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The charming $200 micro houses made from junk

The charming $200 micro houses made from junk
By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 01:49 GMT, 5 April 2012 | Updated: 20:37 GMT, 5 April 2012 Made from scavenged materials, Derek Diedricksen's tiny houses cost just $200 to make. What the little wooden dwellings lack in space, is made up for in style thanks to plenty of decorative detail. The 33-year-old uses parts of discarded household items to ensure each home has basic functions, the glass from the front of a washing machine is converted in a porthole-like window while a sheet of metal becomes a flip down counter. Made from scavenged materials, Derek Diedricksen's tiny houses cost just $200 to make The largest of his structures is the Gypsy Junker at 24 square feet with a roof height of up to 5ft 10inches The Gypsy Junker is made out of shipping pallets, castoff storm windows and discarded kitchen cabinets Ultimate in eco-friendly: Derek Diedricksen's homes are made from household goods 'I’ve always been obsessed with tiny architecture. 'The Hickshaw was the first one I built.'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2125389/The-charming-200-micro-houses-junk.html

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Slumtube: Affordable Housing Made From Shipping Pallets! Remember the efficient and affordable Pallet House from last spring? Well designers Andreas Claus Schnetzer and Pils Gregor have bested their original design with an even lower-cost shipping pallet home that was completed this year in South Africa. The 'Slumtube' utilizes discarded pallets along with other local materials like clay and straw to make an insulated and affordable home that can withstand the extremely hot and cold temperatures of Johannesburg. Schnetzer and Gregor built upon what they learned from constructing modular pallet houses, improving upon their original design to make it even more affordable. In previous designs, the pallets were used as floors, walls, ceilings and cladding, but they required sturdy wood beams, which were the most expensive part of the home.

Papercrete - Wikipedia Entry Papercrete is a construction material which consists of re-pulped paper fiber with Portland cement or clay and/or other soil added. First patented in 1928, it was revived during the 1980s. Although perceived as an environmentally friendly material due to the significant recycled content, this is offset by the presence of cement. The material lacks standardisation, and proper use therefore requires care and experience. Eric Patterson and Mike McCain, who have been credited with independently "inventing" papercrete (they called it "padobe" and "fibrous cement"), have both contributed considerably to research into machinery to make it and ways of using it for building. How to Build Dirt Cheap Houses The following list summarizes some of the potential savings from using natural building materials and alternative construction methods. If you’re wondering why they’re not more widely used, it’s because contractors, banks, realtors and others in the housing industry make more profit from the current system. It’s up to you to get informed and switch to a sustainable lifestyle. 1. Foundation: Insulated frost-protected foundations do not have to be as deep as standard foundations and therefore use fewer materials, require less excavation and backfill, less form work and less labor.

Smart Communities Network: Recycled-Content Building Materials Green Building Principles-- Resource Conservation Recycled-Content Materials Materials Reuse Minimization of Construction Waste Water Conservation Green Roofs Recycled-Content Materials There are many building products available today that are manufactured from recycled materials. For example, organic asphalt shingles contain recycled paper, and some shingles are made from re-manufactured wood fiber. Cellulose insulation is manufactured from recycled newspaper. Photo Gallery Pat's First Cob (1998) This was Patrick's first cob project on his own after taking a one week workshop with Cob Cottage Company (CCC) in 1997. He built the foundation and then used beach logs for the frame. CCC then taught a 2 week course, after which Patrick finished the walls and roof.

What It Really Costs To Build A Tiny Home It amazes me all the claims you read about super cheap tiny house construction. Honestly, I feel these claims are misleading at best. To build any structure meant for extended residency, year round living, costs money. It’ll cost what you have planned and probably much more to settle into living in a small space. My plan parameters were simple. I wanted a comfortable home which meets all my needs, but didn’t cost me 30 years of loan principle and interest. Building With Non-Recyclable Cardboard Bales When we first saw Rich Messer and Ann Dowden’s home built using bales made from laundry detergent boxes (which can’t be recycled because they’re coated in wax), set on a foundation made from bales of postconsumer PVC trash (toys, laundry baskets, shampoo bottles) we thought it was brilliant. Through the years, that snug little house—which looks just like a straw bale—has remained one of my favorites. I love to see people’s reactions when they realize the house is made from garbage.

Ecological Bricks - The Temas Blog « IDB Loan for Sustainable Tourism in Costa Rican Wilderness Areas / Prestamo de BID para turismo sostenible en áreas silvestres de Costa Rica | Home | Implications of the Stern Review for LAC, Part I » By Keith R | December 24, 2006 Topics: Environmental Protection, Waste & Recycling | 13 Comments » (2 votes, average: 3.50 out of 5) Loading ... It’s been interesting to see how much the articles on the Brazilian and Honduran buildings made using PET bottles have captured the imagination of so many readers.

Building With Glass & Plastic Bottles « Protecting the Mesoamerican Reef | Home | The Mercury Threat Posed by Mining in Guyana » By Keith R | July 23, 2007 Topics: "Trash Photos" Series, Waste & Recycling | 7 Comments » Loading ... “¡Viva la Botella!” Construction With PET Bottles - The Temas Blog « BNDES cria linha de apoio para catadores de materiais recicláveis | Home | Como tener éxito trabajando con “basura” en Latinoamérica » By Keith R | November 21, 2006 Topics: Environmental Protection, Waste & Recycling | 47 Comments » (6 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5) How to Construct Houses with Plastic Bottles !! The video shows the strength of a mud filled plastic bottle. When you make a clay brick, the time and energy used right from mixing the clay to baking it in the kiln and taking into account the firewood used for that, you will see that the bottle brick is far more energy-efficient. The technology also reduces the carbon emission that happens during the baking of an ordinary brick . The heat generation from cement factories can also be reduced as this technology uses only five percent cement. The foundation for the entire construction is obtained from building waste and so the mountains from which granite is blasted out can be saved too..

POLLI Bricks: Build A House With Recycled Bottles The creative minds at miniWIZ recently debuted the POLLI-Brick, a recycled polymer bottle that can be interlocked to build an incredible array of structures. Made from recycled PET bottles, the lightweight bricks offer excellent acoustic and thermal insulation and can build anything from fences and roofs to pots for plants, skylights and beautiful walls of light. Anyone who has taken a trip to the United States’ southwest desert has likely seen early examples of recycled-bottle architecture. From miner’s shacks to elaborate residences, these practical and ingenious structures helped early frontiersmen and women settle The West. Now miniWIZ, the creative team that brought us the HYmini, miniNOTE and SOLARBULB, have taken the idea and transformed it into a fantastic new technology. POLLI-Bricks possess incredible thermal and sound insulating characteristics in addition to an awesome strength to weight ratio, which should make them a hit with architects and builders alike.

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