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Cal-Earth - The California Institute of Earth Art and Architecture

Cal-Earth - The California Institute of Earth Art and Architecture
Latest News: Updated March 24, 2014 Welcome to Cal-Earth Institute. Click the video below to enjoy the visual journey through the many things that Cal-Earth offers to the community and the world. is a 501(C)3 non-profit/charitable foundation at the cutting edge of Earth and Ceramic Architecture technologies today. Founded in 1986 by its director, Nader Khalili (1936-2008), its scope spans technical innovations published by NASA for lunar and Martian construction, to housing design and development for the world's homeless for the United Nations. Continuing in his tradition, Khalili's associates and apprentices are dedicated to research and education of the public in environmentally oriented arts and architecture.

http://calearth.org/

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Insulated Earthbag Foundations for Yurts Note: If you’re new to earthbag building, first read the introductory Step-by-Step Earthbag Building and How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse . This Instructable includes complete step-by-step instructions on how to make an insulated earthbag foundation. You can use the same process to make insulated foundations for any type of structure – straw bale, earthbag, cordwood, etc.

A Low Impact Woodland Home Built In Wales - Simon Dale - Includes A 1 Minute 42 Second Video A Low Impact Woodland Home Built In Wales You are looking at pictures of a house I built for our family in Wales. It was built by myself and my father in law with help from passers by and visiting friends. 4 months after starting we were moved in and cosy. I estimate 1000-1500 man hours and £3000 put in to this point. Not really so much in house buying terms (roughly £60/sq m excluding labour). The house was built with maximum regard for the environment and by reciprocation gives us a unique opportunity to live close to nature. Sol Duc Cabin Project Details Built for a client who fly-fishes for steelhead on the Olympic Peninsula, this steel-clad 350 sf cabin on stilts can be completely shuttered when the owner is away. The cabin’s rugged patina and raw materiality respond to the surrounding wilderness while its verticality provides a safe haven during occasional floods from the nearby river. The overall design responds to the owner’s desire for a compact, low-maintenance, virtually indestructible building to house himself and his wife during fishing expeditions. Composed of two levels, the cabin’s entry, dining and kitchen areas are located on the lower floor while a sleeping loft with minimal shelving hovers above. A cantilevered steel deck extends from the lower level, providing unimpeded views of the river.

earth-sheltered home Also known simply as an earth home, a dwelling that is partially or totally underground (see underground home) or that has earth berms around some or all of its exterior walls (see bermed earth-sheltered home). Earth-sheltered homes can be tailored to a wide range of climates and a variety of types of building sites – even flat ones. Combined with passive solar design, an earth-sheltered home can save tens of thousands of dollars in fuel bills over a lifetime. Earth-sheltered homes are comfortable, affordable and energy efficient. And, if thoughtfully designed, they allow in plenty of natural light and are far less of an imposition on the landscape than conventional above-ground houses.

Comment construire un toit à ossature réciproque A reciprocal roof frame This is a long-delayed post about building my reciprocal roof frame. This entry documents the details of building my reciprocal roof frame, including the type of wood I used, the number of rafters, and the work process itself. One Natural Builder's Next Big Adventure Called: The Fossil Fuel-Free House Morgan Caraway is a natural builder, homesteader, intentional community co-founder and author. In 2009 his wife, Mary Jane, and he moved on to a piece of undeveloped land in the Blue Ridge Mountains and began a homesteading adventure. Theye built a yurt, earthbag house and a cordwood bath house.

The Shoebox Tiny house on wheels built by Tennessee Tiny Homes. Photographed by Butch Boyd. These Tiny Wooden Houses Are The College Dorm Of The Future A few years ago, Swedish student housing company AF Bostäder had a young woman from the city of Lund inside live in a tiny house-box--not even 10 square meters large--to test the idea of a cheap, cheerful, and environmentally friendly “smart student unit" that included a toilet, kitchen, and bed. “I think she still lives there,” says Linda Camara of Tengbom Architects, the company behind the 2013 iteration of the living pod--a petite vision in pale wood offset with lime green plant pots, cushions and stools. The premise for the cube, which has been in the works since 2007, is reasonable enough: students live and die on cheap housing, but everyone needs a toilet. It’s taken six years to whittle the tiny houses down to the current cross-laminated wooden test model form.

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