 1990. There may be as many as one hundred thousand in the world.[1][dead link] Eliphas Lévi's Sabbatic goat (known as The Goat of Mendes or Baphomet) has become one of the most common symbols of Satanism. Although the public practice of Satanism began with the founding of The Church of Satan in 1966, historical precedents exist: a group called the Ophite Cultus Satanas was founded in Ohio by Herbert Arthur Sloane in 1948.[3] Original Satanic practice, however, is intended to be independent. Theistic Satanism[edit] Luciferianism[edit] Palladists[edit] Our Lady of Endor Coven[edit] Islam[edit]

empathy definition, techniques and training, levels of listening theory, listening even.. home » self/personal development » empathy, trust, listening, diffusing conflict and handling complaints empathy skills - for relationships, communications, complaints, customer retention, conflict and levels of listening types Empathy and trust are a platform for effective understanding, communication and relationships. Empathy and trust are essential to develop solutions, win and retain business, and avoiding or diffusing conflict. Empathy and trust are essential for handling complaints and retaining customers. These days we need to be more effective communicators to be successful in business - and in life. A certain legacy of the days of the hard-sell is that many consumers and business people are more reluctant to expose themselves to situations where they may be asked to make a decision. Whether for selling, customer retention, handling complaints, diffusing conflict, empathy helps. trust - and understanding the other person's standpoint The act of doing all this establishes trust.

Freud's Conscious and Unconscious Mind By Kendra Cherry Updated December 17, 2015. Psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud believed that behavior and personality derives from the constant and unique interaction of conflicting psychological forces that operate at three different levels of awareness: the preconscious, the conscious, and the unconscious. What do these terms mean? What exactly happens at each level of awareness? The Mind According to Freud Many of us have experienced what is commonly referred to as a Freudian slip. These misstatements are believed to reveal underlying, unconscious thoughts or feelings. James has just started a new relationship with a woman he met at school. If you were in this situation, how would you explain this mistake? The psychoanalytic view holds that there are unconscious, inner forces outside of your awareness that are directing your behavior. continue reading below our video Play Video Sigmund Freud was the founder of psychoanalytic theory. Freud's Three Levels of Mind

Tantra in America About Tantra in America and the Tantrik Order (From "Spiritual Sex: Secrets of Tantra from the Ice Age to the New Millennium", published by the Pocket Books division of Simon & Schuster, copyright 1997, all rights reserved.) Dr. Bernard | The "Tantrik Order In America" | Controlling Forces | Charter Document | New Tantric Order | Underneath the Seal are thirty-three lines written in flowery English. At either side are two wax seals and the whole composition is held between two rising cobras (symbols of the Kundalini-energy of Tantric tradition) and intricate geometrical motifs. Whoever put this document together must have been very familiar with magical documents created by fraternities such as the Rosicrucians and Freemasons, and with oriental art and esoteric symbolism. The thirty-three lines in English read as follows: "OM! That which has been covered has been revealed to him. New Tantric Order "OM! That which is normally concealed has been revealed to the Initiate.

Slow-wave sleep Slow-wave sleep (SWS), often referred to as deep sleep, consists of stage 3 and 4 of non-rapid eye movement sleep, according to the Rechtschaffen & Kales (R & K) standard of 1968.[2] As of 2008, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has discontinued the use of stage 4,[3][4][5] such that the previous stages 3 and 4 now are combined as stage 3. An epoch (30 seconds of sleep) which consists of 20% or more slow wave (delta) sleep, now is considered to be stage 3. Slow-wave sleep is considered important to consolidate new memories.[6] Sleep deprivation studies with humans suggest that the primary function of slow-wave sleep may be to allow the brain to recover from its daily activities. Discussion[edit] The highest arousal thresholds (i.e. difficulty of awakening, such as by a sound of a particular volume) are observed in deep sleep. In addition to these factors, the duration of SWS periods can be increased by the ingestion of THC,[11][unreliable source?] See also[edit] Notes M.

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