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Transpersonal psychology

Transpersonal psychology
Issues considered in transpersonal psychology include spiritual self-development, self beyond the ego, peak experiences, mystical experiences, systemic trance, spiritual crises, spiritual evolution, religious conversion, altered states of consciousness, spiritual practices, and other sublime and/or unusually expanded experiences of living. The discipline attempts to describe and integrate spiritual experience within modern psychological theory and to formulate new theory to encompass such experience. Transpersonal psychology has made several contributions to the academic field, and the studies of human development, consciousness and spirituality.[3][4] Transpersonal psychology has also made contributions to the fields of psychotherapy[5] and psychiatry.[6][7] Definition[edit] Lajoie and Shapiro[8] reviewed forty definitions of transpersonal psychology that had appeared in academic literature over the period from 1968 to 1991. Development of the academic field[edit] Origins[edit] Dr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transpersonal_psychology

Related:  Levels of consciousnessPsychology branches and sub-fieldsPsychologyPsychology

Metaphysical naturalism This article is about the worldview. For the working assumption without suggesting absolute truth, see Methodological naturalism. Metaphysical naturalism, also called ontological naturalism, philosophical naturalism and scientific materialism is a worldview which holds that there is nothing but natural elements, principles, and relations of the kind studied by the natural sciences, i.e., those required to understand our physical environment by mathematical modelling.

Industrial and organizational psychology Industrial and organizational psychology (also known as I–O psychology, occupational psychology, work psychology, WO psychology, IWO psychology and business psychology) is the scientific study of human behavior in the workplace and applies psychological theories and principles to organizations. I-O psychologists are trained in the scientist–practitioner model. I-O psychologists contribute to an organization's success by improving the performance, satisfaction, safety, health and well-being of its employees.

Synesthesia How someone with synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers. Synesthetes see characters just as others do (in whichever color actually displayed), yet simultaneously perceive colors as associated to each one. Synesthesia (also spelled synæsthesia or synaesthesia; from the Ancient Greek σύν syn, "together", and αἴσθησις aisthēsis, "sensation") is a neurological phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway.[1][2][3][4] People who report such experiences are known as synesthetes.

Our strength lies in our vulnerability; there's nothing wrong with that Before I was diagnosed with depression back in 2010, I always suppressed my emotions from the world. I was "taught" to do this growing up as a young black man in an urban, impoverished neighborhood. Phrases such as, "Boys don't cry," "Suck it up!" Terence McKenna Land media/McKenna streaming audio and video Rupert Sheldrake hosts many excellent realaudio streams including Trialogues at the Edge of the MilleniumPart I and Part II led by Terence (1.5 hours each) The Trip Receptacles : MP3 clips from all-psychedelic, all-entheogen radio, transmitted via KPFA in Berkeley with Stanislav Grof, Alexander (Sasha) Shulgin, Timothy Leary, Terence McKenna, Albert Hoffman, Rick Strassman, Fritjof Capra, Andrew Weil, D.M. Turner and many others. Several rare video clips at Global Webtrance. Let Talk With Terence! Spoken Word Transcriptions Transcription of Zuvuya's Dream Matrix TelemetryTwo chapters from the audio version of True Hallucinations not included in the printed book!

The Seven Planes of Prajna - Hindupedia, the Hindu Encyclopedia From Hindupedia, the Hindu Encyclopedia By Swami Alokananda Brahman is Satchidananda—existence, knowledge, and bliss absolute—eternal, unchanging, without beginning or end, the plenitude of knowledge, devoid of all activity and transcending all objective categories. Through its omnipotence, Shakti, it willed its own objective manifestation. The indivisible ocean of consciousness was thrown into waves. Though every wave is part of the ocean, yet each is seen as a separate independent entity.

Behavioral neuroscience Behavioral neuroscience, also known as biological psychology,[1] biopsychology, or psychobiology[2] is the application of the principles of biology (in particular neurobiology), to the study of physiological, genetic, and developmental mechanisms of behavior in humans and non-human animals. It typically investigates at the level of neurons, neurotransmitters, brain circuitry and the basic biological processes that underlie normal and abnormal behavior. Often, experiments in behavioral neuroscience involve non-human animal models (such as rats and mice, and non-human primates) which have implications for better understanding of human pathology and therefore contribute to evidence-based practice. History[edit]

Gerontology Gerontology (from the Greek γέρων, geron, "old man" and -λογία, -logy, "study of"; coined by Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov in 1903) is the study of the social, psychological and biological aspects of aging. It is distinguished from geriatrics, which is the branch of medicine that studies the diseases of older adults. Gerontologists include researchers and practitioners in the fields of biology, medicine, criminology, dentistry, social work, physical and occupational therapy, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, economics, political science, architecture, geography, pharmacy, nursing, public health, housing, and anthropology.[1] Gerontology encompasses the following:

Poisonous pedagogy Poisonous pedagogy, also called black pedagogy (from the original German name Schwarze Pädagogik), is a psychological and sociological term describing a subset of traditional child-raising methods which modern sociologists and psychologists describe as repressive and harmful. It includes behaviors and communication that theorists consider to be manipulative or violent, such as corporal punishment.[1] Origin and definitions[edit] "Poisonous pedagogy" is described by these theorists as what happens when a parent (or teacher, nurse, or other caregiver) believes that a young child's behavior demonstrates that the child is infected with the "seeds of evil", and therefore attempts to weed out the evil, either by emotional manipulation or by brute force. Simple examples include the beating of children as punishment for lying, or mothers who refuse to feed their newborn until a set time, in order to "teach him patience, which will be useful for him in later life". Historical background[edit]

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