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Alex Steffen: The route to a sustainable future

Alex Steffen: The route to a sustainable future
Related:  Sustainable Development

-New HOme Project « Leifur Thor’s WorldPress Station Imagine a home that provides a level of comfort and ease of living beyond what’s known. Now imagine this home uses less energy while providing that superior standard of living. In this century, wouldn’t we rather have a home that harvests energy quietly instead of using it? An enclosed space three average people with no special skills can assemble noise free, and with no special building tools in three weeks from start to finish. With over 10,000 variations for layout a home we can alter in a day without need of a contractor. When disaster strikes and emergency shelters are needed, weight, cost, and ability to stand up in the elements are the three considerations when relief organizations look to find shelter solutions for people in need. The New Home Project will address both these critical aspects and challenge the idea of shelter by offering a radical departure from traditional shelter construction. The two parts of the New Home Project are- Like this: Like Loading...

What is Sustainable Development? The New Geopolitics of Food - By Lester R. Brown In the United States, when world wheat prices rise by 75 percent, as they have over the last year, it means the difference between a $2 loaf of bread and a loaf costing maybe $2.10. If, however, you live in New Delhi, those skyrocketing costs really matter: A doubling in the world price of wheat actually means that the wheat you carry home from the market to hand-grind into flour for chapatis costs twice as much. And the same is true with rice. If the world price of rice doubles, so does the price of rice in your neighborhood market in Jakarta. And so does the cost of the bowl of boiled rice on an Indonesian family's dinner table. Welcome to the new food economics of 2011: Prices are climbing, but the impact is not at all being felt equally. Already in 2011, the U.N. More alarming still, the world is losing its ability to soften the effect of shortages. That's why the food crisis of 2011 is for real, and why it may bring with it yet more bread riots cum political revolutions.

The Universal Principles of Sustainable Development By Terry Mock and Tony Wernke, SLDI Co-founders Follow Terry and Tony on Twitter: Terry @SustainLandDev; Tony @Sustainable4U This article is Part 3 in the Fractal Sustainable Development Trilogy. Part 1: Designing a ‘Big Wheel’ for Civilization Part 2: Like Life Itself, Sustainable Development is Fractal As a comprehensive sustainable development decision model, The SLDI Code™ functions as a completely integrated, fractal matrix which leads decision-makers from the foundation of triple-bottom-line sustainability to sustainable results. NOTE: The principles embedded in the SLDI Code Sustainable Development Matrix are universal in their application and need not be confined to land development projects. The SLDI Code is not designed to replace or compete with other more narrowly defined programs or regulatory constraints. The SLDI Code™ Sustainable Development Matrix The SLDI Code Sustainable Development Matrix begins with the three bottom lines necessary for sustainable project development.

OECD calls for policy reform and technology to prevent impending water crisis The OECD has released a report outlining the challenges humanity faces to maintain water resources in the future (Photo: Shutterstock) Image Gallery (2 images) Worldwide population growth and the related rapid increase in urbanization is already posing problems in many areas for the management of that most precious of resources, water. With these problems only set to intensify, the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has released a report outlining the challenges humanity faces to maintain water resources in the face of demographic growth and climate change. Called Meeting the Water Reform Challenge, the report says that urgent reform of water policies is crucial in order to preserve human and environmental health as well as economic growth. According to UN figures, more than one billion people lack access to safe drinking water. Global water demand (Source: The Environmental Outlook Baseline,output from IMAGE suite of models) Source: OECD About the Author

17 Apart: Growing Celery Indoors: Never Buy Celery Again Remember when we tested and shared how to grow onions indefinitely last week? Well, at the same time, we've been testing out another little indoor gardening project first gleaned from Pinterest that we're excited to share the successes of today — regrowing celery from it's base. We've figured out how to literally re-grow organic celery from the base of the bunch we bought from the store a couple weeks ago. I swear, we must have been living under a rock all these years or just not be that resourceful when it comes to food, but we're having more fun learning all these new little tips and tricks as we dive deeper into trying to grow more of our own food. This project is almost as simple as the onion growing project — simply chop the celery stalks from the base of the celery you bought from the store and use as you normally would. We let our celery base hang out in the saucer of water for right around one week, give or take. Update 2: Here's how we are looking at almost 3-4 weeks of growth:

Bhutan To Be First Country to Go 100% Organic If there was ever a nation that could see the purpose behind organic, sustainable farming, it would be a nation that is composed mostly of farmers. Such a place does exist, and it soon may be the first nation to go 100% organic, paving the way for others to do the same on a global scale. The Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan is known for a high level of citizen happiness, but it is doing something even more noteworthy in the near future. With Prime Minister Jigmi Thinley making a major announcement regarding the organic farming project at the Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development which took place last month, the move has made national headlines. What this comes down to is no GMO, no pesticides, no herbicides, no fluoride-based spray products, no Monsanto intrusion at all, and a whole lot of high quality food available for the 700,000 citizens of Bhutan. “By working in harmony with nature, they can help sustain the flow of nature’s bounties.”

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