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Masanobu Fukuoka

Masanobu Fukuoka
Masanobu Fukuoka (福岡 正信?) (2 February 1913 – 16 August 2008) was a Japanese farmer and philosopher celebrated for his natural farming and re-vegetation of desertified lands. He was a proponent of no-till, no-herbicide grain cultivation farming methods traditional to many indigenous cultures,[1] from which he created a particular method of farming, commonly referred to as "Natural Farming" or "Do-nothing Farming".[2][3][4] Fukuoka was the author of several Japanese books, scientific papers and other publications, and was featured in television documentaries and interviews from the 1970s onwards.[5] His influences went beyond farming to inspire individuals within the natural food and lifestyle movements. Life[edit] Fukuoka was born on 2 February 1913 in Iyo, Ehime, Japan, the second son of Kameichi Fukuoka, an educated and wealthy land owner and local leader. Iyo, Ehime. Iyo, Ehime. In 1940, Fukuoka married his wife Ayako, and over his life they had five children together. Awards[edit] Related:  Sustainable food advocates

Masanobu Fukuoka's Natural Farming and Permaculture | Permaculture & Alcohol Can Be A Gas Masanobu Fukuoka is a farmer/philosopher who lives on the Island of Shikoku, in southern Japan. His farming technique requires no machines, no chemicals and very little weeding. He does not plow the soil or use prepared compost and yet the condition of the soil in his orchards and fields improve each year. His method creates no pollution and does not require fossil fuels. His method requires less labor than any other, yet the yields in his orchard and fields compare favorably with the most productive Japanese farms which use all the technical know-how of modern science. How is this possible? I had not heard of permaculture at the time, but I can see now that Fukuoka's farm is a classic working model of permaculture design. Mollison and Fukuoka took entirely different routes to get to essentially the same place. The key word here is design. The idea for natural farming came to Fukuoka when he was about twenty five years old. But where to begin? Zone 2 is his grain fields. Larry Korn P.O.

Richard Levins Richard "Dick" Levins is a mathematical ecologist, and political activist. He is best known for his work on evolution in changing environments and on metapopulations. Levins' writing and speaking is extremely condensed. Levins also has written on philosophical issues in biology and modelling. Also with Lewontin, Levins has co-authored a number of satirical articles criticizing sociobiology, systems modeling in ecology, and other topics under the pseudonym Isadore Nabi. Biography[edit] Levins was born in New York on June 1, 1930. Levins studied agriculture and mathematics at Cornell. Levins is John Rock Professor of Population Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health. Evolution in changing environments[edit] Prior to Levins' work, population genetics assumed the environment to be constant, while mathematical ecology assumed the genetic makeup of the species involved to be constant. [edit] Awards[edit] Selected bibliography[edit] Levins, R. References[edit] External links[edit]

Home Page Bill Mollison Bruce Charles 'Bill' Mollison (born 1928 in Stanley, Tasmania, Australia) is a researcher, author, scientist, teacher and Biologist. He is considered to be the 'father of permaculture',[1] however Joseph Russell Smith, was the first to write about a system of Permanent Agriculture in a book entitled Tree Crops, published in 1929.[2] Permaculture is an integrated system of design, Mollison co-developed with David Holmgren, that encompasses not only agriculture, horticulture, architecture and ecology, but also economic systems, land access strategies and legal systems for businesses and communities. In 1978, Mollison collaborated with David Holmgren, and they wrote a book called Permaculture One. Bill Mollison founded The Permaculture Institute in Tasmania, and created a training system to train others under the umbrella of Permaculture. He received the Right Livelihood Award in 1981 with Patrick van Rensburg. Bibliography[edit] Articles Mollison, Bill (15–21 September 1978). See also[edit]

Permaculture With its system of applied education, research and citizen- led design permaculture has grown a popular web of global networks and developed into a global social movement[citation needed]. The term permaculture was developed and coined by David Holmgren, then a graduate student at the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education's Department of Environmental Design, and Bill Mollison, senior lecturer in Environmental Psychology at University of Tasmania, in 1978. [1] The word permaculture originally referred to "permanent agriculture",[3] but was expanded to stand also for "permanent culture", as it was understood that social aspects were integral to a truly sustainable system as inspired by Masanobu Fukuoka’s natural farming philosophy. It has many branches that include, but are not limited to, ecological design, ecological engineering, regenerative design, environmental design, and construction. History[edit] Several individuals revolutionized the branch of permaculture. In Australian P.A.

Frances Moore Lappé | Small Planet Institute Frances Moore Lappé is the author or co-author of 18 books including the three-million copy Diet for a Small Planet. Her most recent work, released by Nation Books in September 2011, is EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think to Create the World We Want, winner of a silver medal from the Independent Publisher Book Awards in the Environment/Ecology/Nature category. Jane Goodall called the book "powerful and inspiring. "Ecomind will open your eyes and change your thinking. I want everyone to read it," she said. She is the cofounder of three organizations, including Oakland based think tank Food First and, more recently, the Small Planet Institute, a collaborative network for research and popular education seeking to bring democracy to life, which she leads with her daughter Anna Lappé. A small number of people in every generation are forerunners, in thought, action, spirit, who swerve past the barriers of greed and power to hold a torch high for the rest of us. —The Washington Post

Cyrano de Bergerac Hercule-Savinien de Cyrano de Bergerac (6 March 1619 – 28 July 1655) was a French dramatist and duelist . In fictional works about his life he is featured with an overly large nose, which people would travel from miles around to see. Portraits suggest that he did have a big nose, though not nearly as large as described in works about him. Cyrano's work furnished models and ideas for subsequent writers. Life and works [ edit source | edit beta ] He is the son of Abel de Cyrano, lord of Mauvières and Bergerac, and Espérance Bellanger. Ishbel Addyman claims that he was not a Gascogne aristocrat , but a descendant of Sardinian fishmonger, that the Bergerac appellation stemmed from a small estate near Paris where he was born, and not in Gascogne, that he suffered tertiary syphilis , and that around 1640 he became the lover of Charles Coypeau d'Assoucy , a writer and musician, until around 1653, when they became engaged in a bitter rivalry. Death [ edit source | edit beta ] In 1998, James L.

David Holmgren David Holmgren (born 1955) is an Australian environmental designer, ecological educator and writer. He is best known as one of the co-originators of the permaculture concept with Bill Mollison. Life and work[edit] Holmgren was born in the state of Western Australia to political parents who were very active in the movement against Australia's involvement in the Vietnam war. I wrote the manuscript, which was based partly on our constant discussions and on our practical working together in the garden and on our visits to other sites in Tasmania... The book was a mixture of insights relating to agriculture, landscape architecture and ecology. According to Holmgren, '(t)he word permaculture was coined by Bill Mollison and myself in the mid-1970s to describe an "integrated, evolving system of perennial or self-perpetuating plant and animal species useful to man". Permaculture: Principles and Pathways beyond Sustainability[edit] Weeds or Wild Nature[edit] Eco village design[edit] Translation[edit]

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