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Is This Your Brain On God?

Is This Your Brain On God?

American Mystic The Movie - Empire8 Productions The Forgetting Pill Erases Painful Memories Forever | Wired Magazine Photo: Dwight Eschliman Jeffrey Mitchell, a volunteer firefighter in the suburbs of Baltimore, came across the accident by chance: A car had smashed into a pickup truck loaded with metal pipes. Mitchell tried to help, but he saw at once that he was too late. The car had rear-ended the truck at high speed, sending a pipe through the windshield and into the chest of the passenger—a young bride returning home from her wedding. There was blood everywhere, staining her white dress crimson. Mitchell couldn’t get the dead woman out of his mind; the tableau was stuck before his eyes. Pushing to remember a traumatic event soon after it occurs doesn’t unburden us—it reinforces the fear and stress. Miraculously, that worked. In recent years, CISD has become exceedingly popular, used by the US Department of Defense, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Israeli army, the United Nations, and the American Red Cross. Mitchell was right about one thing, though. None of this is true.

GOD AND NATURE Before he even opened his mouth, most of the 1,600 people in the audience were on their feet. Hands flew together and a chorus of shouts and whoops filled the large Richmond, Kentucky, auditorium, which had reached capacity well before that warm October night’s Chautauqua lecture was scheduled to start. In three separate viewing rooms in buildings just steps away from the assembly hall at Eastern Kentucky University’s Brock Auditorium, video screens had been erected to simulcast the event to the 600+ disappointed fans turned away at the door. Who was responsible for this adoring, zealous support in a small college town in rural Kentucky? Whose most recent book did this throng of mostly young adults clutch in their hands, hoping to see his autograph scrawled upon its title page? A great British evolutionary biologist—a man hailed for his skill at communicating science to the masses—Richard Dawkins. My own presence in the audience that particular evening was something of a coincidence. 1.

In Texas, young Hindus want to Americanize ancient faith By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor Houston, Texas (CNN) – In many ways, 29-year-old Rishi Bhutada is a traditional Hindu, not so different from his Indian-born parents. An officer at his dad’s pipefitting company, Texas-born Bhutada had an arranged marriage in India three years ago and then brought his wife back to his hometown, where they recently welcomed a son. Bhutada is a strict vegetarian and avoids alcohol, as do many observant Hindus. Complete coverage: Defining America And the dashboard of his Toyota Prius is adorned with a small metal statue of Ganesh, an elephant-headed Hindu god known as the remover of obstacles. And yet Bhutada is a different kind of Hindu than his mom and dad. His parents were part of a major wave of Indians who arrived in the U.S. in the 1960s and ’70s and focused their religious lives on building a community of believers and temples around Houston, which was then a Hindu wilderness. Surprising origins of "Don't Mess with Texas" The U.S.

Alcohol 'more harmful than heroin' says Prof David Nutt 1 November 2010Last updated at 14:11 Professor David Nutt: "In terms of the cost to society, alcohol causes the biggest harm" Alcohol is more harmful than heroin or crack when the overall dangers to the individual and society are considered, according to a study in the Lancet. The report is co-authored by Professor David Nutt, the former government chief drugs adviser who was sacked in 2009. It ranked 20 drugs on 16 measures of harm to users and to wider society. Heroin, crack and crystal meth were deemed worst for individuals, with alcohol, heroin and crack cocaine worst for society, and alcohol worst overall. Harm score Professor Nutt refused to leave the drugs debate when he was sacked from his official post by the former Labour Home Secretary, Alan Johnson. He went on to form the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs, which says it aims to investigate the drug issue without any political interference. 'Valid and necessary' 'Extraordinary lengths' "We are talking about a minority.

Digital Dead Sea Scrolls From Minister To Atheist: A Story Of Losing Faith hide captionTeresa MacBain walks her dog, Gracie, at a park near her Tallahassee, Fla., home. After a lifetime in the church, MacBain came out as an atheist at an American Atheists' convention in Bethesda, Md. Colin Hackley for NPR Teresa MacBain walks her dog, Gracie, at a park near her Tallahassee, Fla., home. After a lifetime in the church, MacBain came out as an atheist at an American Atheists' convention in Bethesda, Md. This is the first in a series of stories on losing faith. Teresa MacBain has a secret, one she's terrified to reveal. "I'm currently an active pastor and I'm also an atheist," she says. MacBain glances nervously around the room. Her secret is taking a toll, eating at her conscience as she goes about her pastoral duties week after week — two sermons every Sunday, singing hymns, praying for the sick when she doesn't believe in the God she's praying to. "On my way to church again. Courtesy of Teresa MacBain Finding Atheism For years, MacBain set her concerns aside.

Wake Up and Dream In today's short, a man confronts a bully, and frees himself from a recurring nightmare that's terrorized him for more than 20 years. Matt Kielty introduces us to Steve Volk, a city reporter in Philadelphia who--for decades--was plagued by a recurring nightmare. It popped up whenever Steve was going through a stressful time, and it always played out exactly the same way. But no matter how self-aware Steve was about his most current set of anxieties, and no matter how hard he tried to rationalize and explain away the dream...he couldn't make it stop. Then one year, Steve started working on a book about topics at the edge of science, and along the way he stumbled into lucid dreaming. Read more: Fringe-ology, by Steve Volk Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, by Stephen LaBerge

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