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Building with Cob: Post-Collapse Solution for Shelter

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HOW TO | The Great Northern Prepper This post was done by a Forum member Alaska Rose, who is a wealth of knowledge of wilderness and homesteading skills. Learn more from her and others on our FORUM This picture shows the most common way to cut the hide for skinning a game animal. The dotted lines around the legs and neck are the usual cuts for removing the head and lower legs. If you do not wish to keep the skin, you may want to just cut any way you can to get it off the animal the quickest way possible. The reasons behind this could be simple, just wanting to get the job done and you are by yourself and it is getting dark and you just know the crackling brush is a large bear coming to check out the smell of blood. This picture shows the easiest way to gut a very large animal without being up to your armpits in the body cavity cutting blind, trying to get everything inside to the outside without cutting yourself or a gut. This is geared more toward moose, but works fine for elk or deer, also. Like this: Like Loading...

Electric Camper: Tiny Geometric House on Wheels Not only is this highly unusual-looking vehicle a hand-made camper – it runs on electricity. Built from plywood, fiberglass, epoxy resin, bicycle parts and an electric motor, ‘Golden Gate’ by San Francisco artist Jay Nelson is reminiscent of all of those amazing hand-crafted house trucks from the 1970s, but with a very modern power source. The tiny camper measures just 96″x54″x64″, making it just large enough inside to lay down on the bed platform. By day, that platform also serves as the driver’s seat. There are no conventional gas and brake pedals here – the driver uses controls on the steering wheel to operate the vehicle. The Golden Gate is better equipped than you might expect, with a sink, stove, cooler, storage compartments and even a toilet. While its top speed of 20mph and lack of headlights doesn’t exactly make it ideal for traveling long distances, it’s easy to envision owning a tiny house like this for use as a swanky home base for camping.

Animated Knots by Grog | How to Tie Knots | Fishing, Boating, Climbing, Scouting, Search and Rescue, Household, Decorative, Rope Care, Sol Duc Cabin Project Details Built for a client who fly-fishes for steelhead on the Olympic Peninsula, this steel-clad 350 sf cabin on stilts can be completely shuttered when the owner is away. The cabin’s rugged patina and raw materiality respond to the surrounding wilderness while its verticality provides a safe haven during occasional floods from the nearby river. The overall design responds to the owner’s desire for a compact, low-maintenance, virtually indestructible building to house himself and his wife during fishing expeditions. Composed of two levels, the cabin’s entry, dining and kitchen areas are located on the lower floor while a sleeping loft with minimal shelving hovers above. Constructed primarily of unfinished, mild steel and structural insulated panels (SIPs), the cabin is supported by four steel columns and sits lightly on the site. The sleeping loft is the result of innovative materials salvaging and construction.

Wilderness Survival: Free info covering all aspects of survival. 3 | These Tiny Wooden Houses Are The College Dorm Of The Future A few years ago, Swedish student housing company AF Bostäder had a young woman from the city of Lund inside live in a tiny house-box--not even 10 square meters large--to test the idea of a cheap, cheerful, and environmentally friendly “smart student unit" that included a toilet, kitchen, and bed. “I think she still lives there,” says Linda Camara of Tengbom Architects, the company behind the 2013 iteration of the living pod--a petite vision in pale wood offset with lime green plant pots, cushions and stools. The premise for the cube, which has been in the works since 2007, is reasonable enough: students live and die on cheap housing, but everyone needs a toilet. Swedish housing regulations require student apartments to cover a minimum of 25 square meters, but Tengbom’s cubes, designed for students at the University of Lund, are the first known exception. The units are built with locally sourced wood.

PRACTICAL SURVIVOR | Practical Survivor We The Tiny House People This is journey into the tiny homes of people searching for simplicity, self-sufficiency, minimalism and happiness by creating shelter in caves, converted garages, trailers, tool sheds, river boats and former pigeon coops. Basically, Dirksen made a documentary on people living in tiny houses. For around five years she was traveling the world and filming these segments. Kirsten Dirksen is co-founder of faircompanies.com and a Huffington Post blogger. She has worked for MTV, Oxygen, The Travel Channel and Sundance Channel. From the author: I still live in a relatively spacious 1000 square foot apartment with my family of 4 (soon-to-be 5) and I’m not looking to downsize, but I can’t get enough of these tiny homes. I continue to be impressed by how so many Tiny House People have been able to let go of their stuff and not despite, but because of this, find a certain calm. Watch the full documentary now

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