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Exponential Economist Meets Finite Physicist

[slimstat f='count' w='ip' lf='resource contains economist'] views this month; [slimstat f='count' w='ip' lf='strtotime equals 2011-07-01|interval equals -1'] overall Some while back, I found myself sitting next to an accomplished economics professor at a dinner event. Shortly after pleasantries, I said to him, “economic growth cannot continue indefinitely,” just to see where things would go. It was a lively and informative conversation. I was somewhat alarmed by the disconnect between economic theory and physical constraints—not for the first time, but here it was up-close and personal. Though my memory is not keen enough to recount our conversation verbatim, I thought I would at least try to capture the key points and convey the essence of the tennis match—with some entertainment value thrown in. Cast of characters: Physicist, played by me; Economist, played by an established economics professor from a prestigious institution. Act One: Bread and Butter Physicist: Hi, I’m Tom.

http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/2012/04/economist-meets-physicist/

Related:  EconomicsEconomicszero growth - population and sustainable economicsThe Myth of Infinite Growth

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