background preloader

Transpersonal psychology

Transpersonal psychology
Issues considered in transpersonal psychology include spiritual self-development, self beyond the ego, peak experiences, mystical experiences, systemic trance, spiritual crises, spiritual evolution, religious conversion, altered states of consciousness, spiritual practices, and other sublime and/or unusually expanded experiences of living. The discipline attempts to describe and integrate spiritual experience within modern psychological theory and to formulate new theory to encompass such experience. Transpersonal psychology has made several contributions to the academic field, and the studies of human development, consciousness and spirituality.[3][4] Transpersonal psychology has also made contributions to the fields of psychotherapy[5] and psychiatry.[6][7] Definition[edit] Lajoie and Shapiro[8] reviewed forty definitions of transpersonal psychology that had appeared in academic literature over the period from 1968 to 1991. Development of the academic field[edit] Origins[edit] Dr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transpersonal_psychology

Related:  Transpersonal

Ken Wilber Kenneth Earl "Ken" Wilber II (born January 31, 1949, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is an American writer and public speaker. He has written and lectured about mysticism, philosophy, ecology, and developmental psychology. His work formulates what he calls Integral Theory.[1] In 1998 he founded the Integral Institute.[2] Biography[edit] Wilber was born in 1949 in Oklahoma City.

Transpersonal The transpersonal is a phenomenon or experience "in which the sense of identity or self extends beyond (trans) the individual or personal to encompass wider aspects of humankind, life, psyche or cosmos".[1] The term is highly associated with the work of Abraham Maslow and his understanding of "peak experiences", and was first adapted by the human potential movement in the 1960s.[citation needed] Among the psychological sciences that have studied[clarification needed] transpersonal phenomena are Transpersonal psychology, Humanistic psychology and Near-Death Studies.[citation needed] Among the forerunners to the development of transpersonal theory are the school of Psychosynthesis (founded by Roberto Assagioli), and the Analytical school of C.G Jung.[citation needed]

Humanistic psychology Humanistic psychology is a psychological perspective which rose to prominence in the mid-20th century in response to the limitations of Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory and B.F. Skinner's behaviorism.[1] With its roots running from Socrates through the Renaissance, this approach emphasizes individuals inherent drive towards self-actualization and creativity. It typically holds that people are inherently good. It adopts a holistic approach to human existence and pays special attention to such phenomena as creativity, free will, and human potential.

Nick Totton's Page This volume brings together 24 of Nick Totton’s articles and book chapters from the last thirteen years, all exploring in different ways the relationship between therapy, the world and society. A central argument is that therapy, if it is to be effective, cannot and should not be risk-free or risk-averse. Among the themes addressed are professionalisation and regulation; the fetishisation of boundaries; democracy and therapy; intimacy; embodiment; overwhelm; and ecopsychology. Personality and Individuality in the transpersonal relationship The word that you are relates to all other words in all other languages of the Universe. A word has a meaning greater than its individual letters. What so many people do in theireveryday lives is hold onto one word or personal idea and see themselves as that individual word - or world. The Word as a Transpersonal Metaphor

Existential therapy Background[edit] The starting point of existential philosophy (see Warnock, 1970; Macquarrie, 1972; Mace, 1999; Van Deurzen and Kenward, 2005) can be traced back to the nineteenth century and the work of Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche. Both were in conflict with the predominant ideologies of their time and committed to the exploration of reality as it can be experienced in a passionate and personal manner. Kierkegaard (1813–55) protested vigorously against popular misunderstanding and abuse of Christian dogma and the so-called 'objectivity' of science (Kierkegaard, 1841, 1844).

Dr William West research profile - publications Skip to navigation | Skip to main content | Skip to footer Dr William West - publications List of publications Lifestreams - the interconnecting Transpersonal consciousness web of all life Seen and unseen Streams of Consciousness which create the relationships we experience allow information to flow from one to other. They are the Essence of Love which gives meaning and purpose to the Mirror that Life presents to us in our individual lives. The Web of Life is continually moving, changing shape, dimension, expanding and contracting, experiencing of itself through the collective experience.

Existentialism Existentialism is a term applied to the work of certain late 19th- and 20th-century philosophers who, despite profound doctrinal differences,[1][2][3] shared the belief that philosophical thinking begins with the human subject—not merely the thinking subject, but the acting, feeling, living human individual.[4] In existentialism, the individual's starting point is characterized by what has been called "the existential attitude", or a sense of disorientation and confusion in the face of an apparently meaningless or absurd world.[5] Many existentialists have also regarded traditional systematic or academic philosophies, in both style and content, as too abstract and remote from concrete human experience.[6][7] Definitional issues and background[edit] There has never been general agreement on the definition of existentialism. The term is often seen as an historical convenience as it was first applied to many philosophers in hindsight, long after they had died.

Related: