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Institute of Noetic Sciences

Institute of Noetic Sciences

http://noetic.org/

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Analysis predicts extremely disruptive, total transition to EV / autonomous vehicles in 13 years (Tech Xplore)—RethinkX, an independent think tank that analyzes and forecasts disruptive technologies, has released an astonishing report predicting a far more rapid transition to EV/autonomous vehicles than experts are currently predicting. The report is based on an analysis of the so-called technology-adoption S-curve that describes the rapid uptake of truly disruptive technologies like smartphones and the internet. Additionally, the report addresses in detail the massive economic implications of this prediction across various sectors, including energy, transportation and manufacturing.

Free will is back, and maybe we can measure it – Stephen Cave The cat is crouched low to the ground, whiskers brushing grass. It inches forward in minute movements, eyes drilling towards two sparrows just ahead. It tenses, set to spring. Carl Sagan on Alien Abduction Posted 02.27.96 NOVA Carl Sagan was captivated by the notion of life beyond Earth. Yet in this interview, conducted shortly before the well-known champion of science died in 1996, Sagan says that extraterrestrial intelligence is “a wonderful prospect, but requires the most severe and rigorous standards of evidence.” Sagan doubted that the various proponents of so-called “alien abduction” making headlines in the 1990s had met those scientific standards.

MACH: The best and latest in Tech & Innovation Dominic Hogdson / Sentinel-2/ESA Environment Iceberg's break from Antarctic ice shelf is 'geologically imminent' Scientists are eyeing a huge crack in the ice that has grown more than 650 feet in the past month. Why can’t the world’s greatest minds solve the mystery of consciousness? One spring morning in Tucson, Arizona, in 1994, an unknown philosopher named David Chalmers got up to give a talk on consciousness, by which he meant the feeling of being inside your head, looking out – or, to use the kind of language that might give a neuroscientist an aneurysm, of having a soul. Though he didn’t realise it at the time, the young Australian academic was about to ignite a war between philosophers and scientists, by drawing attention to a central mystery of human life – perhaps the central mystery of human life – and revealing how embarrassingly far they were from solving it. The scholars gathered at the University of Arizona – for what would later go down as a landmark conference on the subject – knew they were doing something edgy: in many quarters, consciousness was still taboo, too weird and new agey to take seriously, and some of the scientists in the audience were risking their reputations by attending. Such non-conscious humanoids don’t exist, of course.

History of writing The history of writing is primarily the development of expressing language by letters or other marks[1] and also the study and description of these developments. In the history of how systems of representation of language through graphic means have evolved in different human civilizations, more complete writing systems were preceded by proto-writing, systems of ideographic and/or early mnemonic symbols. True writing, in which the content of a linguistic utterance is encoded so that another reader can reconstruct, with a fair degree of accuracy, the exact utterance written down[A 1] is a later development. It is distinguished from proto-writing which typically avoids encoding grammatical words and affixes, making it more difficult or impossible to reconstruct the exact meaning intended by the writer unless a great deal of context is already known in advance. One of the earliest forms of written expression is cuneiform.[2]

Could humans be Earth's second civilization? “How do you know we’re the only time there’s been a civilization on our own planet?” [said Goddard Institute for Space Studies director Gavin Schmidt]. [T]hat first conversation launched a new study we’ve recently published in the International Journal of Astrobiology. Though neither of us could see it at that moment, Gavin’s penetrating question opened a window not just onto Earth’s past, but also onto our own future. [C]ould researchers find clear evidence that an ancient species built a relatively short-lived industrial civilization long before our own? Perhaps, for example, some early mammal rose briefly to civilization building during the Paleocene epoch about 60 million years ago.

What Is Consciousness? Neuroscientist May Have Answer to the Big Question Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com/Lightspring The following is an excerpt from the new bookConsciousness and the Social Brain by Michael S. A. Graziano (Oxford University Press, 2015): Shop ▾ How Friends Ruin Memory: The Social Conformity Effect Humans are storytelling machines. We don’t passively perceive the world – we tell stories about it, translating the helter-skelter of events into tidy narratives. This is often a helpful habit, helping us make sense of mistakes, consider counterfactuals and extract a sense of meaning from the randomness of life. But our love of stories comes with a serious side-effect: like all good narrators, we tend to forsake the facts when they interfere with the plot. We’re so addicted to the anecdote that we let the truth slip away until, eventually, those stories we tell again and again become exercises in pure fiction. Just the other day I learned that one of my cherished childhood tales – the time my older brother put hot peppers in my Chinese food while I was in the bathroom, thus scorching my young tongue – actually happened to my little sister.

8-Circuit Model of Consciousness The eight-circuit model of consciousness is a theory proposed by Timothy Leary and expanded on by Robert Anton Wilson and Antero Alli. The model describes eight circuits of information (eight "brains") that operate within the human nervous system. Each circuit is concerned with a different sphere of activity. Leary, Alli and Wilson have written about the model in depth and how each circuit operates, both in the lives of individual people and in societies. The term "circuits" came from the first wave of cybernetics research and development in the United States in the 1970s.

Green R&D - Hypergiant Algae is a single-celled organism that is capable of multiplying rapidly through the absorption of sunlight and carbon dioxide. It is considered one of nature’s most efficient machines. Algae can be grown nearly anywhere and it requires very few nutrients to survive. It is high in proteins, lipids, and starches, making it suitable for a variety of uses, including as food. The Hypergiant Eos Bioreactor uses algae, specifically Chlorella Vulgaris which is capable of pulling CO2 from the atmosphere at a much higher rate than any other plant.

How and why exactly did consciousness become a probl... Growing up in Australia, I loved to lie on the grass, immersed in the scent of wattles, and stare up at the sky. A sky like no other; a deeper, richer shade of blue than anywhere else I have been – and I’ve travelled on all seven continents, including Antarctica. Australians speculate that the colour of our sky results from its unusually thin ozone layer, a physical anomaly leading to sensory saturation. Everyone agrees that the sky is blue, but how could I know that what I experience as blue isn’t what you experience as red? The Psychology of Nakedness Editor’s Note: Portions of this story in italics below were found to come from LiveScience. The human mind sees minds everywhere. Show us a collection of bouncing balls and we hallucinate agency; a glance at a stuffed animal and we endow it with a mood; I’m convinced Siri doesn’t like me. The point is that we are constantly translating our visual perceptions into a theory of mind, as we attempt to imagine the internal states of teddy bears, microchips and perfect strangers. Most of the time, this approach works well enough. If I notice someone squinting their eyes and clenching their jaw, I automatically conclude that he must be angry; if she flexes the zygomatic major – that’s what happens during a smile – then I assume she’s happy.

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