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Cob Houses - Live Debt Free with Sustainable Development

Cob Houses - Live Debt Free with Sustainable Development

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbM2In5Hfx4

Related:  Habitats économes, exemples en VracSustainable Tiny Homes

Photo Gallery Pat's First Cob (1998) This was Patrick's first cob project on his own after taking a one week workshop with Cob Cottage Company (CCC) in 1997. He built the foundation and then used beach logs for the frame. Sol Duc Cabin Project Details Built for a client who fly-fishes for steelhead on the Olympic Peninsula, this steel-clad 350 sf cabin on stilts can be completely shuttered when the owner is away. The cabin’s rugged patina and raw materiality respond to the surrounding wilderness while its verticality provides a safe haven during occasional floods from the nearby river. The overall design responds to the owner’s desire for a compact, low-maintenance, virtually indestructible building to house himself and his wife during fishing expeditions. Composed of two levels, the cabin’s entry, dining and kitchen areas are located on the lower floor while a sleeping loft with minimal shelving hovers above.

The Great Northern Prepper This post was done by a Forum member Alaska Rose, who is a wealth of knowledge of wilderness and homesteading skills. Learn more from her and others on our FORUM This picture shows the most common way to cut the hide for skinning a game animal. The dotted lines around the legs and neck are the usual cuts for removing the head and lower legs. If you do not wish to keep the skin, you may want to just cut any way you can to get it off the animal the quickest way possible. The reasons behind this could be simple, just wanting to get the job done and you are by yourself and it is getting dark and you just know the crackling brush is a large bear coming to check out the smell of blood.

Man Builds Fairy Tale Home for His Family – For Only £3,000 Simon Dale is a family man in Wales, the western part of Great Britain. His interest in self-sustainability and an ecological awareness led him to dig out and build his own home—one of the loveliest, warmest, most inviting dwellings you could ever imagine. And it cost him only £3,000, about $4,700 American dollars! Can you imagine a more charming entrance than this? Simon gives two reasons for building the home.

These Tiny Wooden Houses Are The College Dorm Of The Future A few years ago, Swedish student housing company AF Bostäder had a young woman from the city of Lund inside live in a tiny house-box--not even 10 square meters large--to test the idea of a cheap, cheerful, and environmentally friendly “smart student unit" that included a toilet, kitchen, and bed. “I think she still lives there,” says Linda Camara of Tengbom Architects, the company behind the 2013 iteration of the living pod--a petite vision in pale wood offset with lime green plant pots, cushions and stools. The premise for the cube, which has been in the works since 2007, is reasonable enough: students live and die on cheap housing, but everyone needs a toilet.

Hobbit Houses: 15 Grassy Hill-Shaped Dwellings “In a hole in a ground lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing to sit on or eat: It was a hobbit hole and that means comfort.” This line by J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the beloved The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings fantasy novels, has inspired hundreds of copycat underground hobbit homes around the world – and is itself inspired by ancient Viking hill houses. These 15 green-roofed dwellings that take a page right out of Tolkien’s books come in all sizes for all kinds of functions, from hotels in New Zealand to backyard playhouses and vintage underground hill-dug duplexes.

Triple Dome Survival Shelter « Earthbag House Plans April 12, 2011 by Owen Geiger Triple Dome Survival Shelter (click to enlarge) Specifications: Three 16′ interior diameter domes with 603 sq. ft. interior, 3 sleeping lofts with 312 sq. ft., total 915 sq. ft. interior, one bedroom, one bath, Footprint: 38′ x 38′ We The Tiny House People This is journey into the tiny homes of people searching for simplicity, self-sufficiency, minimalism and happiness by creating shelter in caves, converted garages, trailers, tool sheds, river boats and former pigeon coops. Basically, Dirksen made a documentary on people living in tiny houses. For around five years she was traveling the world and filming these segments. Kirsten Dirksen is co-founder of faircompanies.com and a Huffington Post blogger. She has worked for MTV, Oxygen, The Travel Channel and Sundance Channel.

How to Build a Solar Heating Panel with Soda Cans If you’ve got good sun exposure on one side of your house, you can take advantage of free heat from the sun with this DIY solar heating panel, which uses old soda cans to collect and transfer the sun’s energy into your house. Sometimes, low-tech solar devices are much better than high-tech ones for home use, as they not only tend to be cheaper to make, but will also last much longer before any repairs or maintenance are necessary. And even better, they can be built in part from repurposed or recycled components, which is something you don’t see very often in new solar devices. Touch the Earth Ranch Do-it-Yourself Tips & Helpful Hints Here are some tricks of the trade we have discovered that will save you a lot of time and energy, depending on the type of project, and what resources you have available to you. Mechanical Tire Pounding What a time saver!

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