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Defining Critical Thinking

Defining Critical Thinking
It entails the examination of those structures or elements of thought implicit in all reasoning: purpose, problem, or question-at-issue; assumptions; concepts; empirical grounding; reasoning leading to conclusions; implications and consequences; objections from alternative viewpoints; and frame of reference. Critical thinking — in being responsive to variable subject matter, issues, and purposes — is incorporated in a family of interwoven modes of thinking, among them: scientific thinking, mathematical thinking, historical thinking, anthropological thinking, economic thinking, moral thinking, and philosophical thinking. Critical thinking can be seen as having two components: 1) a set of information and belief generating and processing skills, and 2) the habit, based on intellectual commitment, of using those skills to guide behavior. Critical thinking varies according to the motivation underlying it. Another Brief Conceptualization of Critical Thinking Why Critical Thinking? (Edward M.

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Overloaded with information, students need critical thinking skills Students today have unprecedented access to information. According to educator Karl Fisch, in one week of reading The New York Times, an individual will encounter more information than people in the 18th century would have had access to during the entire course of their lives. Forbes magazine has estimated the total number of pages indexed on Google to be more than one trillion. While this deluge of often-conflicting information should make students less certain of what they believe, it appears to be having the opposite effect.

Critical Thinking Pathways Critical thinking is trendy these days. With 6.3 million hits resulting from a Google search -- six times "Bloom's Taxonomy" -- its importance is undeniable. Worldwide, critical thinking (CT) is integrated into finger-painting lessons, units on Swiss immigrants, discussions of Cinderella, and the Common Core State Standards. In short, critical thinking is more beloved than Egyptian cotton. Definitions abound. Critical thinking is: Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. They help to define what it means to be human. Most important thought during our lives will center on such essential questions. What does it mean to be a good friend?

Haecceity Haecceity (/hɛkˈsiːɪtɪ/; from the Latin haecceitas, which translates as "thisness") is a term from medieval philosophy first coined by Duns Scotus which denotes the discrete qualities, properties or characteristics of a thing which make it a particular thing. Haecceity is a person or object's "thisness", the individualising difference between the concept 'a man' and the concept 'Socrates' (a specific person).[1] Charles Sanders Peirce later used the term as a non-descriptive reference to an individual.[2] Haecceity and quiddity[edit] Haecceity may be defined in some dictionaries as simply the "essence" of a thing, or as a simple synonym for quiddity or hypokeimenon. However, such a definition deprives the term of its subtle distinctiveness and utility.

Critical Thinking: Basic Questions & Answers To think well is to impose discipline and restraint on our thinking-by means of intellectual standards — in order to raise our thinking to a level of "perfection" or quality that is not natural or likely in undisciplined, spontaneous thought. The dimension of critical thinking least understood is that of "intellectual standards." Most teachers were not taught how to assess thinking through standards; indeed, often the thinking of teachers themselves is very "undisciplined" and reflects a lack of internalized intellectual standards. Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor The word "rigor" is hard to avoid today, and it provokes strong reactions from educators. Policymakers tout its importance. Publishers promote it as a feature of their materials. But some teachers share the view of Joanne Yatvin, past president of the National Council for Teachers of English. To them, rigor simply means more work, harder books, and longer school days.

Inclusion in the 21st-century classroom: Differentiating with technology - Reaching every learner: Differentiating instruction in theory and practice In this video, students in a gifted classroom use the multi-user learning environment Quest Atlantis to explore issues related to the creation of a game reserve in Tanzania. Interviews with the teacher and students offer perspectives on the value of using virtual worlds in the classroom . About the videoDownload video (Right-click or option-click) The diversity of the 21st-century classroom creates numerous challenges for teachers who may not have known the same diversity themselves as students. Among these, teachers must balance the requirements of high-stakes accountability while meeting the needs of diverse students within their classroom. The 26th Annual Report to Congress on IDEA reported that approximately ninety-six percent of general education teachers have students in their classroom with learning disabilities.

A Wonder Room – every school should have one The large white 1950s telephone could have been a prop from the set of Mad Men. It shares a shelf with a vinyl-clad Vector Radio that looks as though it should be permanently tuned to Radio Luxembourg. Nearby is a black typewriter so old it might have been used in Billy Wilder's adaptation of The Front Page. Tautology (logic) is sometimes used to denote an arbitrary tautology, with the dual symbol (falsum) representing an arbitrary contradiction. Tautologies are a key concept in propositional logic, where a tautology is defined as a propositional formula that is true under any possible Boolean valuation of its propositional variables. A key property of tautologies in propositional logic is that an effective method exists for testing whether a given formula is always satisfied (or, equivalently, whether its negation is unsatisfiable). In 1800, Immanuel Kant wrote in his book Logic:

Critical thinking Critical thinking is a type of clear, reasoned thinking. According to Beyer (1995) Critical thinking means making clear, reasoned judgements. While in the process of critical thinking, ideas should be reasoned and well thought out/judged.[1] The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. The Importance Of Critical Thinking Source: www.eftbrisbane.com | Original Post Date: January 3, 2009 - Critical thinking is an incredibly important skill. We use this skill (or ought to) in every aspect of our lives every single day. Although it’s an important part of academic and business success, it’s not often taught at school unless it’s part of a math, science, or business curriculum. The basic definition of critical thinking is the ability to take information and make informed decisions without being influenced by your own opinions. Critical thinking is all about being in control of your own thought processes rather than letting them take control of you.

Are we ready to revolutionize K-12 learning? SmartBlogs Recently I’ve been escorting my first grandchild, Luke, on tours of the garden and grounds around our home. It’s probably more accurate to say that Luke — who has just turned one — is towing me through the tulips. With my finger in his hand, he’s pulling “B” (his pet name for me) at what for him is breakneck speed through an incredible learning adventure. Every day.

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